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January 9, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The Dec. 21, 1970, meeting between Elvis Presley and President Nixon is the subject of an exhibit that opened at the Richard Nixon library, which would have been the singer's 72nd birthday. The free exhibit includes the outfit Elvis wore (a black velvet overcoat, gold-plated belt and black leather boots), Nixon's outfit (gray wool suit, tie and black shoes), letters and a World War II .45-caliber Colt revolver Elvis gave to Nixon.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Future historians of the Barack Obama presidency, where would you rather travel? To that perpetually sunny corner of Polynesia where our 44th president was born? Or to the windy city on Lake Michigan he most recently called home? Barack Obama's second and last term doesn't end until Jan. 20, 2017. But university officials and civil leaders in two regions are already maneuvering for the honor of hosting Obama's official presidential library. Now, according to news reports, two places have made the final cut: Chicago and Hawaii.
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MAGAZINE
August 11, 1991
The contents-page blurb for Harry Shearer's column (June 30) tells us to "skip the Loma Linda (Nixon) museum." Is something happening to our city that we need to know about? The Richard Nixon Library in Yorba Linda is a very fine exhibit, for which we can take neither blame nor credit, depending on one's point of view. ELMER J. DIGNEO Mayor , pro tempore Loma Linda
OPINION
April 2, 2011 | Patt Morrison
Timothy Naftali is the kind of learned guy you'd want on your team when you play "Trivial Pursuit" -- a game that, like Naftali, originated in Canada. But for years, his home and his career have been in and about the United States -- books and studies on espionage, counter-terrorism, the Cuban missile crisis, U.S. intelligence. And now he is director of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library. That would be the new Nixon library, the one operated under the auspices of the National Archives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1990
On Aug. 8, Daniel C. Tsang wrote to inform your readers of errors in the way items in the Richard Nixon Library and Birthplace were labeled. "The National Archives would not have committed these faux pas," he concluded. In fact, since we have not yet hired our curator and recognized that we needed the assistance of a professional to complete the gift displays, we contracted with a curatorial specialist--from the National Archives and selected by the National Archives--to oversee all labeling and display of gifts and artifacts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1994
The June 10 letter by Cal State Fullerton's Arthur Hansen was written with all the chest-thumping certitude of his profession. It was also grossly misleading. As any scholar with even a passing understanding of the history of the materials of the Nixon White House knows, it was Congress, not President Nixon, who changed the rules of ownership of those materials--so egregiously that the courts finally ruled in 1992 that he was as entitled to compensation as a property owner whose land is seized for a freeway right of way. If the President had, as the professor writes, a "lamentable penchant for confounding public with private property," it was one he shared with every President from George Washington to Lyndon Johnson.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES
The Fullerton-based Paul McNeff Singers have received two financial grants totaling $23,000. The Orange County Community Foundation has given the group an $18,000 grant, one of 31 the foundation donated to Orange County nonprofit agencies for the 1998-99 fiscal year. The Bank of America Foundation has given the group a $5,000 grant from its $1-million national initiative. Both grants will be used to support the group's Educational Outreach Ensemble and the Paul McNeff KidSingers programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1991
It's discouraging to see the apparent manipulations of the truth by those involved in operating the privately run Richard Nixon Library in Yorba Linda ("Nixon Library Delights All but Scholars," July 18). The article quotes a 12-year-old visitor as saying he had thought of Nixon as "a bad President, a cheat and a robber." But, after seeing the exhibits, he's quoted: "I thought it was cool. . . . I kinda think Nixon was made to retire because people didn't like him, so they framed him."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1993
Having never visited the Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace, I was interested in reading Anne Michaud's article (3-Hour Tour, "Nixon From the Good Side," on Sept. 30). I participated in considerable research on the Kent State slayings about 10 years ago (i.e. visiting Kent State, interviewing individuals present during the event--including the president of the school at the time, and reading extensively on the subject). I believe Michaud is wrong about Nixon ordering the National Guard to deal with the student riots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1994
Twenty-three years ago, now-retired Whittier College Prof. Carmelo Richard Arena undertook an important project to compile an oral history which included the remembrances of friends, family, and associates of Richard Milhous Nixon, 37th President of the United States and distinguished alumnus of Whittier College. Approximately 400 people took part in Dr. Arena's comprehensive work, undertaken with the intent that one day it would be available for use by historians and the interested public.
OPINION
October 5, 2009
Re "Nixon's legacy haunts his library," Oct. 1 Statues of world leaders in the Nixon library do not glorify them. They are simply a small part of U.S. history during the Nixon administration. Why now, after 20 years and thousands of visitors, because of one person's complaint, will the library be "haunted"? What about the rest of us who enjoy history? The issue is being blown way out of proportion. Nis Helmer Brea Denying the impact that President Nixon had on U.S.-Chinese diplomatic relations is denying history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2009 | Mike Anton
The statues depict two old men relaxing in easy chairs. As others mill about the drawing room, the men engage in conversation, one gesturing at the other to underscore a point. For nearly 20 years the likenesses of China's Communist leaders Mao Tse-tung and Chou En-lai have sat perfectly still inside the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in Yorba Linda. Now, they are creating a stir. They are among 10 statues of former heads of state on display in the library's World Leaders exhibit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2009 | Christopher Goffard
White House tapes released Tuesday capture Richard Nixon as a pugnacious second-term president who talks of hammering out an end to the Vietnam War even if he has to "cut off the head" of the South Vietnamese leader, remarks that an abortion might be necessary if a pregnancy involved an interracial couple and appears preoccupied with savaging his political foes. As Nixon was negotiating an end to U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The Dec. 21, 1970, meeting between Elvis Presley and President Nixon is the subject of an exhibit that opened at the Richard Nixon library, which would have been the singer's 72nd birthday. The free exhibit includes the outfit Elvis wore (a black velvet overcoat, gold-plated belt and black leather boots), Nixon's outfit (gray wool suit, tie and black shoes), letters and a World War II .45-caliber Colt revolver Elvis gave to Nixon.
SPORTS
December 21, 2006 | J.A. Adande
Admit it, the first word you think of when you hear David Eckstein's name is "short." That's OK. He uses it himself in the first sentence of his autobiography, "Have Heart." My name is David Eckstein, and you could call me a short shortstop. After last weekend, I'm ready to associate a new word with Eckstein: long. Long-term fans in Orange County. A long day of signing autographs. And when it comes to Eckstein's departure from the Angels, a long memory.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2000 | BILL MAHER
Now that the Democrats have come to Los Angeles, the people of our fair city have displayed a deep, probing curiosity for the political history beneath our feet. All right, one guy asked me in a bar, but I'm sure he speaks for millions. Most everyone I know out here didn't grow up out here, so they never heard any history of Southern California; and the people who grew up here, they don't know the history because--well, they're Californians.
OPINION
October 5, 2009
Re "Nixon's legacy haunts his library," Oct. 1 Statues of world leaders in the Nixon library do not glorify them. They are simply a small part of U.S. history during the Nixon administration. Why now, after 20 years and thousands of visitors, because of one person's complaint, will the library be "haunted"? What about the rest of us who enjoy history? The issue is being blown way out of proportion. Nis Helmer Brea Denying the impact that President Nixon had on U.S.-Chinese diplomatic relations is denying history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1994
I read with great interest your editorial "Make it a Real Gem," regarding the development of the Center for Peace and Freedom as an offshoot of the Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace. It was suggested that there will be critics who will see this as another move to "rehabilitate the reputation of the fallen president. Whatever shadows remain from the Watergate era, the Nixon presidency is taking on a far more complex character" with the passage of time, and that "old grudges have subsided."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES
The Fullerton-based Paul McNeff Singers have received two financial grants totaling $23,000. The Orange County Community Foundation has given the group an $18,000 grant, one of 31 the foundation donated to Orange County nonprofit agencies for the 1998-99 fiscal year. The Bank of America Foundation has given the group a $5,000 grant from its $1-million national initiative. Both grants will be used to support the group's Educational Outreach Ensemble and the Paul McNeff KidSingers programs.
NEWS
April 15, 1999 | From Associated Press
The Justice Department moved Wednesday to block Julie Nixon Eisenhower from testifying in a court battle over whether the government must pay her father's estate millions of dollars in compensation for papers and tapes seized when he resigned as president. The government also fought the Nixon estate's plan to have its lead attorney, R. Stan Mortenson, take the stand--a rare courtroom maneuver--in the trial that is in its 69th day.
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