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Richard Nunis

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July 6, 1999 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, E. Scott Reckard covers tourism for The Times. He can be reached at (714) 966-7407 and at scott.reckard@latimes.com
Disneyland has bestowed its top honor, a Main Street window, on Richard A. Nunis, who helped open the park in 1955 and became its director of operations before he took on "Project X"--developing Walt Disney World in Florida. Nunis, who eventually became chairman of Walt Disney Co.'s entire attractions division, retired in May after 44 years with Disney.
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BUSINESS
July 6, 1999 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, E. Scott Reckard covers tourism for The Times. He can be reached at (714) 966-7407 and at scott.reckard@latimes.com
Disneyland has bestowed its top honor, a Main Street window, on Richard A. Nunis, who helped open the park in 1955 and became its director of operations before he took on "Project X"--developing Walt Disney World in Florida. Nunis, who eventually became chairman of Walt Disney Co.'s entire attractions division, retired in May after 44 years with Disney.
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BUSINESS
May 28, 1989
The May 14 story, "California's Highest Paid Executives," noted that three of Walt Disney Co.'s top officers, Michael Eisner, Frank Wells and Richard Nunis, earned a total of more than $77 million 1988. Now I know why Disneyland charges such exorbitant prices for everything from rides to popcorn. Maybe I'll start spending my recreation dollars at Hilton Hotels. My heart really bled for poor Baron Hilton, who finished in 100th place with his paltry 1988 income of only $954,547. JAY T. HOLERER Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1996
Re "Self-Styled Keepers of the Magic Kingdom," Sept. 12: Those who would monitor "the suits" (Disneyland management) in order to keep the park as Walt Disney intended it might be surprised to know who those managers have had to fight in attempting to achieve that. It was once suggested, for example, that alcoholic beverages be added to the menu of a private restaurant to be built inside Disneyland, intended mainly for use by the corporate sponsors of park rides and their guests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1996
Re "Self-Styled Keepers of the Magic Kingdom," Sept. 12: Those who would monitor "the suits" (Disneyland management) in order to keep the park as Walt Disney intended it might be surprised to know who those managers have had to fight in attempting to achieve that. It was once suggested, for example, that alcoholic beverages be added to the menu of a private restaurant to be built inside Disneyland, intended mainly for use by the corporate sponsors of park rides and their guests.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1990 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walt Disney Co.'s corporate offices in Burbank may have eclipsed Disneyland as the "happiest place on earth." Every year, Disney's top executives collect their riches. Last year, they were the four highest-paid executives at California's publicly held corporations. Disney President Frank G. Wells became the state's best-paid by exercising stock options and pocketing $46.1 million. Added to his $4.8-million salary and bonus, his total compensation was nearly $51 million.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1986
Richard A. Nunis, president of the Disneyland chain of theme parks, which includes parks in Anaheim, Orlando and Tokyo, has been named a director of the holding company which controls Newport Beach-based Pacific National Bank. Nunis, a resident of Laguna Beach, was named president of Disneyland in 1980.
SPORTS
December 17, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The 1992 NBA All-Star Game was awarded to the Orlando Magic today, and Walt Disney World will add its magic touch by assuming a major role in the event. The game will be played in the 15,077-seat Orlando Arena on Feb. 9, NBA Commissioner David Stern said. Disney will be responsible for most of the three-day pageantry, player hotels and nearly 6,000 league guests, said Richard A. Nunis, president of Walt Disney Attractions.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1998 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, E. Scott Reckard covers tourism for The Times. He can be reached at (714) 966-7407 and at scott.reckard@latimes.com
Back at the Magic Kingdom, workers have been told a new president for Disneyland will be announced Jan. 19. The job has been held since 1994 by Paul Pressler, who was promoted to president of Walt Disney Attractions. Pressler, a former Disney Stores executive, will oversee theme parks and resorts worldwide in a reorganization that also put Disney's Imagineering and Regional Entertainment units into the attractions division for the first time.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1990 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walt Disney Co.'s corporate offices in Burbank may have eclipsed Disneyland as the "happiest place on earth." Every year, Disney's top executives collect their riches. Last year, they were the four highest-paid executives at California's publicly held corporations. Disney President Frank G. Wells became the state's best-paid by exercising stock options and pocketing $46.1 million. Added to his $4.8-million salary and bonus, his total compensation was nearly $51 million.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1989
The May 14 story, "California's Highest Paid Executives," noted that three of Walt Disney Co.'s top officers, Michael Eisner, Frank Wells and Richard Nunis, earned a total of more than $77 million 1988. Now I know why Disneyland charges such exorbitant prices for everything from rides to popcorn. Maybe I'll start spending my recreation dollars at Hilton Hotels. My heart really bled for poor Baron Hilton, who finished in 100th place with his paltry 1988 income of only $954,547. JAY T. HOLERER Los Angeles
BUSINESS
August 29, 1991
Richard A. Nunis has been promoted to chairman of Walt Disney Attractions, the company's resort and theme park division. Judson C. Green, Disney senior vice president and chief financial officer, will become president of the division, managing day-to-day operations of its facilities in California, Florida and Europe. The attractions segment of Disney's business has grown rapidly the past decade, but earnings have been hurt recently by a weak U.S. economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1987
It was two years ago that county Supervisor Thomas F. Riley and a small contingent of businessmen flew to Myrtle Beach, S.C., to pitch Orange County as the next location for the biennial meeting of the Medal of Honor Society. The group accepted the invitation, and it will meet beginning Thursday at the Irvine Hilton. It's the first time the society has met in Orange County.
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