Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRichard Posner
IN THE NEWS

Richard Posner

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 25, 1992
Judge Refuses to Step Down in TV Rerun Case: A federal appeals judge refused to step down in the ongoing fight over the issue of allowing the networks to sell TV program reruns. Last week the Hollywood studios were joined by the Federal Communications Commission in requesting that U.S. District Judge Richard Posner recuse himself from the proceeding because of consulting work he did for CBS on a similar issue in 1977.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Jim Newton, Los Angeles Times
At his confirmation hearings for the position of chief justice of the United States, John G. Roberts Jr. parried skeptics with a reassuring metaphor: "Judges are like umpires," he memorably testified. "Umpires don't make the rules, they apply them. The role of an umpire and a judge is critical to make sure everybody plays by the rules. But it is a limited role. " Senators were charmed by that modesty and impressed by Roberts' undeniable brilliance, but his chief justiceship has hardly been a model of restraint.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Jim Newton, Los Angeles Times
At his confirmation hearings for the position of chief justice of the United States, John G. Roberts Jr. parried skeptics with a reassuring metaphor: "Judges are like umpires," he memorably testified. "Umpires don't make the rules, they apply them. The role of an umpire and a judge is critical to make sure everybody plays by the rules. But it is a limited role. " Senators were charmed by that modesty and impressed by Roberts' undeniable brilliance, but his chief justiceship has hardly been a model of restraint.
BOOKS
January 28, 2007 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch is an attorney specializing in publishing law and the author of, most recently, "A History of the End of the World: How the Most Controversial Book in the Bible Changed the Course of Western Civilization."
AT 116 pages -- and small pages at that -- Richard A. Posner's "The Little Book of Plagiarism" is aptly titled. It's a brief but provocative and illuminating meditation on the current craze for searching out, denouncing and punishing authors who appear to have borrowed the work of others and passed it off as their own.
BOOKS
January 28, 2007 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch is an attorney specializing in publishing law and the author of, most recently, "A History of the End of the World: How the Most Controversial Book in the Bible Changed the Course of Western Civilization."
AT 116 pages -- and small pages at that -- Richard A. Posner's "The Little Book of Plagiarism" is aptly titled. It's a brief but provocative and illuminating meditation on the current craze for searching out, denouncing and punishing authors who appear to have borrowed the work of others and passed it off as their own.
BOOKS
January 27, 2002 | RUSSELL JACOBY
Did you know that if I were writing this review for big bucks, it would be better--at least according to Richard Posner? Posner adores the free market; his only regret is that salaried teachers like myself escape its beneficial imperatives. Posner is a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals; he is a well-regarded professor at the University of Chicago Law School and an author who writes with astounding energy on an astounding number of topics.
BOOKS
May 25, 2003 | Alexander Keyssar, Alexander Keyssar is Stirling professor of history and social policy at Harvard and the author of "The Right to Vote: The Contested History of Democracy in the United States."
History has moved forward in a rush since the disputed election of November 2000, leaving our memories of that peculiar event overshadowed by images of terrorism and war. Indeed, the significance of the election for domestic politics (in contrast to foreign affairs) now seems diminished to a level inconceivable two years ago. The legitimacy of George W.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1999
* Federal appeals court Judge Richard Posner met with representatives of Microsoft Corp., 19 states and the Justice Department for nearly two hours in Chicago to explore the chances of a settlement in the company's landmark antitrust trial. None of the parties to the meeting made a formal statement, but one attorney said they were under orders to not discuss the talks publicly.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1991
USC's School of Fine Arts will kick off its new master's degree in Public Art Studies by offering three experimental courses in the subject this fall. "History of Art in Public Places" will be taught by Elizabeth Smith, curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art; "Survey for Cultural Planners" will be taught by Jessica Cusick, director of Metro Rail and other art programs for the L.A.
OPINION
February 3, 2008 | Philip L. Fradkin, Philip L. Fradkin is the author of 11 books about the American West and Alaska, including "Wallace Stegner and the American West," to be published this month.
Plagiarism is apparently so rife these days that it would not be surprising to discover that "The Little Book of Plagiarism," by Richard A. Posner, has itself been plagiarized. What is this modern-day phenomenon that has spread like poison ivy through the ranks of novelists, historians, academics, scientists, students and almost anyone who uses and publishes words?
BOOKS
May 25, 2003 | Alexander Keyssar, Alexander Keyssar is Stirling professor of history and social policy at Harvard and the author of "The Right to Vote: The Contested History of Democracy in the United States."
History has moved forward in a rush since the disputed election of November 2000, leaving our memories of that peculiar event overshadowed by images of terrorism and war. Indeed, the significance of the election for domestic politics (in contrast to foreign affairs) now seems diminished to a level inconceivable two years ago. The legitimacy of George W.
BOOKS
January 27, 2002 | RUSSELL JACOBY
Did you know that if I were writing this review for big bucks, it would be better--at least according to Richard Posner? Posner adores the free market; his only regret is that salaried teachers like myself escape its beneficial imperatives. Posner is a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals; he is a well-regarded professor at the University of Chicago Law School and an author who writes with astounding energy on an astounding number of topics.
BUSINESS
November 25, 1992
Judge Refuses to Step Down in TV Rerun Case: A federal appeals judge refused to step down in the ongoing fight over the issue of allowing the networks to sell TV program reruns. Last week the Hollywood studios were joined by the Federal Communications Commission in requesting that U.S. District Judge Richard Posner recuse himself from the proceeding because of consulting work he did for CBS on a similar issue in 1977.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
A federal appeals judge cleared the way for a $352-million settlement in a price-fixing case involving 11 major pharmaceutical firms to take effect Sept. 2. Eighth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Chief Judge Richard Posner dismissed the remaining appeals of some plaintiffs of the class-action settlement, which requires several of the drug makers, including Merck & Co. and Pfizer Inc., to stop pricing goods differently for different buyers.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|