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Richard Olivier

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1990 | JANICE ARKATOV
It's OK to ask Richard Olivier about his father, the legendary Laurence Olivier. He knows his name evokes curiosity, and he is more than willing to talk about "Larry." But at the moment, the 28-year-old Olivier's thoughts are fixed on Donald MacKechnie's "Meetin's on the Porch," which he is co-directing with the author at the Canon Theatre. "The characters have literally spent their whole lives in Nebraska," Olivier said of the story.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1990 | JANICE ARKATOV
It's OK to ask Richard Olivier about his father, the legendary Laurence Olivier. He knows his name evokes curiosity, and he is more than willing to talk about "Larry." But at the moment, the 28-year-old Olivier's thoughts are fixed on Donald MacKechnie's "Meetin's on the Porch," which he is co-directing with the author at the Canon Theatre. "The characters have literally spent their whole lives in Nebraska," Olivier said of the story.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1998
Astronomer Brian Marsden of the International Astronomical Union thinks that we should not worry about an asteroid striking the earth because technology will be available in 30 years to deflect it (March 12). Well, since the advent of computers in the late 1960s, how long has the government known that the year 2000 was coming and just how much preparation did they take to ward off the year 2000 millennium bug? God help us all, we just might get to see what the dinosaurs saw. RICHARD OLIVIER Chatsworth The news of asteroid 1997 XF11 brings to mind the 1949 science fiction novel "The Big Eye" by Max Ehrlich.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1986 | DON SHIRLEY
It's fun to listen to "Battery" at Second Stage. Daniel Therriault's dialogue is a ripe blend of primitive slang and advanced metaphor, dotted with enough comedy to ward off weariness and pretense. Richard Olivier's actors spit it out as if they were born to talk this way. They weren't, of course; no one was. "Battery" is a parable, a story only tenuously connected to the real world. In it, a domineering Mr. Fix-It applies homemade shock treatments to his manic-depressive assistant.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
There's no settling the matter of whether playwrights should direct their own plays. Some should, some shouldn't. But when the playwright has been primarily a director all his life you would think it might be relatively safe. When this playwright also solicits the help of another director, you would think it would be a form of production insurance. No such thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1990 | JANICE ARKATOV
Vic Tayback moves further away from the all-American Mel of "Alice's" with his role as the Lebanese immigrant Youssef Joseph in S.K. Hershewe's comedy, "An Oasis in Manhattan," opening Jan. 19 at the Venture Theatre in Burbank. "The 'oasis' is Youssef's household," explained Tayback, "and he runs it like a dictator. He loves the United States--he voted for Eisenhower, Nixon and Reagan--and thinks that freedom, education and democracy are a good idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1993 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joan Plowright and Laurence Olivier met in the cast of "The Entertainer" at London's Royal Court Theatre in 1956. They re-created their roles in the film version released in 1960. (Far from Shakespeare, it may nevertheless be Olivier's finest screen performance.) They were married in Connecticut in 1961, while starring on Broadway, he in "Becket" and she in "A Taste of Honey," for which she won a Tony.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1990 | MATT WOLF, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Britain's West End theater is having a shaky season marked by a string of flops, a reliance on American productions and little on the horizon to whet the appetite. "There's a feeling there has been a dip," says Peter Wilkins, deputy managing director of Triumph Proscenium Productions, one of the West End's busiest production companies. That's British understatement for "things have been bad."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1987 | JANICE ARKATOV
Daniel Therriault's vision of Hawaii is not the stuff of which travel brochures are made. "People don't know Hawaii," said the slim, bespectacled playwright. "They think Hawaii is Waikiki--but to the Hawaiians, Waikiki is where the tourists are. I've spent time there because my wife is blood-Hawaiian, and I was amazed to find this culture that nobody knows about. The truth is that we went in and colonized their island, completely converted their culture, their language, their way of life.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
Britain's West End theater is having a shaky season marked by a string of flops, a reliance on American productions and little on the horizon to whet the appetite. "There's a feeling there has been a dip," said Peter Wilkins, deputy managing director of Triumph Proscenium Productions, one of the West End's busiest production companies. That's British understatement for "things have been bad."
NEWS
July 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
Laurence Olivier, acclaimed as the greatest actor of his generation and the 20th-Century giant of the Shakespearean theater, died today. He was 82. The triple Oscar winner died "peacefully in his sleep," surrounded by friends and relatives at his home south of London, said his agent, Laurence Evans. The cause of death was not given. "His last few days were very peaceful," said Richard Olivier, the actor's 27-year-old son. "He died in his sleep at noon."
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