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Richard Nixon Foundation

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TRAVEL
February 20, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times staff writer
First published on Feb. 20, 2011. Revised and expanded in January 2012. South of Los Angeles and north of San Diego lies an intermittently magical 789-square-mile realm where freeways hum and Disneyland flourishes, where immigrants remake old communities as new ones ripple across the hills. Many outsiders treat this place as they would a prosperous but hopelessly dull relative -- the way some Europeans treat Belgium. Let's remember, people, that Belgium has given us centuries of good waffles, beer and chocolate, not to mention the French fry and Jean-Claude Van Damme.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2013 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
Paul J. Carter was 9 when Richard M. Nixon resigned the presidency in 1974, watching the televised speech with his dad, a loyal Republican who had come home from work early for the event. "I … didn't grasp the magnitude of it," said Carter, now 47 and a lawyer in Long Beach. Nearly four decades later, the boy's puzzlement over the nation's 37th president had evolved into a grown-up project, "Native Son Richard Nixon's Southern California: My Life on a Map!" Made like a guide to Hollywood stars' homes, the fold-out map is an illustrated romp through the life of the only White House occupant born and raised in Southern California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2012 | Paloma Esquivel
Hers are concise notes, funny and practical; his are lengthy, flowery and eager. "Somehow on Tuesday there was something electric in the usually almost stifling air in Whittier," Richard Nixon wrote to Patricia Ryan in an undated letter written during their courtship. "And now I know. An Irish gypsy who radiates all that is happy and beautiful was there. " The letter and others exchanged between Nixon and the woman who would become his wife of 53 years will be on display at the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in Yorba Linda during the next several months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2012 | Paloma Esquivel
Hers are concise notes, funny and practical; his are lengthy, flowery and eager. "Somehow on Tuesday there was something electric in the usually almost stifling air in Whittier," Richard Nixon wrote to Patricia Ryan in an undated letter written during their courtship. "And now I know. An Irish gypsy who radiates all that is happy and beautiful was there. " The letter and others exchanged between Nixon and the woman who would become his wife of 53 years will be on display at the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in Yorba Linda during the next several months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1994 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are tape-recorded oral history interviews, numbering in the hundreds and containing some answers to the mystery that was Richard Nixon. But they remain under lock and key, bound up in boxes, accessible to no one. Not even the late President's daughters are allowed to hear them. They can be found here, in a regional office of the National Archives. But the government has them sealed, leaving them in what the agency's Washington spokeswoman calls "legal limbo." No one sees any end to the ongoing dispute that has the effect of keeping the tapes frozen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2013 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
Paul J. Carter was 9 when Richard M. Nixon resigned the presidency in 1974, watching the televised speech with his dad, a loyal Republican who had come home from work early for the event. "I … didn't grasp the magnitude of it," said Carter, now 47 and a lawyer in Long Beach. Nearly four decades later, the boy's puzzlement over the nation's 37th president had evolved into a grown-up project, "Native Son Richard Nixon's Southern California: My Life on a Map!" Made like a guide to Hollywood stars' homes, the fold-out map is an illustrated romp through the life of the only White House occupant born and raised in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2011 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
During his five-year overhaul of the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, Cold War historian Timothy Naftali won wide praise for transforming a much-ridiculed institution into a house of serious scholarship under the auspices of the National Archives and Records Administration. Yet nobody was surprised that the private Richard Nixon Foundation — run by fierce loyalists of the former president — didn't honor Naftali when he left as director last month to join a think tank and write a book.
TRAVEL
February 20, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times staff writer
South of Los Angeles and north of San Diego lies an intermittently magical 789-square-mile realm where freeways hum and Disneyland flourishes, where immigrants remake old communities as new ones ripple across the hills. Many outsiders treat this place as they would a prosperous but hopelessly dull relative - the way some Europeans treat Belgium. Let's remember, people, that Belgium has given us centuries of good waffles, beer and chocolate, not to mention the French fry and Jean-Claude Van Damme.
OPINION
April 2, 2011 | Patt Morrison
Timothy Naftali is the kind of learned guy you'd want on your team when you play "Trivial Pursuit" -- a game that, like Naftali, originated in Canada. But for years, his home and his career have been in and about the United States -- books and studies on espionage, counter-terrorism, the Cuban missile crisis, U.S. intelligence. And now he is director of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library. That would be the new Nixon library, the one operated under the auspices of the National Archives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2006 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Patricia Reilly Hitt, who as an assistant secretary of Health, Education and Welfare was the highest-ranking woman in President Nixon's first administration, has died. She was 87. Hitt died of natural causes Monday at her Balboa Island home, according to the Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace. The announcement noted that she had died on what would have been the late president's 93rd birthday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2011 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
During his five-year overhaul of the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, Cold War historian Timothy Naftali won wide praise for transforming a much-ridiculed institution into a house of serious scholarship under the auspices of the National Archives and Records Administration. Yet nobody was surprised that the private Richard Nixon Foundation — run by fierce loyalists of the former president — didn't honor Naftali when he left as director last month to join a think tank and write a book.
TRAVEL
February 20, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times staff writer
South of Los Angeles and north of San Diego lies an intermittently magical 789-square-mile realm where freeways hum and Disneyland flourishes, where immigrants remake old communities as new ones ripple across the hills. Many outsiders treat this place as they would a prosperous but hopelessly dull relative - the way some Europeans treat Belgium. Let's remember, people, that Belgium has given us centuries of good waffles, beer and chocolate, not to mention the French fry and Jean-Claude Van Damme.
TRAVEL
February 20, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times staff writer
First published on Feb. 20, 2011. Revised and expanded in January 2012. South of Los Angeles and north of San Diego lies an intermittently magical 789-square-mile realm where freeways hum and Disneyland flourishes, where immigrants remake old communities as new ones ripple across the hills. Many outsiders treat this place as they would a prosperous but hopelessly dull relative -- the way some Europeans treat Belgium. Let's remember, people, that Belgium has given us centuries of good waffles, beer and chocolate, not to mention the French fry and Jean-Claude Van Damme.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1994 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are tape-recorded oral history interviews, numbering in the hundreds and containing some answers to the mystery that was Richard Nixon. But they remain under lock and key, bound up in boxes, accessible to no one. Not even the late President's daughters are allowed to hear them. They can be found here, in a regional office of the National Archives. But the government has them sealed, leaving them in what the agency's Washington spokeswoman calls "legal limbo." No one sees any end to the ongoing dispute that has the effect of keeping the tapes frozen.
NEWS
July 8, 1994 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are tape-recorded oral history interviews, numbering in the hundreds and containing some answers to the mystery that was Richard Nixon. But they remain under lock and key, bound up in boxes, accessible to no one. Not even the late President's daughters are allowed to hear them. They can be found here, in a regional office of the National Archives. The government has them sealed, leaving them in what the agency's Washington spokeswoman calls "legal limbo."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2009 | Diane Haithman
They are the first Chinese men and women allowed to study Western classical music after Mao's decade-long Cultural Revolution, composers and musicians who have come to be known as Beijing Central Conservatory's "Class of 1978," named for the year they entered the school. Their memories of the preceding period in which their families were shattered and their educations truncated include breaking into Red Guard storehouses of forbidden records, books and musical scores, and listening to Western pop music smuggled in by children of diplomats.
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