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Richard Pryor

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2010 | By Geoff Boucher >>>
When it was announced that Marlon Wayans and not Eddie Murphy would be portraying Richard Pryor in the long-discussed biopic of the comedy giant, the news was greeted with Internet jeering. Wayans wasn't surprised when he read the disparaging comments -- you can't hang your star on films like "White Chicks" and "Little Man" without consequences. "Look, I want to be able to make the stupidest movies ever, because they make people laugh and they make money," Wayans recently said with a smirk.
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OPINION
April 21, 2014 | By Michael Krikorian
Last week I sent a text message to a friend. A Hollywood business meeting I had high hopes for had been suddenly "postponed. " "Everybody canceled except me," I texted. She texted back, "Haha. " What's so funny about it, I wondered? Where's the haha in my disappointment? My text was more sad than funny; her text steamed me. Dismissed twice . "Haha" and its partner, "LOL," are texting's go-to replies, a vaguely complimentary, vaguely condescending way to acknowledge a text has been received.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Two men living decades apart have two key things in common: They lived in Los Angeles, and they were two of the funniest men ever. Harold Lloyd was one of the great silent clowns, and 1923's “Safety Last” was one of his classic roles, the source of one of the best-known images from the entire silent-film era: Lloyd dangling above the Los Angeles skyline, hanging from the hands of an enormous clock. The Criterion Collection provides a newly restored version of “Safety Last!” as well as numerous extras, including a documentary (“The Third Genius”)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Amy Kaufman
"How you doin', baby?" Marlon Wayans said, leaning down to kiss a doll on the lips. The toy, a prop from Wayans' latest movie, "A Haunted House 2," was propped up in a chair across the table from the actor at a stuffy Beverly Hills restaurant. The doll, named Abigail, was meant to resemble a creepy figurine from 2013's "The Conjuring": Both shared the same dead green eyes, sooty peasant dress and pigtail braids. Wayans, 41, has long been known for his outrageous comic taste. He dressed as a Caucasian female FBI agent in "White Chicks" and has been poking fun at the horror genre for years, launching the hit "Scary Movie" parody franchise in 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Comedies starring Paul Rudd and Julianne Moore, a new drama from Neil LaBute and documentaries about personalities such as Richard Pryor, Gore Vidal and Elaine Stritch will be some of the films world-premiering in the Tribeca Film Festival's Spotlight section. Festival organizers announced Wednesday that among the notable scripted tales will be Craig Zisk's “The English Teacher,” in which Moore stars as an educator whose life is shaken by a former prized pupil, and Phil Morrison's "Almost Christmas," an odd-couple comedy about two bumbling French-Canadians played by Paul Rudd and Paul Giamatti (and evokes for this reporter the possibility of a Kevin Kline-esque set of fake French accents)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2005 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
Richard Pryor, whose blunt, blue and brilliant comedic confrontations confidently tackled what many stand-up comics before him deemed too shocking to broach, died early Saturday. He was 65. Pryor suffered a heart attack at his home in the San Fernando Valley. He was pronounced dead at a nearby hospital. The comedian's body of work, a political movement in itself, was steeped in race, class and social commentary, and encompassed the stage, screen, records and television.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Comedian Richard Pryor was in stable condition today in a Brisbane hospital after suffering a minor heart attack three days ago, hospital officials said. Pryor was admitted Tuesday to Wesley Hospital after complaining of chest pains, according to hospital spokeswoman Janice Wyatte. She said doctors diagnosed a "minor heart attack" after conducting tests on the 49-year-old entertainer. She said Pryor has been in "very stable condition" since his admission, and has suffered no complications.
REAL ESTATE
November 30, 1986 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Actor/comedian Richard Pryor has purchased a home in Bel Air Place--that enclave of new, luxurious abodes off Moraga Drive that was once the estate of the late Howard Hawks, who directed such films as "The Thing" in 1951 and "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" in 1953. Pryor bought his five-bedroom, Santa Fe-style house from builder Marvin Smith.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1986 | DAVID T. FRIENDLY
Richard Pryor has come apart. Out of cocaine and out of solutions, he reaches for the bottle of Bacardi 151 Rum on the bedroom dresser and douses himself with liquor. Then he flicks his lighter and ignites himself into a human fireball. This harrowing scene occurs near the end of Pryor's new semi-autobiographical film, "Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life Is Calling," and Pryor now admits that on June 9, 1980, he was ready to take his own life. "It was a horror, an absolute horror.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1995 | DENNIS HUNT
In the '70s, before movie stardom dulled his stand-up skills, Pryor made comedy albums that have been reference material for young comics ever since. Some of the material, such as the Vietnamese jokes, is dated on this 1975 release, but most of it is still fresh and hilarious. Album reissues are rated on a scale of one star (poor), two stars (fair), three stars (good) and four stars (essential).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Susan King
Director Michael Campus vividly recalls the reaction to his film "The Mack" from the opening-night audience 40 years ago in Oakland. The film, starring Max Julien as the charismatic pimp Goldie and Richard Pryor as his friend Slim, had shot in the Bay Area city. "The first scene came on with Richie and Max and - I am not exaggerating - the whole audience stood up and started screaming back at the screen," Campus said. "They never sat down. No one had shown that world - no one had portrayed the black underworld.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Two men living decades apart have two key things in common: They lived in Los Angeles, and they were two of the funniest men ever. Harold Lloyd was one of the great silent clowns, and 1923's “Safety Last” was one of his classic roles, the source of one of the best-known images from the entire silent-film era: Lloyd dangling above the Los Angeles skyline, hanging from the hands of an enormous clock. The Criterion Collection provides a newly restored version of “Safety Last!” as well as numerous extras, including a documentary (“The Third Genius”)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Susan King
Pioneering African American comic and actor Richard Pryor has been dead for eight years but his influence and legacy are as strong as ever. Last month, Showtime aired a new documentary on this turbulent life, "Richard Pryor: Omit the Logic. " On Tuesday, Shout! Factory released "No Pryor Restraint: Life in Concert. " The set features seven CDS and two DVDs of his stand-up work spanning the years 1966-1992. And on Friday, the American Cinematheque's Aero Theatre in Santa Monica will present two of his landmark performance films: 1979's "Richard Pryor: Live in Concert" and 1982's "Richard Pryor Live on the Sunset Strip.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Stand down, America. "The Voice's" Adam Levine may not actually hate you. The Maroon 5 frontman and coach for the hit NBC singing competition show stirred up the Internet outrage machine on Tuesday night when he was heard saying, "I hate this country" while waiting to hear the results of a nationwide vote that would determine the fate of two of this team members (they were both voted off the show). Outrage followed, with people calling for Levine to be fired from the show or even deported, but in an interview airing on "CBS This Morning" on Sunday (and recorded before he made his "Voice" comments)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Richard Pryor died in 2005 at the age of 65 from a heart attack related to multiple sclerosis. The unexpected thing, given his life and habits and health, was not that he died so young but that he lived so long. Marina Zenovich's enlightening biographical documentary, "Richard Pryor: Omit the Logic," which premieres Friday on Showtime, opens in the aftermath of Pryor's famous 1980 self-immolation - a suicide attempt, the film argues, and not an accident related to freebasing cocaine, as was speculated.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Though his time in the national spotlight amounted to only about a decade, Clerow "Flip" Wilson was one of the great comic voices of the 20th century, a compact fireball whose early-1970s NBC variety series embedded characters such as the Reverend Leroy of the Church of What's Happening Now and Geraldine Jones (a self-assured bundle of sass whose catchphrases were "The devil made me do it" and "What you see is what you get") in the national consciousness. As portrayed in Kevin Cook's new and overdue biography, "Flip: The Inside Story of TV's First Black Superstar" - which nicks its subtitle from a 1972 Time magazine cover story - Wilson was a more troubled person than his easy and attractive onstage demeanor would suggest.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Comedian and actor Richard Pryor has sued two New Jersey music companies, alleging they licensed his recorded material without legal authorization. Pryor, one of the most influential comedians of the 1970s, accused San Juan Music Group Ltd.; its president, Michael Chernow; and M.B. Music Inc. of illegally transferring master recordings that he first made in the late 1970s for Laff Records. The lawsuit says Pryor sued Laff in 1984 and won control of the masters in 1987.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - In 11 previous editions, the Tribeca Film Festival has showcased dozens of glitzy studio productions and stars - Tobey Maguire and his "Spider-Man 3" crew rode into town in 2007, Tom Cruise opened "Mission: Impossible III" here in 2006 and last year Joss Whedon world-premiered "The Avengers" on closing night. But when Tribeca's 12th edition opens Wednesday, most of the famous names won't arrive via big-budget Hollywood movies - they'll come as documentary subjects. This cinematic rite of spring has eschewed the splashy studio premiere this year, opening instead with a documentary about the niche rock band the National ("Mistaken for Strangers")
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Comedies starring Paul Rudd and Julianne Moore, a new drama from Neil LaBute and documentaries about personalities such as Richard Pryor, Gore Vidal and Elaine Stritch will be some of the films world-premiering in the Tribeca Film Festival's Spotlight section. Festival organizers announced Wednesday that among the notable scripted tales will be Craig Zisk's “The English Teacher,” in which Moore stars as an educator whose life is shaken by a former prized pupil, and Phil Morrison's "Almost Christmas," an odd-couple comedy about two bumbling French-Canadians played by Paul Rudd and Paul Giamatti (and evokes for this reporter the possibility of a Kevin Kline-esque set of fake French accents)
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