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Richard Price

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BUSINESS
November 30, 1985
Richard Price, a co-founder of "the gymnasium of the mind" known as Esalen, has died after a fall while hiking in Hot Springs Canyon near the Big Sur institute. He was 55. In 1962, Price and former Stanford classmate Michael Murphy founded the institute "to explore human potentialities and personal and social development," Murphy said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BOOKS
March 2, 2008 | David L. Ulin, David L. Ulin is book editor of The Times.
IN the early 1990s, Richard Price made a decision to change direction in his work. Until then, he'd been an atmospheric urban novelist, the author of, among other titles, "The Wanderers," a Bronx-based coming-of-age novel set in the early 1960s, and "Ladies' Man," about a week in the life of a door-to-door salesman who's looking for love. These are self-contained books, small and character-driven, reminiscent in places of the gritty realism of Hubert Selby Jr.'s "Last Exit to Brooklyn."
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BOOKS
June 14, 1992 | David Colker, Colker is a Times staff writer
I loved Richard Price's early novels, but if I were on a quiz show and called upon to relate their plots, I would leave with only a home version of the game. The plots hardly mattered in those deeply felt novels--"The Wanderers" (1974), "Bloodbrothers" (1976) and most especially "Ladies' Man" (1978). What lingered in the memory was dialogue so pulsing and rhythmic that a page could leave you breathless.
BOOKS
February 2, 2003 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
In his novels "Clockers" and "Freedomland," Richard Price displayed an exact and intimate knowledge of drug dealing and racial conflict in the generic urban wasteland he called Dempsy, N.J. He couldn't have gained that knowledge without spending time in the streets and housing projects and talking to a lot of poor people and criminals. Probably some were flattered by Price's attention and frustrated when he stopped talking to them.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1996 | JOHN ANDERSON, FOR THE TIMES
The ruggedly handsome, maverick airline mogul--certain that his kidnapped son will be killed--does the only thing possible: He turns the ransom into a bounty, assuring his son's captors that they'll never be paid--and never sleep, unless they return his son safely. That's the heroic view.
NEWS
June 15, 1992 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cops are pumped up and screaming and it's a million degrees outside, but when they fly through the door, the crackheads freeze. The last one in is a skinny guy who's not even wearing a bulletproof vest--novelist Richard Price. "I have my notebook out like a crucifix," says Price, demonstrating his faith in the almighty written word.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1991 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Universal Pictures has agreed to pay a whopping $1.9 million for the screen rights to author Richard Price's upcoming crime thriller, "Clockers," sources said Friday. The Price deal, which includes a $300,000 bonus for screenwriting credit, raised eyebrows in industry circles, because Universal is said to be implementing a rigid austerity program under Chairman Tom Pollock next week.
BOOKS
February 2, 2003 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
In his novels "Clockers" and "Freedomland," Richard Price displayed an exact and intimate knowledge of drug dealing and racial conflict in the generic urban wasteland he called Dempsy, N.J. He couldn't have gained that knowledge without spending time in the streets and housing projects and talking to a lot of poor people and criminals. Probably some were flattered by Price's attention and frustrated when he stopped talking to them.
BOOKS
March 2, 2008 | David L. Ulin, David L. Ulin is book editor of The Times.
IN the early 1990s, Richard Price made a decision to change direction in his work. Until then, he'd been an atmospheric urban novelist, the author of, among other titles, "The Wanderers," a Bronx-based coming-of-age novel set in the early 1960s, and "Ladies' Man," about a week in the life of a door-to-door salesman who's looking for love. These are self-contained books, small and character-driven, reminiscent in places of the gritty realism of Hubert Selby Jr.'s "Last Exit to Brooklyn."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1992
Two Navy employees were arrested this weekend in connection with a carjacking and attack on a San Diego cabdriver. Graham Davis, 25, a fireman at the Naval Training Center's service school, and Richard Price, 25, a ship serviceman, were being held at County Jail on suspicion of attempted murder, robbery and auto theft, a San Diego police spokesman said. Craig Smith, 45, a Yellow Cab driver, was beat on the head and cut on the face during the robbery that occurred Friday about 11 p.m.
BOOKS
May 31, 1998 | JONATHAN LEVI, Jonathan Levi is a contributing writer to Book Review
On Oct. 25, 1994, a white woman named Susan Smith walked into the 6 o'clock zeitgeist of the nation. That day, she told the Union, S.C., police force that an African American male forced her out of her car at gunpoint and drove off with her two young children in the back seat. Within hours, news hounds from around the country stuck their telephoto noses into the story, capturing every tearful plea from Smith and her former husband, David.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1996 | JOHN ANDERSON, FOR THE TIMES
The ruggedly handsome, maverick airline mogul--certain that his kidnapped son will be killed--does the only thing possible: He turns the ransom into a bounty, assuring his son's captors that they'll never be paid--and never sleep, unless they return his son safely. That's the heroic view.
NEWS
June 15, 1992 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cops are pumped up and screaming and it's a million degrees outside, but when they fly through the door, the crackheads freeze. The last one in is a skinny guy who's not even wearing a bulletproof vest--novelist Richard Price. "I have my notebook out like a crucifix," says Price, demonstrating his faith in the almighty written word.
BOOKS
June 14, 1992 | David Colker, Colker is a Times staff writer
I loved Richard Price's early novels, but if I were on a quiz show and called upon to relate their plots, I would leave with only a home version of the game. The plots hardly mattered in those deeply felt novels--"The Wanderers" (1974), "Bloodbrothers" (1976) and most especially "Ladies' Man" (1978). What lingered in the memory was dialogue so pulsing and rhythmic that a page could leave you breathless.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1991 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Universal Pictures has agreed to pay a whopping $1.9 million for the screen rights to author Richard Price's upcoming crime thriller, "Clockers," sources said Friday. The Price deal, which includes a $300,000 bonus for screenwriting credit, raised eyebrows in industry circles, because Universal is said to be implementing a rigid austerity program under Chairman Tom Pollock next week.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1985
Richard Price, a co-founder of "the gymnasium of the mind" known as Esalen, has died after a fall while hiking in Hot Springs Canyon near the Big Sur institute. He was 55. In 1962, Price and former Stanford classmate Michael Murphy founded the institute "to explore human potentialities and personal and social development," Murphy said.
BOOKS
May 31, 1998 | JONATHAN LEVI, Jonathan Levi is a contributing writer to Book Review
On Oct. 25, 1994, a white woman named Susan Smith walked into the 6 o'clock zeitgeist of the nation. That day, she told the Union, S.C., police force that an African American male forced her out of her car at gunpoint and drove off with her two young children in the back seat. Within hours, news hounds from around the country stuck their telephoto noses into the story, capturing every tearful plea from Smith and her former husband, David.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1995 | Daniel Howard Cerone, Daniel Howard Cerone is a Times staff writer
On a bitter-cold January day in San Francisco, hundreds of extras gather on a narrow Chinatown street colorfully decorated with streaming banners and floats for a Chinese New Year's parade. Director William Friedkin, who staged celebrated chase scenes for "The French Connection" and "To Live and Die in L.A.," has worked up another one for his latest movie, "Jade," leading to this densely populated street. "Please, we're about to shoot," an assistant director shouts into a bullhorn.
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