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Richard Misrach

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MAGAZINE
May 22, 1988 | Kem Nunn
RICHARD MISRACH was born in Los Angeles in 1949. It was the ski trips as a teen-ager, however, those long drives up 395, that introduced him to the California desert. The place seemed desolate and dull then, a place to be gotten through on the way to someplace else. Later, in the '70s, his interests sparked by the visionary works and desert landscapes created by writers such as Carlos Castaneda, Misrach took a second look.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2010 | By Lynell George, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For blocks and blocks they appeared — grids, circles, numerals: In post-Katrina New Orleans, those symbols became indelible shorthand, modern hieroglyphics set down in fluorescent paint, runny marker, even chalk embroidered on the sides of what was left of the city's built-architecture — duplexes, shotgun shacks, colonials done in miniature. These markings whispered stories, hash marks that baldly communicated with any passerby the tally of how many bodies remained — humans, pets — and where they might be found inside.
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MAGAZINE
November 4, 1990 | SEAN ELDER, Sean Elder is a free-lance writer living in New York.
IN JUNE OF 1986, photographer Richard Misrach and his German shepherd, Kodak, took a walk through the desert. It was not unusual terrain for them, but Misrach moved gingerly. He was scanning the landscape for more than a great shot: Scattered about were hundreds of unexploded bombs, varying in weight from 25 to 2,000 pounds. He knew how to distinguish between the live ones and the dummies.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2005 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
SIGMUND FREUD believed that great art awakens oceanic sentiments, making viewers feel connected to things larger than ourselves. Richard Misrach's most recent photographs take this aspect of Freudian thinking literally. They focus on the ocean to explore the relationship between the individual and infinity.
MAGAZINE
June 8, 2003 | ANN HEROLD
All those wondering how photographer Richard Misrach gets his God's-eye views won't be getting any answers from the artist. Is he hovering in a helicopter? Standing on a cherry picker? The mystery is everything. "There's a strange sense of voyeurism" created by the unusual vantage point, he argues, that would be lost in focusing on such pedestrian details as camera, lens, location.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2010 | By Lynell George, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For blocks and blocks they appeared — grids, circles, numerals: In post-Katrina New Orleans, those symbols became indelible shorthand, modern hieroglyphics set down in fluorescent paint, runny marker, even chalk embroidered on the sides of what was left of the city's built-architecture — duplexes, shotgun shacks, colonials done in miniature. These markings whispered stories, hash marks that baldly communicated with any passerby the tally of how many bodies remained — humans, pets — and where they might be found inside.
MAGAZINE
December 23, 1990
Regarding "The Tainted Desert" (by Sean Elder, Nov. 4): In the name of military preparedness, destroy an island; destroy a desert; destroy the plants and animals that make these places their homes; destroy people. Will the visions someday be of all of our lives finished, lying in the poisoned desert beside bombs and military debris? Will Richard Misrach record this? PAMELA GHALEB Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2005 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
SIGMUND FREUD believed that great art awakens oceanic sentiments, making viewers feel connected to things larger than ourselves. Richard Misrach's most recent photographs take this aspect of Freudian thinking literally. They focus on the ocean to explore the relationship between the individual and infinity.
BOOKS
December 6, 1992 | Kristine Mckenna
The latest installment in the Desert Cantos, an ongoing photographic project begun by Misrach in 1979, "Violent Legacies" includes some of the hardest hitting work to date by the most important environmental photographer of the late 20th Century. The book opens with an extremely feeble work of fiction by Susan Sontag that pales further when measured against the powerful photographs that follow it.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1996 | Steve Appleford, Steve Appleford is an occasional contributor to Calendar
Photographer Richard Misrach wasn't exactly surprised when his latest series of pictures drew skepticism from friends and dealers in 1994. He realized the photographs were not the usual landscape images. There were no horizon lines, no trees, no clouds, just . . . skies: rich fields of color, blues, reds, grays. But Misrach was just as certain that these minimalist photographs were an important new layer to his 18-year examination of the Southwestern desert landscape.
MAGAZINE
June 8, 2003 | ANN HEROLD
All those wondering how photographer Richard Misrach gets his God's-eye views won't be getting any answers from the artist. Is he hovering in a helicopter? Standing on a cherry picker? The mystery is everything. "There's a strange sense of voyeurism" created by the unusual vantage point, he argues, that would be lost in focusing on such pedestrian details as camera, lens, location.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1996 | Steve Appleford, Steve Appleford is an occasional contributor to Calendar
Photographer Richard Misrach wasn't exactly surprised when his latest series of pictures drew skepticism from friends and dealers in 1994. He realized the photographs were not the usual landscape images. There were no horizon lines, no trees, no clouds, just . . . skies: rich fields of color, blues, reds, grays. But Misrach was just as certain that these minimalist photographs were an important new layer to his 18-year examination of the Southwestern desert landscape.
BOOKS
December 6, 1992 | Kristine Mckenna
The latest installment in the Desert Cantos, an ongoing photographic project begun by Misrach in 1979, "Violent Legacies" includes some of the hardest hitting work to date by the most important environmental photographer of the late 20th Century. The book opens with an extremely feeble work of fiction by Susan Sontag that pales further when measured against the powerful photographs that follow it.
MAGAZINE
December 23, 1990
Regarding "The Tainted Desert" (by Sean Elder, Nov. 4): In the name of military preparedness, destroy an island; destroy a desert; destroy the plants and animals that make these places their homes; destroy people. Will the visions someday be of all of our lives finished, lying in the poisoned desert beside bombs and military debris? Will Richard Misrach record this? PAMELA GHALEB Santa Monica
MAGAZINE
November 4, 1990 | SEAN ELDER, Sean Elder is a free-lance writer living in New York.
IN JUNE OF 1986, photographer Richard Misrach and his German shepherd, Kodak, took a walk through the desert. It was not unusual terrain for them, but Misrach moved gingerly. He was scanning the landscape for more than a great shot: Scattered about were hundreds of unexploded bombs, varying in weight from 25 to 2,000 pounds. He knew how to distinguish between the live ones and the dummies.
MAGAZINE
May 22, 1988 | Kem Nunn
RICHARD MISRACH was born in Los Angeles in 1949. It was the ski trips as a teen-ager, however, those long drives up 395, that introduced him to the California desert. The place seemed desolate and dull then, a place to be gotten through on the way to someplace else. Later, in the '70s, his interests sparked by the visionary works and desert landscapes created by writers such as Carlos Castaneda, Misrach took a second look.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1988 | CATHY CURTIS
Photographer Richard Misrach finds a delicate abstract beauty in the Salton Sea, a flooded ancient lake near Palm Springs. His "Desert Seas" series of the mid-'80s is part of an ongoing group of desert "cantos," songs to a strangely visionary land. He's an heir of the Luminists--those 19th-Century painters of utterly calm, glassy-surfaced seas. Sun and atmospheric conditions variously tint Misrach's lake water a wrapping-paper brown, wispy blue, pearly gray, faint yellow.
MAGAZINE
January 14, 2007 | Colin Westerbeck
Work by Misrach and scores of other photographers will be on view during Photo L.A., at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium from Jan. 19-21. * Photography is a dialectical art, often progressing through a sequence of apparent contradictions. Consider Richard Misrach's career. In the early 1970s, he was photographing people on the streets of Berkeley in the wee hours of the morning.
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