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Richard Olney

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FOOD
August 4, 1999 | RUSS PARSONS
Richard Olney, the expatriate Iowan who helped introduce a generation of Americans cooks to real French cooking, died Monday at age 73. The author of "Simple French Cooking" and "The French Menu Cookbook," as well as many others, was a prime force in educating the cooks who launched the Bay Area foodie revolution in the 1960s, the revolution that helped create California cuisine. Olney, a frustrated artist, moved to France in 1951.
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NEWS
February 13, 2005 | Paul Elias, Associated Press Writer
The shocking self-diagnosis dawned slowly but inevitably on Dr. Richard Olney, a top neurologist who had dedicated his career to helping those afflicted with the inexorably fatal Lou Gehrig's disease. Three surgeries to relieve a compressed disk in his back didn't solve the weakness that started in his right knee and spread to both legs. When his arms started to fail, he knew he was in the grips of a neurological disorder.
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FOOD
August 11, 1999 | ALICE WATERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Olney, one of the most influential cookbook writers of his generation, died at his home in Provence last week. This appreciation by Chez Panisse founder Alice Waters is adapted from her introduction to his book of memoirs, "Reflexions," which will be published in October by Brick Tower Press. * Almost 30 years ago, when I was becoming a restauratrice, one of my partners gave me a copy of Richard Olney's first book, "The French Menu Cookbook."
FOOD
August 11, 1999 | ALICE WATERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Olney, one of the most influential cookbook writers of his generation, died at his home in Provence last week. This appreciation by Chez Panisse founder Alice Waters is adapted from her introduction to his book of memoirs, "Reflexions," which will be published in October by Brick Tower Press. * Almost 30 years ago, when I was becoming a restauratrice, one of my partners gave me a copy of Richard Olney's first book, "The French Menu Cookbook."
FOOD
February 2, 1995 | LAURIE OCHOA, TIMES FOOD EDITOR
"A dreary old cliche has it that 'one should eat to live and not live to eat.' It is typical that this imbecile concept, a deliberately fruitless paradox born of the puritan mind, should deny sensuous reaction at either pole, and it is fortunate that neither pole really exists, for man is incapable of being either altogether dumbly bestial or altogether dumbly mental.'
FOOD
February 2, 1995 | LAURIE OCHOA
Where would you take two of France's most respected cooks to lunch in your hometown? Certainly not a French restaurant. What could they say, but, "Gee, it's almost as good as what you get in France." Italian food poses almost the same problem--like taking a San Diegan out for Mexican food on a trip to Australia. Steak? Maybe. But wouldn't that be feeding the old meat-and-potato stereotype that so many of our friends abroad believe about American cooking?
NEWS
February 13, 2005 | Paul Elias, Associated Press Writer
The shocking self-diagnosis dawned slowly but inevitably on Dr. Richard Olney, a top neurologist who had dedicated his career to helping those afflicted with the inexorably fatal Lou Gehrig's disease. Three surgeries to relieve a compressed disk in his back didn't solve the weakness that started in his right knee and spread to both legs. When his arms started to fail, he knew he was in the grips of a neurological disorder.
FOOD
February 24, 1994 | RUSS PARSONS, TIMES FOOD MANAGING EDITOR
Almost every recipe in every cookbook you've ever read says you must soak dried beans before you cook them. In almost every case that advice is wrong. Letting dried beans sit overnight in a bowl of cold water does nothing to improve their flavor or their texture. In fact, it does quite the opposite. While soaking shortens the unattended cooking time of beans somewhat, the time saved is marginal and there are no other labor-saving benefits.
FOOD
December 15, 1994 | KATHIE JENKINS
Anyone interested in cookbooks knows enough to hang on to anything written by M.F.K. Fisher or Elizabeth David. Their works are already considered classics. Books by the late Helen Evans Brown, Jane Grigson, Waverly Root, James Beard and Vincent Price are also very collectible. (Price's books aren't just wanted for his celebrity name, but for his recipes--they actually work.) We asked cookbook dealers to speculate which contemporary food writers might one day become classic.
OPINION
March 23, 2005
Re "Life's Work Foreshadows Doctor's Own Diagnosis," March 14: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a terrible disease, but the article implies that breathing difficulties precipitate an unalterable and inevitable end of life. Though there is no cure for ALS today, there is treatment for the symptoms, including breathing problems. Many people with ALS are extending their lives with the use of assisted ventilation. There are several options to consider when they need help breathing. Decisions should be made with one's medical team and family.
FOOD
August 4, 1999 | RUSS PARSONS
Richard Olney, the expatriate Iowan who helped introduce a generation of Americans cooks to real French cooking, died Monday at age 73. The author of "Simple French Cooking" and "The French Menu Cookbook," as well as many others, was a prime force in educating the cooks who launched the Bay Area foodie revolution in the 1960s, the revolution that helped create California cuisine. Olney, a frustrated artist, moved to France in 1951.
FOOD
February 2, 1995 | LAURIE OCHOA
Where would you take two of France's most respected cooks to lunch in your hometown? Certainly not a French restaurant. What could they say, but, "Gee, it's almost as good as what you get in France." Italian food poses almost the same problem--like taking a San Diegan out for Mexican food on a trip to Australia. Steak? Maybe. But wouldn't that be feeding the old meat-and-potato stereotype that so many of our friends abroad believe about American cooking?
FOOD
February 2, 1995 | LAURIE OCHOA, TIMES FOOD EDITOR
"A dreary old cliche has it that 'one should eat to live and not live to eat.' It is typical that this imbecile concept, a deliberately fruitless paradox born of the puritan mind, should deny sensuous reaction at either pole, and it is fortunate that neither pole really exists, for man is incapable of being either altogether dumbly bestial or altogether dumbly mental.'
FOOD
September 22, 2011
Lulu's tapenade Total time: 15 minutes Servings: 6 to 8 Note: This recipe is adapted from "Lulu's Provencal Table" by Richard Olney. 1/2 pound large Greek-style black olives, pitted 2 salted anchovies, rinsed and filleted, or 4 fillets 3 tablespoons capers 1 garlic clove, peeled and pounded to a paste with a pinch of coarse salt Small pinch of cayenne 1 teaspoon tender young savory leaves, finely chopped, or a pinch...
FOOD
May 6, 1993
Larry Forgione of New York's An American Place and Jean-Louis Palladin of Washington's Jean-Louis at the Watergate shared top honors at the third James Beard Awards presentation Monday night. Forgione and Palladin finished in a dead heat for chef of the year. Restaurant of the year was Inn at Little Washington, in Washington, Va.
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