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Richard Mollica

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NEWS
January 4, 1990 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a hot and steamy night last November, as the muffled booms of artillery shells echoed in the distance, the pressures of life in this refugee camp turned one man into a monster. Angered that his wife and 6-year-old daughter had gone for an evening walk against his wishes, Touch Chamleakana began drinking heavily. When they returned, he savagely attacked them with an ax. Both died instantly.
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NEWS
January 4, 1990 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a hot and steamy night last November, as the muffled booms of artillery shells echoed in the distance, the pressures of life in this refugee camp turned one man into a monster. Angered that his wife and 6-year-old daughter had gone for an evening walk against his wishes, Touch Chamleakana began drinking heavily. When they returned, he savagely attacked them with an ax. Both died instantly.
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OPINION
April 7, 2005
Re "Marines Take Up Fight on Postwar Stress," April 2: There are any number of catch phrases to describe psychological treatment for war veterans, such as Chaplain Smith's "You need to take out the garbage before it lowers the property values." The one I like best is from Dr. Richard Mollica at Harvard who said, "The best antidepressant is a job." Whatever short-term "warrior transition" approach is used, it had better be followed up by longer-range programs to assure that combat veterans get good jobs after leaving the service.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | CHRISTINA V. GODBEY
Moving stinks. You already know that. And whenever you have to move to a different house or apartment, you discover anew that it stinks even worse than you remembered. But Tom Nevermann faces this stress-filled horror every day without fear. Nevermann is in the business of the stress of moving. He is the founder of The Moving Doctor, a Beverly Hills company that helps clients contend with the physical and psychological problems associated with moving. He spends hours planning.
WORLD
May 26, 2008 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
At a camp for earthquake survivors, a psychologist hands some plastic toys to a lonely girl named Wang Yue and encourages her to build a house. Why did you put a phone there? he asks her. To call my parents. What's the police car for? To find my grandfather. What's the ambulance for? So I don't get hurt. This month's devastating quake in China destroyed the 9-year-old's house -- and her little world. Her parents, migrant workers, live far away.
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