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Richard Penniman

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NEWS
February 5, 1987
Little Richard has sought a court ruling to determine whether he is the author of the theme song from the movie, "Down and Out in Beverly Hills," which he claims he performed and co-wrote with singer Billy Preston.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER NOXON, Christopher Noxon is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer
Little Richard--wearing flashy clothes, a foot-high pompadour and punctuating his lyrics with what would become his signature "Wooh!"--is working a crowd of young fans into an utter frenzy during a 1956 concert in the segregated South. The scene, re-created in an NBC movie starring Leon as the legendary singer, picks up as he screams, stomps and rips through his set, pausing only to wipe the sweat from his face with a pair of silky panties thrown at his feet.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1985 | Kathy Seal \f7
Michael Jackson is hoping to exec produce a film on the zany life story of rocker-turned-preacher Little Richard (Richard Penniman), said a source close to Jackson. If an agreement can be worked out, the film would utilize the Little Richard songs acquired in Jackson's recent purchase of ATV Music (see next item).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine a time when sex was taboo for discussion, let alone depiction, in mainstream culture, and you get a sense of the charge Little Richard's great '50s recordings planted in audiences. Listeners knew that Long Tall Sally was built for more than speed and that, in "Tutti-Frutti," the gal named Sue who knew just what to do knew it in the biblical sense. At 65, Little Richard is too smart to believe he can slam back to the era when he put out a call to orgiastic arms.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Songwriter Billy Preston and two others filed a suit Tuesday in Los Angeles charging that Little Richard took credit for a song he sang in the 1986 hit, "Down and Out in Beverly Hills" that actually belongs to them. Preston, Sylvia Smith and John Schuller said they wrote "Just a Matter of Time" in March, 1985, and that Preston recorded an audio tape while Little Richard, a. k. a Richard Penniman, listened, says a copyright infringement suit filed in U.S. District Court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1985 | CATALINA CAMIA, Times Staff Writer
Little Richard, a flamboyant singer in the early days of rock 'n' roll, was listed in fair condition Tuesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center after his sports car crashed into a telephone pole in West Hollywood, a hospital spokesman said. The 52-year-old singer, whose real name is Richard Penniman, suffered a broken right leg, bruised ribs and head and facial injuries in the 12:05 a.m. accident, Ron Wise reported. "He is awake, conscious and alert," Wise said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine a time when sex was taboo for discussion, let alone depiction, in mainstream culture, and you get a sense of the charge Little Richard's great '50s recordings planted in audiences. Listeners knew that Long Tall Sally was built for more than speed and that, in "Tutti-Frutti," the gal named Sue who knew just what to do knew it in the biblical sense. At 65, Little Richard is too smart to believe he can slam back to the era when he put out a call to orgiastic arms.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1987 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
Little Richard's first completely secular rock 'n' roll record in more than a decade is scheduled for release later this month, and he had this advise: You might have to fight any 5-year-olds in the house for possession of it. His latest comeback effort is "Gawrsh Golly Goofy," a rollicking tune in the pumping piano, yelping tradition of his landmark '50s hits "Tutti Frutti" and "Long Tall Sally."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER NOXON, Christopher Noxon is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer
Little Richard--wearing flashy clothes, a foot-high pompadour and punctuating his lyrics with what would become his signature "Wooh!"--is working a crowd of young fans into an utter frenzy during a 1956 concert in the segregated South. The scene, re-created in an NBC movie starring Leon as the legendary singer, picks up as he screams, stomps and rips through his set, pausing only to wipe the sweat from his face with a pair of silky panties thrown at his feet.
NEWS
June 16, 1994 | JIM WASHBURN, Jim Washburn is a free-lance writer who contributes regularly to The Times Orange County Edition.
There are celebrities, and then there are celebrities , the ones whose personas are writ so large, so distinctive and so fully in-character at all times that you have to wonder, "Do they ever let it drop and act like the rest of us?" Did Jimmy Durante continue to declare "I got a million of 'em!" when he was among friends? Did Mae West drop the sultry act when she was talking to her mom? Does Barney the Dinosaur hunker down with a copy of "Busty Brontos" when no one's looking?
NEWS
June 16, 1994 | JIM WASHBURN, Jim Washburn is a free-lance writer who contributes regularly to The Times Orange County Edition.
There are celebrities, and then there are celebrities , the ones whose personas are writ so large, so distinctive and so fully in-character at all times that you have to wonder, "Do they ever let it drop and act like the rest of us?" Did Jimmy Durante continue to declare "I got a million of 'em!" when he was among friends? Did Mae West drop the sultry act when she was talking to her mom? Does Barney the Dinosaur hunker down with a copy of "Busty Brontos" when no one's looking?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1987 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
Little Richard's first completely secular rock 'n' roll record in more than a decade is scheduled for release later this month, and he had this advise: You might have to fight any 5-year-olds in the house for possession of it. His latest comeback effort is "Gawrsh Golly Goofy," a rollicking tune in the pumping piano, yelping tradition of his landmark '50s hits "Tutti Frutti" and "Long Tall Sally."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Songwriter Billy Preston and two others filed a suit Tuesday in Los Angeles charging that Little Richard took credit for a song he sang in the 1986 hit, "Down and Out in Beverly Hills" that actually belongs to them. Preston, Sylvia Smith and John Schuller said they wrote "Just a Matter of Time" in March, 1985, and that Preston recorded an audio tape while Little Richard, a. k. a Richard Penniman, listened, says a copyright infringement suit filed in U.S. District Court.
NEWS
February 5, 1987
Little Richard has sought a court ruling to determine whether he is the author of the theme song from the movie, "Down and Out in Beverly Hills," which he claims he performed and co-wrote with singer Billy Preston.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1985 | CATALINA CAMIA, Times Staff Writer
Little Richard, a flamboyant singer in the early days of rock 'n' roll, was listed in fair condition Tuesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center after his sports car crashed into a telephone pole in West Hollywood, a hospital spokesman said. The 52-year-old singer, whose real name is Richard Penniman, suffered a broken right leg, bruised ribs and head and facial injuries in the 12:05 a.m. accident, Ron Wise reported. "He is awake, conscious and alert," Wise said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1985 | Kathy Seal \f7
Michael Jackson is hoping to exec produce a film on the zany life story of rocker-turned-preacher Little Richard (Richard Penniman), said a source close to Jackson. If an agreement can be worked out, the film would utilize the Little Richard songs acquired in Jackson's recent purchase of ATV Music (see next item).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Good golly Miss Molly! Little Richard is going to be on the road for a long time! The Macon City Council voted Tuesday to name a road after its local hero. The Little Richard Penniman Boulevard beat other suggestions to honor the flamboyant rocker, such as "Tutti Frutti," one of the singer's biggest hits. Little Richard Penniman Boulevard had been known as simply the "downtown connector."
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