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Richard Neutra

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2012 | By Mike Reicher, Los Angeles Times
Newport Beach officials recently ordered a real estate investor to stop gutting the interior of an office building designed by celebrated Modernist architect Richard Neutra. It is the latest dispute concerning the Mariners Medical Arts building, a sleek 1963 complex at 1901 Westcliff Drive saved from demolition in 2009. Preservationist John Linnert, a Costa Mesa architect, noticed crews working on the upstairs interior in January and reported them to the city planning staff.
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NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Lisa Boone
The Los Angeles edition of the Architecture & Design Film Festival kicks off its five-day salute to art, architecture, design, fashion and urban planning Wednesday with showings of "If You Build It," "Design Is One: Massimo & Leila Vignelli" and "16 Acres. " The L.A. film festival, running through Sunday, will feature 30 recent feature-length and short films from around the world. "There is something for everyone who likes design at the festival," said the festival's founder and director, architect Kyle Bergman.
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MAGAZINE
March 7, 1999
Richard Neutra tends to get all the credit for his architectural projects while his collaborators often go unmentioned ("Neutra, Big Man on Campus," by Cathy Curtis, So SoCal, Feb 7). I was his partner for the last 30 years of his life and participated in many of the projects for which he gets solo credit--including the auditorium pictured with Curtis' article. Also, his partner, Robert Alexander, who introduced him to that campus, should have been included in that photo caption. Readers interested in the current state of the Neutra practice can find some interesting materials displayed on our Web site at http://www.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2014 | By Marisa Gerber
In one of his earliest boyhood memories, Dion Neutra walked out the front door of his family's Silver Lake home and down to the water's edge. It was the early 1930s, and the wall around Silver Lake Reservoir was so low that he could fling a fishing line above it and into the water. But over the next eight decades, the architect - who trained under his father, Richard Neutra, a master of Modernism who lived and worked out of Silver Lake - watched as the water he loved began to change.
NEWS
October 30, 1993
Regula Thorston Fybel, executive secretary and aide to her late brother-in-law, famed architect Richard Neutra, and a resident of his highly publicized three-family house in Hollywood, has died. She was 86. Mrs. Fybel died Oct. 22 in Los Angeles after a stroke, said her nephew, Raymond Neutra of Berkeley. Born in Switzerland, Mrs. Fybel was trained in Paris as a nurse.
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To really appreciate the buildings designed by the late architect Richard J. Neutra, you've got to stop looking at them. The important thing is the feel inside. Neutra devotees say that is what best shows his ideal: A home, even a tiny one, can make its harried urban inhabitants happier and healthier by keeping them close to nature. "Architecture is more than making a statement from the street.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | AMY LOUISE KAZMIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The late architect Richard Neutra designed his home in Silver Lake as a personal expression of his belief that living in a small space need not be a claustrophobic, confining experience. He proved his point. Covered outdoor terraces blur the lines between indoors and outdoors. Strategically placed mirrors confuse the eye, giving an illusion of vast space. Glass walls and huge windows allow natural light to stream in.
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | AMY LOUISE KAZMIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The late architect Richard Neutra designed his home in Silver Lake as a personal expression of his belief that living in a small space need not be a claustrophobic, confining experience. He proved his point. Covered outdoor terraces blur the lines between indoors and outdoors. Strategically placed mirrors confuse the eye, giving an illusion of vast space. Glass walls and huge windows allow natural light to stream in.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1997 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, TIMES ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Even a down-on-his-luck architect deserves humane housing. When the budding Modernist hero Richard Neutra built a home along Silver Lake Reservoir in 1932, he had a budget of $10,000 and a tiny sliver of land. What he built became a nimble experiment in urban living. That experiment burned down 30 years ago, only to be replaced by a more elaborate version that Neutra designed with his son, Dion. On Jan.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2013 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
The Richard Neutra-designed Singleton House in Bel-Air has sold for $16.5 million. Hair industry magnate Vidal Sassoon and his wife, Rhonda, bought the Midcentury Modern style home in 2004 for $6 million, according to public records. The renovated 6,400-square-foot house sits on 5.2 acres with a swimming pool and spa. A path of concrete steppingstones continues over a reflecting pond to terrace space by the pool. Features include expanses of glass walls, a media room, four bedrooms and five bathrooms.
NEWS
September 27, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
The first time Jack Latner's Hollywood Hills house was remodeled years ago, the big design move was an addition built literally around a spectacular 70-year-old sycamore tree: The trunk rose up from the floor and through the ceiling. “It was the best space in the house,” said Latner, 31, adding that guests naturally gravitated to the novel space. “But it was also my bedroom. I thought, 'Let's turn this room into the main feature of the house. This is where we are going to be spending most of our time.'” So for another remodel, Latner turned to Aaron Neubert , the Silver Lake architect who designed the first addition.
NEWS
August 15, 2013 | By Scarlet Cheng
When Alan Pullman first drove by the Raphael Soriano house, a small Modernist gem in the Alamitos Heights section of Long Beach, he turned to his wife, Stephanie, and said: "That's my house, I'm going to live in that house. " The sleek white split-level had horizontal ribbons of metal casement windows that ran along upper and lower floors. Even with the ground-floor curtains closed, Alan Pullman, an architect, could tell the design carried the line of sight past the front windows, into the living room and through to the backyard.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2013 | By Liesl Bradner
If you stand on the corner of 4th and Spring streets in downtown, it's possible to view sections of at least 12 buildings designed by John Parkinson: the Los Angeles Theatre Center (formerly Security National Bank), the Title Insurance building and the city's first palatial hotel, the Spanish Renaissance-style Alexandria Hotel, to name a few. Oddly, the architect's name is not widely known, but his landmark structures - Los Angeles City Hall, Union Station, the L.A. Memorial Coliseum and Bullocks Wilshire - have defined the city's skyline since the early 20th century.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2013 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
The Richard Neutra-designed Singleton House in Bel-Air has sold for $16.5 million. Hair industry magnate Vidal Sassoon and his wife, Rhonda, bought the Midcentury Modern style home in 2004 for $6 million, according to public records. The renovated 6,400-square-foot house sits on 5.2 acres with a swimming pool and spa. A path of concrete steppingstones continues over a reflecting pond to terrace space by the pool. Features include expanses of glass walls, a media room, four bedrooms and five bathrooms.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2012 | By Scott Timberg
The scene could come from a Sofia Coppola movie: Coolly casual Parisian artist, hanging artwork in a stunning Modernist house overlooking the Silver Lake Reservoir, while a clutch of young, European-accented hipsters with cameras and video recorders swarm around him to capture his every utterance. Before long, new music composed by a member of the electronica band Air drifts across the place. But unlike in "Lost in Translation" or "Somewhere,"this is a set on which it's possible to trip over a large aluminum sculpture of California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2012 | By Mike Reicher, Los Angeles Times
Newport Beach officials recently ordered a real estate investor to stop gutting the interior of an office building designed by celebrated Modernist architect Richard Neutra. It is the latest dispute concerning the Mariners Medical Arts building, a sleek 1963 complex at 1901 Westcliff Drive saved from demolition in 2009. Preservationist John Linnert, a Costa Mesa architect, noticed crews working on the upstairs interior in January and reported them to the city planning staff.
HOME & GARDEN
August 22, 2009 | David A. Keeps
Architects in Southern California often look to the indoor-outdoor designs of the late trailblazing modernist Richard Neutra for inspiration. John Bertram need not look far. The 43-year-old principal of Bertram Architects lives in a Neutra: the 1939 McIntosh house. Waking up every morning in a house designed by the architect who has most influenced him has been a boon for Bertram, whose portfolio includes million-dollar restorations and renovations of four historic Neutra homes, including the Brown house in Bel-Air owned by former Gucci designer Tom Ford.
NEWS
February 17, 1991
I would like to take issue with your Architecture column of Feb. 7. While I was pleased to see the Schindler House written about and pictured, I was dismayed by the writer's contention that the arrival of Richard and Dione Neutra "turned the house into a battleground." I am the sister of Dione Neutra and joined them at 835 Kings Road for two years starting in 1929. I remember a family living in harmony and wonderful evening sessions with meaningful conversation among the intelligentsia of the period, interspersed with music and dance renditions.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2011
Expanded and restored last decade, the Sidney R. Troxell House designed by Modernist architect Richard Neutra retains its midcentury qualities. The post-and-beam structure has floor-to-ceiling windows and is sited to take in views of the ocean, city and mountains. The details Location: 766 Paseo Miramar, Pacific Palisades 90272 Asking price: $3.95 million Year built: 1956 House size: Four bedrooms, 21/2 bathrooms, 3,044 square feet Lot size: 1.09 acres Features: Heated swimming pool, patio, breakfast bar, fireplace, alarm system.
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