Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRichard Nixon
IN THE NEWS

Richard Nixon

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
March 12, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Richard Nixon sure had a way with his lady. The nation's 37th president married his wife, Pat, after a courtship that was marked by love letters in which the two flirted the old-fashioned way: via pen and paper. Nixon called her his "dearest heart" and his "Irish gypsy" in newly unveiled love letters going on display Friday at the Nixon Presidential Library & Museum in Yorba Linda. The exhibit honors First Lady Pat Nixon on what would have been her 100th birthday.  "Every day and every night I want to see you and be with you," Nixon wrote in one letter.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Award-winning producer-writer-director George Schlatter is a kind of P.T. Barnum of the small screen. An innovative showman, the 81-year-old Schlatter turned the comedy genre on its head with the hip, groundbreaking series "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In" (1968-73) and helped usher in the reality show format with "Real People" (1979-84) But that's not all, folks. He also created the "American Comedy Awards," produced countless TV specials, including "A Party for Richard Pryor" and "Sinatra: 80 Years My Way," and earned more than a few honors for his work, including Emmys and Golden Globes.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1990
Former President Nixon has proven that a nation's worst nightmare can become the "American Dream." JEROLD DRUCKER Tarzana
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Hillel Italie
Joe McGinniss, the adventurous and news-making author and reporter who skewered the marketing of Richard Nixon in "The Selling of the President 1968" and tracked his personal journey from sympathizer to scourge of convicted killer Jeffrey MacDonald in the blockbuster "Fatal Vision," died Monday at a hospital in Worcester, Mass. He was 71. McGinniss died from complications of prostate cancer, according to his attorney and longtime friend Dennis Holahan. Few journalists of his time so intrepidly pursued a story, burned so many bridges or more memorably placed themselves in the narrative, whether insisting on the guilt of MacDonald after seemingly befriending him or moving next door to Sarah Palin's house for a most unauthorized biography of the former Alaska governor and Republican vice presidential candidate.
OPINION
January 6, 2013 | By Bill Whalen
A century ago on Jan. 9, Richard Nixon was born in a Southern California agricultural subdivision dubbed Yorba Linda, in a 900-square-foot mail-order house assembled by his father. The centennial of America's 37th president won't be met with much fanfare beyond this weekend's wreath-laying at that home and a Nixon Foundation dinner Wednesday in Washington. Although the Nixon Library has other centennial-related events planned for 2013, there's little of the hoopla that accompanied the 100th birthday of California's other president, Ronald Reagan, two years ago. Like another former Republican president, Nixon is a victim of unfortunate political timing.
WORLD
May 4, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - “He would be amazed,” exclaimed Christopher Nixon Cox, digging into a plate of fried rice over lunch in a starkly modern restaurant with black-clad waiters and white walls at the foot of the Great Wall of China. Cox was referring to his grandfather, Richard Nixon, whose 1972 trip to China he is retracing. Although the 34-year-old investment banker has been to China 15 times, he was channeling what he imagined would have been the late president's awe four decades after that historic visit at seeing the skyscrapers, the bumper-to-bumper freeways, the fashions and other obvious manifestations of rising affluence.
NEWS
April 27, 1994
"We think sometimes when things don't go the right way, when we suffer a defeat, that all has ended. Not true. It is only a beginning, always. Greatness comes not when things always go good for you, but the greatness comes when you are really tested, when you take some knocks, some disappointments, when sadness comes. Because only if you have been in the deepest valley can you ever know how magnificent it is to be on the highest mountain.... Always give your best.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | ROGER SIMON
How would you like to be chairman of the Republican Party? It pays well. You get a company car. The President calls you by your first name. And every morning, you get to walk Millie. So how come nobody wants the job? When George Bush was elected President just a little more than two years ago, the GOP looked unbeatable for the foreseeable future. Yet today, the party is in disarray. It is floundering, leaderless, adrift. Part of the problem is the illness of Lee Atwater.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | Researched by APRIL JACKSON, JANICE L. JONES and CAROLINE LEMKE / Los Angeles Times
There are 36 Presidents buried in 17 states and Washington, D.C. Richard Nixon is the only one buried in California. Although seven of them have presidential libraries, only five of them are buried there. A chronological review of Presidents, through Nixon, and particulars about their gravesites: Number of Presidents Buried by State More Presidents are buried in Virginia, New York and Ohio than any other state. A quick look at where presidents are buried, and how many there are, by state.
NATIONAL
November 8, 2013 | By David Horsey
President Obama's hollow promise that Americans who liked their own healthcare plans would not have to give them up under Obamacare may prove to be another tempest in a tea party teapot, but it might also balloon into a political gale that blows away the highest hopes for his second term in the White House.  Winning reelection to the presidency is often a triumph before a fall. Richard Nixon won a second term in a landslide; two years later, the Watergate scandal forced him to resign.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | By Susan Brenneman, This post has been corrected as noted below.
The Saturday Night Massacre was a scorched-earth moment in the Watergate affair. On Oct. 20, 1973, the two highest-ranking members of the Justice Department, Atty. Gen. Elliot L. Richardson and his deputy, William D. Ruckelshaus, quit rather than follow President Nixon's order to fire Special Prosecutor Archibald Cox. Cox and the courts were pressing the president to release White House tape recordings that might shed light on whether he had a role in covering up a break-in at Democratic Party headquarters in Washington's Watergate office complex.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
Audiotape of a casual phone conversation in the new documentary "Our Nixon" reveals a startling fact about President Nixon and his staff: that they were unfamiliar with the most popular television program in America at the time, "All in the Family. " In the call, White House chief of staff H.R. Haldeman seemed to think the influential sitcom was a panel show, and Nixon thought it was a movie that villainized a "square hard hat" (Archie Bunker). Forty-one years after the Watergate scandal first broke, the seemingly prosaic detail about the Nixon White House's lack of pop culture awareness provides the kind of context that often gets lost when the first draft of history is written.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2013 | Steve Chawkins
David Frost badgered statesmen and made small talk with stars, but one exchange towered over all the others in his 50-year career. "You've explained how you have got caught up in this thing," he told Richard Nixon in his famous 1977 TV interviews with the disgraced former president. "You've explained your motives: I don't want to quibble about any of that. But just coming to the substance: Would you go further than 'mistakes' -- the word that seems not enough for people?" Nixon -- three years after stepping down from office in the wake of Watergate -- astonished the unflappably British Frost by appearing to acknowledge that "mistakes" may have been too mild a term.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2013 | By Jason Wells
The final installment of 94 White House tapes recorded during a turbulent period of Richard Nixon's administration were released Wednesday at the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in Yorba Linda. The tapes cover a period from April 9 to July 12, 1973, as Watergate was bearing down on the administration. Included in the hours of secretly taped conversations are discussions of the Vietnam War peace settlement and the return of prisoners of war, tensions over “most favored nation” trade status for the Soviet Union and other key foreign policy issues of the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
The Writers Guild of America might think of “All in the Family” as the second-greatest sitcom of all time , after “Seinfeld,” but were he alive today, Richard Nixon would almost certainly disagree. As “Our Nixon,” a new documentary airing Thursday night on CNN makes clear, the late president was no fan of the Norman Lear sitcom and its gay-friendly agenda. The film, which made the festival rounds earlier this year, is pieced together from over 500 reels of silent, Super 8 footage shot by three of Richard Nixon's closest aides -- H.R. Haldeman, John D. Ehrlichman and Dwight Chapin -- and seized by the FBI following the Watergate scandal.
WORLD
May 4, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - “He would be amazed,” exclaimed Christopher Nixon Cox, digging into a plate of fried rice over lunch in a starkly modern restaurant with black-clad waiters and white walls at the foot of the Great Wall of China. Cox was referring to his grandfather, Richard Nixon, whose 1972 trip to China he is retracing. Although the 34-year-old investment banker has been to China 15 times, he was channeling what he imagined would have been the late president's awe four decades after that historic visit at seeing the skyscrapers, the bumper-to-bumper freeways, the fashions and other obvious manifestations of rising affluence.
OPINION
March 13, 2013
Re "Dueling over Watergate," Postscript, March 9 Few people touch on the single element of the Watergate scandal that I consider the most serious. Though I doubt that Richard Nixon knew about the break-in beforehand, his White House fostered an atmosphere of privilege and entitlement in which such a crime could be thought of as acceptable - a crime that was, at its core, tantamount to treason. The Watergate burglars were trying to steal the 1972 election by stealing information from the Democratic National Committee.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|