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Richard Preston

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NEWS
October 18, 1994 | D.T. MAX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Preston has a knack for getting into wherever he wants and coaxing information from whomever he wants. "I don't believe that I'm a gifted writer, but I believe I am a gifted listener," says the 40-year-old author, who is in fact both. "When I talk to someone, I just keep hearing their sentences over and over in my head even when I'm asleep. And when you get fascinated by something, people open up."
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NATIONAL
September 27, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton
A Maryland-based Ku Klux Klan group plans on holding an event in Gettysburg National Military Park, site of the three-day Civil War battle, park officials said. The Confederate White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, a white supremacy group, will stage a three-hour event on Oct. 5, on the battlefield's grounds, just a stone's throw from the national cemetery. President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address - regarded as one of most famous speeches in U.S. history - was delivered at the dedication of the national cemetery.
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BOOKS
May 19, 1991 | Frank Rose, Rose is the author of "West of Eden" (Viking), about the struggle for control of Apple Computer
In the catalogue of human industry, steelmaking must rank as the most strangely compelling entry of all. Pyromania pales beside the lure of "hot metal"--molten steel, with its blackbody glow and its hint of imminent catastrophe. To melt down great chunks of the earth in order to make implements of superhuman strength is to engage in hubris on a grand scale. Little wonder steel men consider themselves special.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2011
Micro A Novel Michael Crichton and Richard Preston Harper: 448 pp., $28.99
BOOKS
September 25, 1994 | Bob Sipchen, Bob Sipchen, a Times Staff Writer and the author of "Baby Insane and the Buddha" (Bantam, 1994), is currently working on a novel about surfing, firefighting, conceptual art and mental illness
"The Hot Zone" got out of my backpack while I was off fishing. There were other choices in our motley array of tents--Cormac McCarthy novels, Paul Bowles stories, "The Magic Mountain" and Ralph Cutter's "Sierra Trout Guide." But it was my nondescript advance proof of "The Hot Zone" that inflamed Jim's interest, and for the rest of our five-day trip the book and its story spread.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2011
Micro A Novel Michael Crichton and Richard Preston Harper: 448 pp., $28.99
NATIONAL
September 27, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton
A Maryland-based Ku Klux Klan group plans on holding an event in Gettysburg National Military Park, site of the three-day Civil War battle, park officials said. The Confederate White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, a white supremacy group, will stage a three-hour event on Oct. 5, on the battlefield's grounds, just a stone's throw from the national cemetery. President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address - regarded as one of most famous speeches in U.S. history - was delivered at the dedication of the national cemetery.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1993
I am writing in response to Robert W. Welkos' article "A New Yorker Writer Unleashes the Most Virulent Strain of All: Movie Producers" (Film Clips, Feb. 28) The article implies that my writing partner, Laurence Dworet, and I are ripping off Richard Preston's article in our "Virus" project for Arnold Kopelson and Warners. Nothing could be further from the truth. Preston is a little naive if he thinks that by writing one article in the New Yorker he somehow owns an entire subject.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2011 | By Jeff VanderMeer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
What if we had the technology to miniaturize people and objects? That's the central premise behind "Micro" by "Jurassic Park's" Michael Crichton and "The Hot Zone's" Richard Preston. Crichton wrote one-third of "Micro" before his death in 2008 - which third seems largely irrelevant, as the entire novel functions as a well-oiled but oddly soulless machine. All of the edges have been sanded off of prose that is supremely functional and most of the workmanlike characters seem resigned to being transformed into actors on a movie screen.
BOOKS
January 15, 1989 | ELENA BRUNET
Winner of a Science Writing Award from the American Institute of Physics, "First Light" is a captivating, almost awe-inspiring story about a team of astronomers operating at the Hale Telescope, at Palomar Observatory, Caltech. Preston describes the work and lives of astronomers Maarten Schmidt, Jim Gunn and Don Schneider, as well as engineers and programmers on the team.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2011 | By Jeff VanderMeer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
What if we had the technology to miniaturize people and objects? That's the central premise behind "Micro" by "Jurassic Park's" Michael Crichton and "The Hot Zone's" Richard Preston. Crichton wrote one-third of "Micro" before his death in 2008 - which third seems largely irrelevant, as the entire novel functions as a well-oiled but oddly soulless machine. All of the edges have been sanded off of prose that is supremely functional and most of the workmanlike characters seem resigned to being transformed into actors on a movie screen.
BOOKS
April 8, 2007 | Thomas Curwen, thomas.curwen@latimes.com Thomas Curwen is an editor at large for The Times.
HUGGING a coast redwood -- Sequoia sempervirens, the tallest species of tree on Earth -- is harder than it seems. Oh, sure, you can attempt a ground-floor embrace, but considering the sheer majesty of these creatures, that's a mere peck on the prom queen's cheek compared with the pleasures awaiting you aloft. But be warned: Foreplay is arduous.
NEWS
October 18, 1994 | D.T. MAX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Preston has a knack for getting into wherever he wants and coaxing information from whomever he wants. "I don't believe that I'm a gifted writer, but I believe I am a gifted listener," says the 40-year-old author, who is in fact both. "When I talk to someone, I just keep hearing their sentences over and over in my head even when I'm asleep. And when you get fascinated by something, people open up."
BOOKS
September 25, 1994 | Bob Sipchen, Bob Sipchen, a Times Staff Writer and the author of "Baby Insane and the Buddha" (Bantam, 1994), is currently working on a novel about surfing, firefighting, conceptual art and mental illness
"The Hot Zone" got out of my backpack while I was off fishing. There were other choices in our motley array of tents--Cormac McCarthy novels, Paul Bowles stories, "The Magic Mountain" and Ralph Cutter's "Sierra Trout Guide." But it was my nondescript advance proof of "The Hot Zone" that inflamed Jim's interest, and for the rest of our five-day trip the book and its story spread.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1993
I am writing in response to Robert W. Welkos' article "A New Yorker Writer Unleashes the Most Virulent Strain of All: Movie Producers" (Film Clips, Feb. 28) The article implies that my writing partner, Laurence Dworet, and I are ripping off Richard Preston's article in our "Virus" project for Arnold Kopelson and Warners. Nothing could be further from the truth. Preston is a little naive if he thinks that by writing one article in the New Yorker he somehow owns an entire subject.
BOOKS
May 19, 1991 | Frank Rose, Rose is the author of "West of Eden" (Viking), about the struggle for control of Apple Computer
In the catalogue of human industry, steelmaking must rank as the most strangely compelling entry of all. Pyromania pales beside the lure of "hot metal"--molten steel, with its blackbody glow and its hint of imminent catastrophe. To melt down great chunks of the earth in order to make implements of superhuman strength is to engage in hubris on a grand scale. Little wonder steel men consider themselves special.
BOOKS
April 8, 2007 | Thomas Curwen, thomas.curwen@latimes.com Thomas Curwen is an editor at large for The Times.
HUGGING a coast redwood -- Sequoia sempervirens, the tallest species of tree on Earth -- is harder than it seems. Oh, sure, you can attempt a ground-floor embrace, but considering the sheer majesty of these creatures, that's a mere peck on the prom queen's cheek compared with the pleasures awaiting you aloft. But be warned: Foreplay is arduous.
MAGAZINE
May 9, 1993
Jonathan Gold's "Speaking the Language" (Three on the Town, April 11) reminds me of my teen-age years when my friends and I thought we were being so clever by talking "jive" in front of adults and telling completely pointless jokes at which we roared with laughter. By the time we were 16, however, most of us quit thinking that such behavior was cute or novel or that our talk was flabbergasting the older generation. Apparently not so Mr. Gold. "Into his 30s" he still chortles at what "the '60s guy" must be thinking about his "dude talk" and enjoys believing that "it drives people nuts."
BOOKS
January 15, 1989 | ELENA BRUNET
Winner of a Science Writing Award from the American Institute of Physics, "First Light" is a captivating, almost awe-inspiring story about a team of astronomers operating at the Hale Telescope, at Palomar Observatory, Caltech. Preston describes the work and lives of astronomers Maarten Schmidt, Jim Gunn and Don Schneider, as well as engineers and programmers on the team.
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