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OPINION
January 1, 2006
Re "Iraq and the fortunes of war," Opinion, Dec. 27 The absurd equivocation by the idealistic supporters of the invasion of Iraq is pathetic. Richard N. Haass now lectures: "Sometimes in foreign policy, it is more important to avoid catastrophe than it is to reach for perfection. This is one of those times." In other words, the naive, immoral militarism of the administration is proving to be a disaster, but Bush supporters can keep their jingoism alive by defining victory as the absence of some self-defined "catastrophe."
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OPINION
September 12, 2010 | Doyle McManus
Our 9-year-old war in Afghanistan has long had its critics. But now, a number of former officials who once supported the war — or were at least willing to give the U.S. military time to see if it could be won — are questioning whether the benefit of stabilizing Afghanistan is worth the daunting cost. The doubters include Richard N. Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, the closest thing the United States has to an official "foreign policy establishment"; Leslie H. Gelb, his predecessor; and Robert D. Blackwill, a former aide to President George W. Bush.
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OPINION
September 12, 2010 | Doyle McManus
Our 9-year-old war in Afghanistan has long had its critics. But now, a number of former officials who once supported the war — or were at least willing to give the U.S. military time to see if it could be won — are questioning whether the benefit of stabilizing Afghanistan is worth the daunting cost. The doubters include Richard N. Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, the closest thing the United States has to an official "foreign policy establishment"; Leslie H. Gelb, his predecessor; and Robert D. Blackwill, a former aide to President George W. Bush.
OPINION
January 1, 2006
Re "Iraq and the fortunes of war," Opinion, Dec. 27 The absurd equivocation by the idealistic supporters of the invasion of Iraq is pathetic. Richard N. Haass now lectures: "Sometimes in foreign policy, it is more important to avoid catastrophe than it is to reach for perfection. This is one of those times." In other words, the naive, immoral militarism of the administration is proving to be a disaster, but Bush supporters can keep their jingoism alive by defining victory as the absence of some self-defined "catastrophe."
BOOKS
November 29, 1987 | Gregg Herken, Herken is Mellon Visiting Professor at Cal Tech and author most recently of "Counsels of War" (Knopf). and
Military historian B. H. Liddell-Hart used to tweak the sensibilities of platitudinous colleagues by writing of "turning points in history--where history refused to turn." With a Soviet-American treaty apparently about to be signed banning intermediate-range missiles in Europe, the modern history of arms control may be approaching such a fateful intersection. But it remains to be seen whether history--a juggernaut whose motive force is often irony--will make the curve. "Superpower Arms Control" is a scholarly account of earlier efforts to limit the number and/or threat of nuclear weapons.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2010
SATURDAY Good Morning America (N) 7 a.m. KABC McLaughlin Group 6:30 p.m. KCET SUNDAY Today Chelsea Clinton's wedding; Bill Clegg. (N) 6 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America (N) 6 a.m. KABC State of the Union Race in America: Christopher Edley, UC Berkeley Law School; John McWhorter. President Obama and the business community: Mort Zuckerman; Steve Forbes. 6 and 9 a.m. CNN CBS News Sunday Morning Wayne Newton. (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Fareed Zakaria GPS Afghanistan and Pakistan: U.S. special representative Richard C. Holbrooke.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2011
SATURDAY Good Morning America (N) 7 a.m. KABC The Chris Matthews Show Richard Stengel; John Heilemann; Helene Cooper; Katty Kay. (N) 5 p.m.; Sun. 5:30 a.m. KNBC McLaughlin Group 6:30 p.m. KCET SUNDAY Good Morning America (N) 6 a.m. KABC State of the Union Obama campaign strategy; the economy; 2012 GOP field: Obama's campaign advisor David Axelrod. State economies; 2012 election: Gov. Bob McDonnell (R-Va.); Gov. Martin O'Malley (D-Md.). (N) 6 and 9 a.m. CNN CBS News Sunday Morning President Barack Obama.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - It didn't take long for former Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner to land a new job, and it's not on Wall Street, though it's in the same area code. The Council on Foreign Relations, a nonpartisan think tank in New York, said Wednesday that Geithner would become its newest senior fellow this month. He stepped down as Treasury secretary Jan. 25. President Obama has nominated White House Chief of Staff Jacob J. Lew to replace him. Geithner has followed this route before.
OPINION
November 30, 2010 | Jonah Goldberg
Washington is reeling from the latest WikiLeaks document dump. The foreign policy wonks insist that there are few, if any, major surprises. "Much of what we've seen thus far," opined Richard N. Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, "confirms more than it informs. " And, in the end, what these documents confirm is that President Obama's foreign policy is a mess. Even if you're supportive of Obama's foreign policy efforts, the WikiLeaks dump is a bigger deal than the know-it-alls are suggesting.
WORLD
July 7, 2003 | Sonni Efron, Times Staff Writer
As the State Department's top policy wonk, Richard N. Haass clashed frequently with the right wing of the U.S. foreign policy establishment. A veteran of four administrations, Haass, a moderate Republican, found himself counseling caution on the use of military force and advocating international coalition building on hot-button issues such as Iran and North Korea.
BOOKS
November 29, 1987 | Gregg Herken, Herken is Mellon Visiting Professor at Cal Tech and author most recently of "Counsels of War" (Knopf). and
Military historian B. H. Liddell-Hart used to tweak the sensibilities of platitudinous colleagues by writing of "turning points in history--where history refused to turn." With a Soviet-American treaty apparently about to be signed banning intermediate-range missiles in Europe, the modern history of arms control may be approaching such a fateful intersection. But it remains to be seen whether history--a juggernaut whose motive force is often irony--will make the curve. "Superpower Arms Control" is a scholarly account of earlier efforts to limit the number and/or threat of nuclear weapons.
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