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Richard Neutra

MAGAZINE
March 7, 1993 | MICHAEL WEBB
If you like the cool geometry of classic modern furniture and want something fresher than the European standards, check out some newly reissued designs by architect Richard Neutra, who came to Los Angeles from Vienna in 1925 and worked here until his death in 1970. The revival was sparked by designer Terry Phipps, who rented the Neutra family's guest house in Silver Lake eight years ago and furnished it with a few of the architect's own chairs and tables.
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MAGAZINE
February 7, 1999 | Cathy Curtis
The elegant roue, Pierce Patchett, of "L.A. Confidential," likely would have raised an eyebrow at the very idea that the Austrian emigre modernist who designed his futuristic 1929 steel-and-glass hideaway in Los Feliz would ever work on a community college.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1992 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Here's an unusual way to celebrate the centennial of the birth of a creative genius: Get a wrecking ball and demolish one of his creations; then, open a joyful exhibition to praise him. Odd, yes. But, it's precisely the sequence of events at UCLA in its effort to mark the life of Richard Neutra (1892-1970), the Viennese-born, Los Angeles-based architect who ranks among the greatest International Style designers of the 20th Century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2010 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Max Lawrence, a successful meatpacker whose appreciation of midcentury modern design led him to co-found Architectural Pottery, an influential Los Angeles company that produced sculptural planters and urns coveted by collectors today, died of natural causes July 25 at his Los Angeles home, said his son, Damon. He was 98. Lawrence founded Architectural Pottery in 1950 with his wife, Rita, whose business and aesthetic savvy helped the company thrive for more than three decades. Showcasing the talents of potters such as David Cressey, John Follis and Rex Goode, they sold their creations to the vanguard of the modernist architecture movement that took root in Southern California in the post- World War II era. "Their role in establishing the unique look of midcentury California design can't be overstated.
NEWS
September 27, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
The first time Jack Latner's Hollywood Hills house was remodeled years ago, the big design move was an addition built literally around a spectacular 70-year-old sycamore tree: The trunk rose up from the floor and through the ceiling. “It was the best space in the house,” said Latner, 31, adding that guests naturally gravitated to the novel space. “But it was also my bedroom. I thought, 'Let's turn this room into the main feature of the house. This is where we are going to be spending most of our time.'” So for another remodel, Latner turned to Aaron Neubert , the Silver Lake architect who designed the first addition.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Postmodernism began in architecture in the '70s, when it was decreed once and for all that modernism--with its flat-topped, rectangular compositions, resistance to ornamentation and brainy "strategies"--had worn out its welcome. Now it seems that postmodernism is having its own travails. What goes around comes home again. The restraint and focus of the moderns suddenly begins to look appealing after a period of fashionable pluralism. Take the case of Richard Neutra, who died in 1970.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2013 | By Liesl Bradner
If you stand on the corner of 4th and Spring streets in downtown, it's possible to view sections of at least 12 buildings designed by John Parkinson: the Los Angeles Theatre Center (formerly Security National Bank), the Title Insurance building and the city's first palatial hotel, the Spanish Renaissance-style Alexandria Hotel, to name a few. Oddly, the architect's name is not widely known, but his landmark structures - Los Angeles City Hall, Union Station, the L.A. Memorial Coliseum and Bullocks Wilshire - have defined the city's skyline since the early 20th century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1986 | LARRY GORDON, Times Staff Writer
Dione Neutra is used to the world knocking on her front door. Her home on the eastern shore of the Silver Lake reservoir is a landmark of modernist design, a shrine to the international set and to her late husband, architect Richard Neutra, whose remains are buried in the backyard.
REAL ESTATE
April 5, 1992 | DIANE KANNER and FRED CHRISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Kanner and Chriss are collaborating on a six-part public television series on Los Angeles architecture. and
Spanish-style architecture was as hot as a tamale in 1928 Los Angeles. With its red-tile roofs and arched windows, the style satisfied the romantic vision newcomers expected of Southern California homes. So imagine the shock of neighbors and critics alike when, in that same year, a stark steel-and-glass spaceship of a house went up virtually overnight in the Hollywood Hills.
REAL ESTATE
September 6, 1992 | EVELYN DE WOLFE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Events honoring architect Richard J. Neutra's 100th birthday are continuing at USC's Watt Hall with four remaining symposiums on Wednesday and Sept. 14, 21 and 28, held concurrently with the "Neutra Architecture--The View from the Inside," exhibit at the university's Helen Lindhurst galleries.
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