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Richard Mosk

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1994 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two decades after his appointment as chairman of the Classification & Rating Administration, the film industry's controversial ratings arm, Richard Heffner is relinquishing the hot seat. His successor, Richard Mosk, will assume the post July 1. "Nothing lasts forever," explains Jack Valenti, president of the Motion Picture Assn. of America which, with the National Assn. of Theater Owners, oversees the ratings board. "After 20 years, we're bringing someone else in to keep the institution alive."
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OPINION
August 26, 2002
Reading "Putting a Price on Sept. 11's Human Loss" (Aug. 21) left me outraged. It describes recent lawsuits of families of victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and says Michael James "stands to receive more than $1 million." Families of victims have my utmost sympathy for the tragedy that struck them on that day. In no way do I believe that the deaths of their loved ones are the least bit inconsequential. I also understand that sudden loss of a family member who leaves behind dependents and perhaps unpaid bills, as well as loss of the care they provided, such as "cooking, cleaning [and]
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Justice Stanley Mosk, who died last week after serving 37 years on the California Supreme Court, was remembered Tuesday for what speaker after speaker called his "legacy of justice." A memorial service for Mosk at the Wilshire Boulevard Temple attracted hundreds, including a wide array of public officials. Among those attending were Gov. Gray Davis, state Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer, state Senate President Pro Tem John Burton, Los Angeles Mayor-elect James K.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Justice Stanley Mosk, who died last week after serving 37 years on the California Supreme Court, was remembered Tuesday for what speaker after speaker called his "legacy of justice." A memorial service for Mosk at the Wilshire Boulevard Temple attracted hundreds, including a wide array of public officials. Among those attending were Gov. Gray Davis, state Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer, state Senate President Pro Tem John Burton, Los Angeles Mayor-elect James K.
OPINION
August 26, 2002
Reading "Putting a Price on Sept. 11's Human Loss" (Aug. 21) left me outraged. It describes recent lawsuits of families of victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and says Michael James "stands to receive more than $1 million." Families of victims have my utmost sympathy for the tragedy that struck them on that day. In no way do I believe that the deaths of their loved ones are the least bit inconsequential. I also understand that sudden loss of a family member who leaves behind dependents and perhaps unpaid bills, as well as loss of the care they provided, such as "cooking, cleaning [and]
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1994 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES MOVIE EDITOR
Filmmakers and distributors expecting to see radical changes in the way their movies are rated are in for a big disappointment. Richard Mosk, the new chairman of the Motion Picture Assn. of America's Classification and Ratings Administration board, who last month replaced 20-year veteran Richard Heffner, says he sees little, if anything, wrong with the system that's been used to designate film ratings in this country for the past 25 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1993
As members of the Los Angeles City-County Fire Board of Inquiry in 1971 following the disastrous Malibu fires (to which your Nov. 10 editorial refers), Paul Ziffren and I expressed our concern that the work and recommendations of the board would be ignored, as is often the case with appointed commissions. Our concerns were justified, for many of the board's worthwhile proposals have been disregarded--to the detriment of our community and the brave firefighters. I hope that the commission proposed by The Times, if formed, follows the lead of the Christopher Commission, which successfully oversaw the implementation of many of its recommendations.
OPINION
August 5, 2002
John Balzar (Commentary, July 31) points to some of California's problems. But one should not be overly nostalgic for the past. To be sure, we had some great, far-sighted leaders, such as California Govs. Hiram Johnson, Earl Warren and Pat Brown. But California's urban and fiscal problems of today are legacies of an earlier, lobbyist-dominated leadership that was apathetic to our inevitable population explosion and that failed to deal with predictable deficiencies, such as transportation, education and other social ills.
OPINION
August 31, 2002
Re "A Crazy Quilt of Victim Compensation," Commentary, Aug. 18: My family's case against Iran is singled out by Judge Richard Mosk as he argues against continuing the federal law that allows terror victims to collect compensation from state sponsors of terrorism. Mosk writes that our seizure of Iranian assets is tantamount to Iran's seizure of the American Embassy in Tehran. What he overlooks is that we act through the U.S. courts using American law, following trial and enforcement proceedings that Iran chose to ignore, whereas Iran's takeover of our embassy was done by a mob controlled by Iran's revolutionary apparatus.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1992
Regarding Richard Mosk's Counterpunch, "The Plot to Assassinate the Warren Commission" (Dec. 30): It is predictable that Mosk would be defensive regarding the film's questioning of the single-bullet-theory conclusion drawn by the Warren Commission nearly 30 years ago, a commission on which he served. Mosk took the predictable route of attempting to reduce the intent of the film's political inquiries to the high jinks of media moguls who would misrepresent historical facts in order to make a fast buck.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1994 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES MOVIE EDITOR
Filmmakers and distributors expecting to see radical changes in the way their movies are rated are in for a big disappointment. Richard Mosk, the new chairman of the Motion Picture Assn. of America's Classification and Ratings Administration board, who last month replaced 20-year veteran Richard Heffner, says he sees little, if anything, wrong with the system that's been used to designate film ratings in this country for the past 25 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1994 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two decades after his appointment as chairman of the Classification & Rating Administration, the film industry's controversial ratings arm, Richard Heffner is relinquishing the hot seat. His successor, Richard Mosk, will assume the post July 1. "Nothing lasts forever," explains Jack Valenti, president of the Motion Picture Assn. of America which, with the National Assn. of Theater Owners, oversees the ratings board. "After 20 years, we're bringing someone else in to keep the institution alive."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1992
So Richard M. Mosk concludes that there's a conspiracy "by publishers and the entertainment industry to distort history for profit" ("The Plot to Assassinate the Warren Commission," Dec. 30). If so, then what a grand opportunity it would be for director Oliver Stone to delve back into the '60s and make a movie about how the space program and the moon landings never really took place . Here, he would show the "moon landings" faked for the public on a Hollywood sound stage and the immense sums appropriated for the space program divided up among Nixon and his cronies!
NEWS
October 21, 1986 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
Stanley Mosk's mother sat at her kitchen table 42 years ago and hand-addressed scores of postcards asking voters to support her son, the judge, and "preserve a fearless and independent judiciary." His mother has died and Mosk left the trial court long ago. But in this, his final campaign, Supreme Court Justice Stanley Mosk still keeps his organization in the family. And judging from opinion polls, he will win again--easily.
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