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Richard P Feynman

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April 9, 1989
When Richard P. Feynman, the late, world-renowned physicist with a passion for puzzle-solving and for making mischief, received the call at 4 in the morning telling him that he had won the 1965 Nobel Prize for physics, his reaction was to say, "Yeah, but I'm sleeping !" By the fifth or sixth call he told the reporter from Time magazine, "I don't know how to get out of this thing. Maybe I won't accept the prize." But the combustible curmudgeon eventually relented. In "Surely You're Joking," Feynman tells stories of his childhood in Far Rockaway, of his studies at MIT and Princeton, of his experience on the Manhattan Project in Los Alamos, of his work as professor at Cornell and Caltech and of his research in theoretical physics.
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BOOKS
May 22, 2005 | George Johnson, George Johnson's seventh book, "Miss Leavitt's Stars: The Untold Story of the Woman Who Discovered How to Measure the Universe," will be published in June.
A lot of money has been made from the literary estate of Richard P. Feynman, the Caltech physicist, Nobel laureate and performance artist, who stumbled into bestsellerdom in 1985 with a collection of anecdotes, transcribed from tape recordings, called "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!" Three years later came a posthumous sequel, "What Do You Care What Other People Think?"
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MAGAZINE
May 21, 1989 | JACK SMITH
HERE HAS been much speculation on the meaning of life. Why are we here? Mostly the answers are those of theologians, philosophers, physicists and others who are thought to have some special pipeline to the eternal mysteries. But all of us wonder why we are here. It is a question that occurs to little boys and girls playing with their toys; to college students; to plumbers, teachers, U.S. senators, nurses, soldiers, the homeless, ship captains and chief executive officers. Their answers are rarely found in Bartlett's or any other compilation of quotations; yet the wisest men admit that the answer is beyond philosophy and science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2001 | K.C. COLE
Alan Alda is a lot like Lucretius. To be fair, Alda, who is currently playing the late physicist Richard Feynman at the Mark Taper Forum, is a lot younger than the ancient Roman sage. Lucretius lived more than 2,000 years ago, and wrote a famous poem that proffers everything from advice for the lovesick to a theory of the universe. His work, "On the Nature of Things," translated mostly obscure Greek thought for a popular Latin audience. Today, we might call him a popularizer of science.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1989 | ZAN DUBIN
The story of how "Nomads" came to Los Angeles is linked to an intriguing tale about an insatiably curious world-famous physicist, his fellow bongo drum player and their 12-year quest to travel to a remote Shangri-La. Nobel laureate Richard P. Feynman, widely viewed as the world's leading theoretical physicist of his day before he died of cancer at 69 a year ago this month, was also known as an eccentric, fun-loving adventurer.
NEWS
June 11, 1986 | PETER H. KING, Times Staff Writer
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration leadership persistently exaggerated the reliability of the space shuttle "to the point of fantasy" and by deceiving Congress and the nation--and perhaps even itself--placed the program on a path to catastrophe, a member of the presidential commission on the Challenger explosion said Tuesday. One day after delivery of the full commission report to President Reagan, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard P.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1994 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Physicist Richard P. Feynman was just 24 when the U.S. government recruited him to help invent the atomic bomb. A graduate of Princeton, where he received his doctorate in 1942, Feynman was already a star in the science community, which was dazzled by his intuitive grasp of the complex outer reaches of physics. Skilled at feats of mental arithmetic that left his colleagues scratching their heads, Feynman seemed to do physics by ear.
BOOKS
October 20, 1985
RICHARD P. FEYNMAN, Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! (Norton: $16.95). Overwhelmed by a flurry of job offers after working on the atom bomb during World War II--including a position at the Institute for Advanced Study ("Better than Einstein, even! It was ideal; it was perfect; it was absurd!")--Richard Feynman began to worry about whether he could live up to his colleagues' expectations: So I got this new attitude.
NEWS
April 22, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bowers Museum director Peter Keller may have his museum booked until 1995, having traveled to China and other far climes to oversee every detail of his scheduled exhibits, but I'll bet he doesn't know he's going to have a yurt full of Tuvans on his lawn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2001 | K.C. COLE
Alan Alda is a lot like Lucretius. To be fair, Alda, who is currently playing the late physicist Richard Feynman at the Mark Taper Forum, is a lot younger than the ancient Roman sage. Lucretius lived more than 2,000 years ago, and wrote a famous poem that proffers everything from advice for the lovesick to a theory of the universe. His work, "On the Nature of Things," translated mostly obscure Greek thought for a popular Latin audience. Today, we might call him a popularizer of science.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1994 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Physicist Richard P. Feynman was just 24 when the U.S. government recruited him to help invent the atomic bomb. A graduate of Princeton, where he received his doctorate in 1942, Feynman was already a star in the science community, which was dazzled by his intuitive grasp of the complex outer reaches of physics. Skilled at feats of mental arithmetic that left his colleagues scratching their heads, Feynman seemed to do physics by ear.
NEWS
April 22, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bowers Museum director Peter Keller may have his museum booked until 1995, having traveled to China and other far climes to oversee every detail of his scheduled exhibits, but I'll bet he doesn't know he's going to have a yurt full of Tuvans on his lawn.
MAGAZINE
May 21, 1989 | JACK SMITH
HERE HAS been much speculation on the meaning of life. Why are we here? Mostly the answers are those of theologians, philosophers, physicists and others who are thought to have some special pipeline to the eternal mysteries. But all of us wonder why we are here. It is a question that occurs to little boys and girls playing with their toys; to college students; to plumbers, teachers, U.S. senators, nurses, soldiers, the homeless, ship captains and chief executive officers. Their answers are rarely found in Bartlett's or any other compilation of quotations; yet the wisest men admit that the answer is beyond philosophy and science.
BOOKS
April 9, 1989
When Richard P. Feynman, the late, world-renowned physicist with a passion for puzzle-solving and for making mischief, received the call at 4 in the morning telling him that he had won the 1965 Nobel Prize for physics, his reaction was to say, "Yeah, but I'm sleeping !" By the fifth or sixth call he told the reporter from Time magazine, "I don't know how to get out of this thing. Maybe I won't accept the prize." But the combustible curmudgeon eventually relented. In "Surely You're Joking," Feynman tells stories of his childhood in Far Rockaway, of his studies at MIT and Princeton, of his experience on the Manhattan Project in Los Alamos, of his work as professor at Cornell and Caltech and of his research in theoretical physics.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1989 | ZAN DUBIN
The story of how "Nomads" came to Los Angeles is linked to an intriguing tale about an insatiably curious world-famous physicist, his fellow bongo drum player and their 12-year quest to travel to a remote Shangri-La. Nobel laureate Richard P. Feynman, widely viewed as the world's leading theoretical physicist of his day before he died of cancer at 69 a year ago this month, was also known as an eccentric, fun-loving adventurer.
BOOKS
November 13, 1988 | Bettyann Kevles, Kevles writes about science for The Times
The announcement of Richard Feynman's death in February startled many of us who had known the Nobel Laureate at Caltech, even as we acknowledged that the cancer that killed him could not be fended off indefinitely. He called himself "a curious character." Certainly he achieved that status: self-created eccentric, would-be 20th-Century Leonardo, all-around genius with the added fillip of a sense of humor. He was a great physicist who looked on nature afresh each day.
BOOKS
May 22, 2005 | George Johnson, George Johnson's seventh book, "Miss Leavitt's Stars: The Untold Story of the Woman Who Discovered How to Measure the Universe," will be published in June.
A lot of money has been made from the literary estate of Richard P. Feynman, the Caltech physicist, Nobel laureate and performance artist, who stumbled into bestsellerdom in 1985 with a collection of anecdotes, transcribed from tape recordings, called "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!" Three years later came a posthumous sequel, "What Do You Care What Other People Think?"
MAGAZINE
April 20, 1986 | LAWRENCE GROBEL, Lawrence Grobel's book, "Conversations With Capote," has recently been published in paperback
One day last February, on a brightly lit stage in a large hall of the State Department in Washington, a distinguished panel of presidential appointees was conducting its investigation into the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger. The line of inquiry had turned to the effects that cold weather may have had on the launch.
NEWS
June 11, 1986 | PETER H. KING, Times Staff Writer
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration leadership persistently exaggerated the reliability of the space shuttle "to the point of fantasy" and by deceiving Congress and the nation--and perhaps even itself--placed the program on a path to catastrophe, a member of the presidential commission on the Challenger explosion said Tuesday. One day after delivery of the full commission report to President Reagan, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard P.
MAGAZINE
April 20, 1986 | LAWRENCE GROBEL, Lawrence Grobel's book, "Conversations With Capote," has recently been published in paperback
One day last February, on a brightly lit stage in a large hall of the State Department in Washington, a distinguished panel of presidential appointees was conducting its investigation into the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger. The line of inquiry had turned to the effects that cold weather may have had on the launch.
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