Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRichard Norton Smith
IN THE NEWS

Richard Norton Smith

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1994 | SCOTT HADLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Richard Norton Smith was 5 years old, he knew all the words to "Hail to the Chief," he knew that the President of the United States was Dwight D. Eisenhower, and he knew that both he and the President were Republicans. A self-described "presidential freak," Smith, now 40, is the director of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, director of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation, and director of the Ronald Reagan Center for Public Affairs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BOOKS
July 6, 1997 | JIM SQUIRES, Jim Squires is the author of "Read All About It: The Corporate Takeover of America's Newspapers" and "Secrets of the Hopewell Box." He was the editor of the Chicago Tribune from 1980 to 1988
Among the memorabilia from my tenure as editor of the Chicago Tribune are an unusual United States map with no state of Rhode Island and a sign that once designated an elevator in the Tribune Tower lobby as being for "frate" only. Both souvenirs attest to the strangeness of the newspaper's late editor and publisher, the remarkable Col.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1994 | MACK REED
The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library will stay open late through February to accommodate an overwhelming number of visitors coming to see its World War II exhibit, library officials said. The library near Simi Valley will be open 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week until Feb. 28, when "World War II: Personal Accounts" closes, said Richard Norton Smith, library director. Smith said attendance has tripled since Dec. 3, when the exhibit opened with artifacts ranging from Douglas MacArthur's corncob pipe and Hitler's will to soldiers' wartime diaries and letters home from the front.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1994 | MACK REED
The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library will stay open late through February to accommodate an overwhelming number of visitors coming to see its World War II exhibit, library officials said. The library near Simi Valley will be open 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week until Feb. 28, when "World War II: Personal Accounts" closes, said Richard Norton Smith, library director. Smith said attendance has tripled since Dec. 3, when the exhibit opened with artifacts ranging from Douglas MacArthur's corncob pipe and Hitler's will to soldiers' wartime diaries and letters home from the front.
NEWS
October 4, 1993 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The private foundation that built the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library near here is abandoning its plans to develop a public policy think tank in favor of sponsoring more event-oriented programs with popular appeal. Officials said the recent appointment of historian and biographer Richard Norton Smith as the new director of the Reagan Center for Public Affairs represents a shift from the initial goals of the center to tackle tough public policy issues. "It's a change of focus," said John J.
BOOKS
February 21, 1993 | Robert Dawidoff, Chair of the history program at the Claremont Graduate School, Dawidoff is most recently the author of "The Genteel Tradition and the Sacred Rage" (University of North Carolina Press)
George Washington may or may not have been indispensable, but he has certainly proven inescapable. His centrality to the colonial struggle for independence from England and to the establishment of the United States of America as the successor regime to the English imperial one guarantees his continuing interest to Americans.
BOOKS
July 6, 1997 | JIM SQUIRES, Jim Squires is the author of "Read All About It: The Corporate Takeover of America's Newspapers" and "Secrets of the Hopewell Box." He was the editor of the Chicago Tribune from 1980 to 1988
Among the memorabilia from my tenure as editor of the Chicago Tribune are an unusual United States map with no state of Rhode Island and a sign that once designated an elevator in the Tribune Tower lobby as being for "frate" only. Both souvenirs attest to the strangeness of the newspaper's late editor and publisher, the remarkable Col.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1994
The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library will stay open late through February to accommodate an overwhelming number of visitors coming to see its World War II exhibit, library officials said. The library near Simi Valley will be open 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week until Feb. 28, when "World War II: Personal Accounts" closes, said Richard Norton Smith, library director. Smith said attendance has tripled since Dec.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1994
Richard Norton Smith, a historian and biographer who late last year became executive director of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and the Center for Public Affairs, will also become director of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley on Feb. 20. Smith, who has served as director of the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Dwight D. Eisenhower Center, succeeds Ralph C. Bledsoe, who has headed the Reagan library since it opened in November, 1991.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1994 | SCOTT HADLY
The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library near Simi Valley has filled up its September calendar with a list of speakers including a stalwart White House correspondent and a former Reagan chief of staff. Helen Thomas, White House correspondent for United Press International, who has covered Presidents for most of her 50 years of reporting, will speak at 11 a.m. Friday on "Living in the White House."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1994 | SCOTT HADLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Richard Norton Smith was 5 years old, he knew all the words to "Hail to the Chief," he knew that the President of the United States was Dwight D. Eisenhower, and he knew that both he and the President were Republicans. A self-described "presidential freak," Smith, now 40, is the director of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, director of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation, and director of the Ronald Reagan Center for Public Affairs.
NEWS
October 4, 1993 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The private foundation that built the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library near here is abandoning its plans to develop a public policy think tank in favor of sponsoring more event-oriented programs with popular appeal. Officials said the recent appointment of historian and biographer Richard Norton Smith as the new director of the Reagan Center for Public Affairs represents a shift from the initial goals of the center to tackle tough public policy issues. "It's a change of focus," said John J.
BOOKS
February 21, 1993 | Robert Dawidoff, Chair of the history program at the Claremont Graduate School, Dawidoff is most recently the author of "The Genteel Tradition and the Sacred Rage" (University of North Carolina Press)
George Washington may or may not have been indispensable, but he has certainly proven inescapable. His centrality to the colonial struggle for independence from England and to the establishment of the United States of America as the successor regime to the English imperial one guarantees his continuing interest to Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1994 | MATTHEW MOSK
An exhibit of high-tech inventions will come to the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum near Simi Valley later this month to show how the defense industry has adapted to the post-Cold War world. Electric buses, virtual reality and a voice-activated car navigation system will be among the high-tech fare.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|