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Richard Natale

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1995
I read with great interest Richard Natale's article on "Just a License to Make Money?" (March 5). Licensing by the Walt Disney Co. goes back to the early days of Mickey Mouse. However, the article is not correct in its list of the last four Disney animated films. There was a film between "The Little Mermaid" and "Beauty and the Beast." It was the non-musical film "The Rescuers Down Under." LOUIS BOISH Irvine
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2002
I stopped reading movie reviews a few years ago because more than once, too much was revealed for me in advance. Now, it looks as if I might have to avoid articles that give away too much in a caption. Some readers might want to stop here. Richard Natale's article ("Embracing Parents' Pain," Feb. 3) had the sub-headline: "From 'In the Bedroom' to 'Monster's Ball,' a spate of films about the once-taboo topic of a child's death explores families' complex reactions." I saw "Monster's Ball," and the child's death did not occur until about one-third of the way through the film.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2002
I stopped reading movie reviews a few years ago because more than once, too much was revealed for me in advance. Now, it looks as if I might have to avoid articles that give away too much in a caption. Some readers might want to stop here. Richard Natale's article ("Embracing Parents' Pain," Feb. 3) had the sub-headline: "From 'In the Bedroom' to 'Monster's Ball,' a spate of films about the once-taboo topic of a child's death explores families' complex reactions." I saw "Monster's Ball," and the child's death did not occur until about one-third of the way through the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2000
Re "Oscar Handicapping Gets Down to Business" (by Richard Natale, Nov. 18): Natale's article mentions some obvious Academy Award candidates, but I'd like to call attention to two gems that should be considered for best film, director, writing and acting nominations: "You Can Count on Me" and "What's Cooking?" These two very small, independently made films about believable people, their behavior and relationships put Hollywood to shame. And for the price of one "Charlie's Angels," 50 more films of this quality can be made.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2000
Re "Oscar Handicapping Gets Down to Business" (by Richard Natale, Nov. 18): Natale's article mentions some obvious Academy Award candidates, but I'd like to call attention to two gems that should be considered for best film, director, writing and acting nominations: "You Can Count on Me" and "What's Cooking?" These two very small, independently made films about believable people, their behavior and relationships put Hollywood to shame. And for the price of one "Charlie's Angels," 50 more films of this quality can be made.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2000
Hollywood has once again passed up an opportunity to practice what it proposes to preach. In the past few years, people of color have made it well known that Hollywood has rested on its laurels when it comes to hiring actors from all walks of life to appear in its films and television shows. In the upcoming film "Pay It Forward," there was a perfect and built-in opportunity to hire a black actor to portray a positive role model ("No, It's Not Too Early to Start Talking Oscar," by Richard Natale, Sept.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1999
This report is based on projections of total U.S. box-office gross from a consensus of industry sources and studio financial models. The U.S. returns represent only 20% of a film's final revenue, which includes income from video, TV and overseas theatrical. Typical industry marketing costs are factored into this profit analysis, as is the relative strength of specific film genres in foreign markets. Results for the weekend of Dec. 10-12: "The Green Mile" should be a major profit maker for Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2002
Now I know why producers are regarded as Philistines. In the article about "Rollerball," ("The Way 'Rollerball' Bounces," by Richard Natale, Feb. 6), Charles Roven says removing a Rebecca Romijn-Stamos nude scene was "not radical"? Duuuuuude! DICK EAGLESON Gardena
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2000
Hollywood has once again passed up an opportunity to practice what it proposes to preach. In the past few years, people of color have made it well known that Hollywood has rested on its laurels when it comes to hiring actors from all walks of life to appear in its films and television shows. In the upcoming film "Pay It Forward," there was a perfect and built-in opportunity to hire a black actor to portray a positive role model ("No, It's Not Too Early to Start Talking Oscar," by Richard Natale, Sept.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2000
This report is based on projections of total U.S. box-office gross from a consensus of industry sources and studio financial models. The U.S. returns represent only 20% of a film's final revenue, which includes income from video, TV and overseas theatrical release. Typical industry marketing costs are factored into this profit analysis, as are the relative strengths of specific film genres in foreign markets. Results for the weekend of April 7-9: Highlights: - Paramount, which paid for less than half the budget on "Rules of Engagement" in return for domestic rights and select foreign territories, should make some money on the drama, though competitors speculate Paramount is understating the film's budget.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1995
I read with great interest Richard Natale's article on "Just a License to Make Money?" (March 5). Licensing by the Walt Disney Co. goes back to the early days of Mickey Mouse. However, the article is not correct in its list of the last four Disney animated films. There was a film between "The Little Mermaid" and "Beauty and the Beast." It was the non-musical film "The Rescuers Down Under." LOUIS BOISH Irvine
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