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Richard Murphy

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NEWS
May 23, 1993
Richard Murphy, screenwriter and director twice nominated for an Academy Award, has died at age 81. Murphy died Wednesday in Cedars-Sinai Medical Center of complications from a stroke suffered two years ago. His screenplays nominated for Oscars were "Boomerang" in 1947 and "The Desert Rats" in 1963. Other scripts included the films "Cry of the City" in 1948, "Panic in the Streets" in 1950, "Broken Lance" in 1954, and "The Last Angry Man" and "Compulsion," both in 1959.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
October 10, 2009
Re "Obama awarded Nobel Peace Prize for diplomacy," Web article, Oct. 9 I support President Obama as much as anyone, but let's face it, what the Nobel committee really did was award the prize to the American people for electing Obama. Obama's great accomplishment in the eyes of the committee? Not being George W. Bush. Richard Murphy Whittier :: Congratulations to Obama for your vision, perseverance and communication skills to get the important message to the world that the U.S. is morally back.
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OPINION
April 24, 2005
So House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R-Texas) wants to pillory Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy for "judicial activism" (April 20). Funny. The GOP was quite happy with Kennedy's judicial activism when he was the key swing vote in Bush vs. Gore. Richard Murphy Whittier
OPINION
May 2, 2006
Re " 'Nuestro Himno' Foes Say U.S. Song Should Be in English," April 29 A group of talented Latino musicians choose to offer a heartfelt tribute to our nation and national anthem by singing it in their first (not only) language, and they get treated like they've committed murder. President Bush finds it unacceptable; Francis Scott Key's great-great grandson calls it "despicable." This despite the fact that it seems to be an American pastime to butcher the anthem at sporting events.
OPINION
May 2, 2006
Re " 'Nuestro Himno' Foes Say U.S. Song Should Be in English," April 29 A group of talented Latino musicians choose to offer a heartfelt tribute to our nation and national anthem by singing it in their first (not only) language, and they get treated like they've committed murder. President Bush finds it unacceptable; Francis Scott Key's great-great grandson calls it "despicable." This despite the fact that it seems to be an American pastime to butcher the anthem at sporting events.
OPINION
December 7, 1997
How come your Dec. 2 story on the West Paducah murders does not identify it as a hate crime? Someone systematically murders a group of Christians at prayer and the most likely motive you ascribe to the murderer is that he was made fun of by classmates? This guy made a calculated selection of his victims. He chose practicing Christians. Had he chosen a group of black students the story would have had an entirely different thrust. RICHARD MURPHY Whittier I assume that the National Rifle Assn.
OPINION
October 10, 2009
Re "Obama awarded Nobel Peace Prize for diplomacy," Web article, Oct. 9 I support President Obama as much as anyone, but let's face it, what the Nobel committee really did was award the prize to the American people for electing Obama. Obama's great accomplishment in the eyes of the committee? Not being George W. Bush. Richard Murphy Whittier :: Congratulations to Obama for your vision, perseverance and communication skills to get the important message to the world that the U.S. is morally back.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2002
Apparently, Michael Eisner's salary has migrated from facts to urban legend. Yes, in the first 15 years he was at Walt Disney Co. he was fabulously paid. But he does not get, as John Jaeger asserts ["Unimpressed by Eisner's Disney Stock Purchase," Letters, Aug. 25], $200 million annually. In 1996, Eisner cashed in options and netted $565 million. He was able to do so because he took over a moribund company on the verge of breakup and increased its value twentyfold in 12 years, creating $43 billion in new wealth for shareholders.
OPINION
August 9, 2002
Re "Broadcasters of Hearn's Stature Mean More Than Words Can Describe," Aug. 7: Grouping Chick Hearn and Vin Scully with the likes of Ernie Harwell and Jack Buck misrepresents their legacy. It suggests that the distinguishing characteristic of both men is simply longevity. Hearn and Scully are the best broadcasters ever in their respective sports. They stand alone. Los Angeles was blessed when both men began plying their craft over our airwaves. Richard Murphy Whittier Whenever someone from outside Southern California has asked me if I don't miss having seasons, I have always responded that there are two season in L.A.: Vin Scully and Chick Hearn.
NEWS
December 12, 1993
I would like to commend your efforts in bringing a new sense of awareness to your readers. "Chasing a Dream: What One Man Can Do" (City Times, Nov. 28) was very interesting, and I agree with what Lovelace Lee III said. Role models are important! As a white man, I usually see white people as the good guys on TV. Young blacks, however, are receiving a warped sense of reality regarding adult black people. All the kids see, most of the time, is a black man selling drugs, beating a woman and/or going to jail.
OPINION
April 24, 2005
So House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R-Texas) wants to pillory Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy for "judicial activism" (April 20). Funny. The GOP was quite happy with Kennedy's judicial activism when he was the key swing vote in Bush vs. Gore. Richard Murphy Whittier
BUSINESS
September 1, 2002
Apparently, Michael Eisner's salary has migrated from facts to urban legend. Yes, in the first 15 years he was at Walt Disney Co. he was fabulously paid. But he does not get, as John Jaeger asserts ["Unimpressed by Eisner's Disney Stock Purchase," Letters, Aug. 25], $200 million annually. In 1996, Eisner cashed in options and netted $565 million. He was able to do so because he took over a moribund company on the verge of breakup and increased its value twentyfold in 12 years, creating $43 billion in new wealth for shareholders.
OPINION
August 9, 2002
Re "Broadcasters of Hearn's Stature Mean More Than Words Can Describe," Aug. 7: Grouping Chick Hearn and Vin Scully with the likes of Ernie Harwell and Jack Buck misrepresents their legacy. It suggests that the distinguishing characteristic of both men is simply longevity. Hearn and Scully are the best broadcasters ever in their respective sports. They stand alone. Los Angeles was blessed when both men began plying their craft over our airwaves. Richard Murphy Whittier Whenever someone from outside Southern California has asked me if I don't miss having seasons, I have always responded that there are two season in L.A.: Vin Scully and Chick Hearn.
OPINION
December 7, 1997
How come your Dec. 2 story on the West Paducah murders does not identify it as a hate crime? Someone systematically murders a group of Christians at prayer and the most likely motive you ascribe to the murderer is that he was made fun of by classmates? This guy made a calculated selection of his victims. He chose practicing Christians. Had he chosen a group of black students the story would have had an entirely different thrust. RICHARD MURPHY Whittier I assume that the National Rifle Assn.
NEWS
December 12, 1993
I would like to commend your efforts in bringing a new sense of awareness to your readers. "Chasing a Dream: What One Man Can Do" (City Times, Nov. 28) was very interesting, and I agree with what Lovelace Lee III said. Role models are important! As a white man, I usually see white people as the good guys on TV. Young blacks, however, are receiving a warped sense of reality regarding adult black people. All the kids see, most of the time, is a black man selling drugs, beating a woman and/or going to jail.
NEWS
May 23, 1993
Richard Murphy, screenwriter and director twice nominated for an Academy Award, has died at age 81. Murphy died Wednesday in Cedars-Sinai Medical Center of complications from a stroke suffered two years ago. His screenplays nominated for Oscars were "Boomerang" in 1947 and "The Desert Rats" in 1963. Other scripts included the films "Cry of the City" in 1948, "Panic in the Streets" in 1950, "Broken Lance" in 1954, and "The Last Angry Man" and "Compulsion," both in 1959.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1985
Bank of Beverly Hills appointed Richard J. Murphy senior vice president-commercial lending.
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