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Richard N Goodwin

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April 6, 2003 | David Gritten, Special to The Times
"Writing a play is hard," Richard N. Goodwin reflects. "I found it the most difficult thing I'd ever undertaken. It's much easier to write a national speech for a U.S. president than to write a play." Goodwin is one of the few men in the world who could offer such an opinion based on personal experience. In the 1960s, he was a speechwriter for two Democratic presidents, John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. Now at age 71, he has finally made his debut as a dramatist.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2003 | David Gritten, Special to The Times
"Writing a play is hard," Richard N. Goodwin reflects. "I found it the most difficult thing I'd ever undertaken. It's much easier to write a national speech for a U.S. president than to write a play." Goodwin is one of the few men in the world who could offer such an opinion based on personal experience. In the 1960s, he was a speechwriter for two Democratic presidents, John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. Now at age 71, he has finally made his debut as a dramatist.
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NEWS
September 14, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
Richard N. Goodwin has grown bored with the questions about why he wrote such mean things about Lyndon Baines Johnson. "I'm not saying anything mean about Johnson," Goodwin said in an interview in his living room here. His voice was less testy than resigned; this was not the first time he had been asked about his iconoclasm, and he was not the first person to write that Johnson was difficult or that he sometimes received guests while seated on the toilet.
NEWS
August 7, 1998 | MICHAEL FRANK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard N. Goodwin's "The Hinge of the World" is a rare accomplishment, a book of ideas that manages to be animated, suspenseful and firmly grounded in the individual psychological identities of its principal characters. The ideas under discussion here--about scientific method and the threat it posed to Catholicism during the first decades of the 17th century--feel as fresh and as startling as when they were first formulated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1993 | RICHARD N. GOODWIN, Richard N. Goodwin was an assistant special counsel to President Kennedy and a special assistant to President Johnson. He now writes in Concord, Mass.
"To everything there is a season." And without fail there will be a season to make critical, even harsh judgments on the acts and policies of President William Jefferson Clinton. But not today. For in his inaugural, Clinton met the first test of his presidency with dignity and understanding. An inaugural address, like most political speeches, is not a literary composition but an event. It is not designed for inclusion in anthologies, but to accomplish a fairly immediate purpose.
NEWS
August 7, 1998 | MICHAEL FRANK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard N. Goodwin's "The Hinge of the World" is a rare accomplishment, a book of ideas that manages to be animated, suspenseful and firmly grounded in the individual psychological identities of its principal characters. The ideas under discussion here--about scientific method and the threat it posed to Catholicism during the first decades of the 17th century--feel as fresh and as startling as when they were first formulated.
BOOKS
September 25, 1988 | Jim Miller, Miller is the author of "Democracy Is in the Streets: From Port Huron to the Siege of Chicago" (Simon & Schuster). and
Once a White House insider under Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson, later an influential outsider and critic of the war in Vietnam, Richard Goodwin has written a flawed but fascinating kind of political Bildungsroman .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1998
Regarding Richard N. Goodwin's May 27 commentary about the rule of money: His timing couldn't have been better. It was published the same day the Business section reported the possible spread of the Asian economic crisis to Latin America and Mexico. The warning has been sounded; the writing's on the wall: Asia + Latin America + Global Economy = Crested Wave. If you think homelessness and poverty are bad now, you haven't begun to see what's coming--very soon. Just hope it doesn't start World War III. CHRIS ELLIS San Bernardino
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1997
Richard N. Goodwin's Jan. 30 commentary shows how long our country has suffered from the undue influence of monied "citizens ... actuated by some common interest .J.J. adverse to the rights of other citizens or to the ... interests of the community," as Goodwin quotes James Madison. The "common interest" was and is greed. Thomas Jefferson wrote in 1816, "I hope we shall crush in its birth the aristocracy of our monied corporations which dare already to challenge our country to a trial of strength and bid defiance to the laws of our country."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1989
The Times is to be commended for publishing Richard N. Goodwin's thought-provoking column on the alienation and sense of powerlessness that is endemic among even our educated population ("Must a Sense of Impotence Keep Our Masses Silenced?," Op-Ed Page, May 19.) Goodwin's articulate call to somehow overthrow our present smoke-and-mirrors "political" system (really a Reaganized social advertising and deception system) is marred only by his assertion that our own political leaders are "more tenuously ensconced" than those in the Soviet Union and China, and thus, more likely to heed to call of the people and enact significant reforms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1993 | RICHARD N. GOODWIN, Richard N. Goodwin was an assistant special counsel to President Kennedy and a special assistant to President Johnson. He now writes in Concord, Mass.
"To everything there is a season." And without fail there will be a season to make critical, even harsh judgments on the acts and policies of President William Jefferson Clinton. But not today. For in his inaugural, Clinton met the first test of his presidency with dignity and understanding. An inaugural address, like most political speeches, is not a literary composition but an event. It is not designed for inclusion in anthologies, but to accomplish a fairly immediate purpose.
BOOKS
September 25, 1988 | Jim Miller, Miller is the author of "Democracy Is in the Streets: From Port Huron to the Siege of Chicago" (Simon & Schuster). and
Once a White House insider under Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson, later an influential outsider and critic of the war in Vietnam, Richard Goodwin has written a flawed but fascinating kind of political Bildungsroman .
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
Richard N. Goodwin has grown bored with the questions about why he wrote such mean things about Lyndon Baines Johnson. "I'm not saying anything mean about Johnson," Goodwin said in an interview in his living room here. His voice was less testy than resigned; this was not the first time he had been asked about his iconoclasm, and he was not the first person to write that Johnson was difficult or that he sometimes received guests while seated on the toilet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1985
Richard N. Goodwin's article (Editorial Pages, Oct. 31), "Beware the Tyranny of the Righteous," advances the puzzling argument that Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III is wielding power illegitimately when he addresses constitutional issues. "His job is to enforce the laws, not to make them: to obey the mandates of Constitution and Congress, not evade them by selecting those he likes and those he finds disagreeable." It is puzzling, to say the least, how one is to be expected to "obey the mandates" of the Constitution, yet refrain from discussing the nature of constitutional interpretation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1986
Congratulations and thank you for the excellent column by Richard N. Goodwin. Finally the story of the real state of the nation is told! We need more news items and columns about the poor, sick, homeless, hungry and/or helpless in this country. It is a disgrace that we have the poverty and hunger and inadequate health care that exists in this country--since it is, overall, a wealthy country. And the politicos of all stripes fear to tackle in a meaningful way these domestic problems.
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