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Richard Pryor

ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1996
Comedian Richard Pryor will receive a special humanitarian award from the Sheenway School & Culture Center during the school's silver anniversary dinner at the Comedy Store on Sunday. Pryor will be honored for his longtime commitment to the South-Central school, which works to teach at-risk children and keep them out of gangs. The event is co-chaired by Lionel Richie and Jodie Foster. Tickets are $100. Information: (213) 757-8359.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2006 | Richard Cromelin
David Bowie, Cream, Merle Haggard, Robert Johnson, Jessye Norman, Richard Pryor and the Weavers have been named recipients of the Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award, which honors "lifelong artistic contributions to the recording medium," the academy said Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1988
Who the hell does Kinison, the angry dog spraying on anything/anyone, think he is when he equates himself with Charles Bukowski?! Bukowski's writings may or may not be misogynist, but there's substance in what he says. His is an adult view of the up and down of life leavened with self-deprecating humor, unlike the adolescent napalm vomit of Kinison. As for Patrick Goldstein's comparison of Kinison (albeit remotely) with Lenny Bruce and Richard Pryor, it's the lamest thing I've heard since Quayle likened himself to JFK. ROSE MEDINA Pasadena
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Though his time in the national spotlight amounted to only about a decade, Clerow "Flip" Wilson was one of the great comic voices of the 20th century, a compact fireball whose early-1970s NBC variety series embedded characters such as the Reverend Leroy of the Church of What's Happening Now and Geraldine Jones (a self-assured bundle of sass whose catchphrases were "The devil made me do it" and "What you see is what you get") in the national consciousness. As portrayed in Kevin Cook's new and overdue biography, "Flip: The Inside Story of TV's First Black Superstar" - which nicks its subtitle from a 1972 Time magazine cover story - Wilson was a more troubled person than his easy and attractive onstage demeanor would suggest.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1989
I am debating whether to see the new movie comedy smash, "See No Evil, Hear No Evil" or wait for the sequel, which is sure to be on the drawing boards. Can you imagine what the stars, Richard Pryor and Gene Wilder (who play a blind man and a deaf man, respectively) and producer Marvin Worth and director Arthur Hiller could do with epilepsy, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease? Wouldn't those be blockbusters? And kudos to such eminent critics as Kevin Thomas (May 12 review)
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