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Richard P Sybert

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REAL ESTATE
September 3, 1989
Sam Hall Kaplan misses the mark in "Save City West Plan From Deal Makers" (Aug. 20) when he says that the "first and highest obligation should be to the residents who now live there" and their alleged need for housing and schools. The highest and best use of this area is for development of the downtown Los Angeles business district, which serves the needs of all 15 million Southern California residents, not a handful of what are probably largely illegal aliens who could live in any of a number of other places.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1994
One of the more distressing aspects of running for public office is the staged press attacks, of which Toni Casala's letter (April 18) is a good example. Ms. Casala purports to be "outraged" at the series of public meetings I have held as a member of the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy. She should have taken the time to learn the facts first: I am statutorily the public member of the conservancy from the San Fernando Valley, and I have a legal duty to discharge that representation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1991
The lead story in March 17's Ventura County edition concerned intervention by Gov. Pete Wilson and U. S. Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan Jr. on behalf of the Jordan Ranch land deal. To their credit, the Ventura County supervisors are taking the stand that this is a local decision to be made only after very serious consideration of all aspects of the problem. Much of my personal feelings on the subject were triggered by remarks of Richard P. Sybert, identified as director of Gov. Wilson's Office of Planning and Research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1993
I am writing in response to a letter to the editor written by Richard P. Sybert, published on Sept. 8, regarding your Aug. 29 article on immigration reform ("Beilenson, Gallegly Ideas in U.S. Spotlight"). I feel that Sybert is being ingenuous with an issue that is too important to this country to be trivialized with partisan politics. My company, Security Imaging Corp., has developed a unique photoengraving technology that we have been demonstrating to members of Congress over the past several months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1993
Your article on immigration reform ("Beilenson, Gallegly Ideas in U.S. Spotlight," Aug. 29) was a little overgenerous in giving equal billing to Congressmen Elton Gallegly and Anthony Beilenson. In fact, Gallegly has been the point man in the platoon, while Beilenson has been largely missing in action--all talk and mostly no show. Beilenson seems not to have discovered the immigration issues, at least not with any real fervor, until just last year--when he moved into a new conservative district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1986
Democratic National Chairman Paul Kirk and Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.) were not the only ones smiling after the election results. You can add the Soviet Union's Mikhail Gorbachev and Nicaragua's Daniel Ortega to that list. Irrespective of domestic politics, the big winner on election night was the Soviet Union. The new Senate will now be far more disposed to interfere in the conduct of foreign affairs, to block Reagan Administration policies in Central America, and to press for superficially attractive but damaging agreements on strategic arms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1993
I am writing in response to a letter to the editor written by Richard P. Sybert, published on Sept. 8, regarding your Aug. 29 article on immigration reform ("Beilenson, Gallegly Ideas in U.S. Spotlight"). I feel that Sybert is being ingenuous with an issue that is too important to this country to be trivialized with partisan politics. My company, Security Imaging Corp., has developed a unique photoengraving technology that we have been demonstrating to members of Congress over the past several months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1994
One of the more distressing aspects of running for public office is the staged press attacks, of which Toni Casala's letter (April 18) is a good example. Ms. Casala purports to be "outraged" at the series of public meetings I have held as a member of the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy. She should have taken the time to learn the facts first: I am statutorily the public member of the conservancy from the San Fernando Valley, and I have a legal duty to discharge that representation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1985
William Schneider's essay in Opinion on reapportionment is refreshing in its candid admission that the Democrats have gerrymandered California to death. He is quite wrong, however, in his conclusion that the cure (court intervention) would be worse than the disease. It is not necessary for the courts to involve themselves affirmatively in the reapportionment process in order to be able to recognize a clear abuse. In California, for example, the evidence is overwhelming and uncontested that the state's Democrats set out deliberately to disenfranchise Republican votes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1986
Richard P. Sybert (Letters, Nov. 12) states that the Democrats' new majority in the Senate is a victory for the Soviet Union and Nicaragua's Daniel Ortega. According to Sybert, the Senate will now serve only to "interfere" in foreign affairs. Some Democrats may act with restraint, he argues, but, "no such hope can be held out in the case of Alan Cranston." Perhaps Sybert does not believe in the constitutional guarantee of a system of checks and balances. Undoubtedly, he would prefer to let President Reagan institute all foreign policy through uncontested executive orders, without the "interference" of the Congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1993
Your article on immigration reform ("Beilenson, Gallegly Ideas in U.S. Spotlight," Aug. 29) was a little overgenerous in giving equal billing to Congressmen Elton Gallegly and Anthony Beilenson. In fact, Gallegly has been the point man in the platoon, while Beilenson has been largely missing in action--all talk and mostly no show. Beilenson seems not to have discovered the immigration issues, at least not with any real fervor, until just last year--when he moved into a new conservative district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1991
The lead story in March 17's Ventura County edition concerned intervention by Gov. Pete Wilson and U. S. Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan Jr. on behalf of the Jordan Ranch land deal. To their credit, the Ventura County supervisors are taking the stand that this is a local decision to be made only after very serious consideration of all aspects of the problem. Much of my personal feelings on the subject were triggered by remarks of Richard P. Sybert, identified as director of Gov. Wilson's Office of Planning and Research.
REAL ESTATE
September 3, 1989
Sam Hall Kaplan misses the mark in "Save City West Plan From Deal Makers" (Aug. 20) when he says that the "first and highest obligation should be to the residents who now live there" and their alleged need for housing and schools. The highest and best use of this area is for development of the downtown Los Angeles business district, which serves the needs of all 15 million Southern California residents, not a handful of what are probably largely illegal aliens who could live in any of a number of other places.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1986
Richard P. Sybert (Letters, Nov. 12) states that the Democrats' new majority in the Senate is a victory for the Soviet Union and Nicaragua's Daniel Ortega. According to Sybert, the Senate will now serve only to "interfere" in foreign affairs. Some Democrats may act with restraint, he argues, but, "no such hope can be held out in the case of Alan Cranston." Perhaps Sybert does not believe in the constitutional guarantee of a system of checks and balances. Undoubtedly, he would prefer to let President Reagan institute all foreign policy through uncontested executive orders, without the "interference" of the Congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1986
Democratic National Chairman Paul Kirk and Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.) were not the only ones smiling after the election results. You can add the Soviet Union's Mikhail Gorbachev and Nicaragua's Daniel Ortega to that list. Irrespective of domestic politics, the big winner on election night was the Soviet Union. The new Senate will now be far more disposed to interfere in the conduct of foreign affairs, to block Reagan Administration policies in Central America, and to press for superficially attractive but damaging agreements on strategic arms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1985
William Schneider's essay in Opinion on reapportionment is refreshing in its candid admission that the Democrats have gerrymandered California to death. He is quite wrong, however, in his conclusion that the cure (court intervention) would be worse than the disease. It is not necessary for the courts to involve themselves affirmatively in the reapportionment process in order to be able to recognize a clear abuse. In California, for example, the evidence is overwhelming and uncontested that the state's Democrats set out deliberately to disenfranchise Republican votes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1985
Richard P. Sybert's letter (Jan. 17), "Reagan's Foreign Policy Record," provides a clear example of the simplistic view of the world held by far too many Americans today. In his defense of the Reagan Administration's foreign policy, Sybert describes a world in which every conflict is a reflection of the U.S.-Soviet conflict, and matters are decided primarily by the actions of these superpowers. He gives credit to the Reagan Administration for the "re-emergence" of democracy in Argentina and Brazil when, in fact, the United States had little to do with this.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1989
If Brown wants to come back, fine and good. He will give the Republicans a target against whom to run for many years. RICHARD P. SYBERT Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1985
Richard P. Sybert's letter (Jan. 17), "Reagan's Foreign Policy Record," provides a clear example of the simplistic view of the world held by far too many Americans today. In his defense of the Reagan Administration's foreign policy, Sybert describes a world in which every conflict is a reflection of the U.S.-Soviet conflict, and matters are decided primarily by the actions of these superpowers. He gives credit to the Reagan Administration for the "re-emergence" of democracy in Argentina and Brazil when, in fact, the United States had little to do with this.
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