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Richard Quick

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2009 | Claire Noland
Richard Quick, a swim coach who won a record 13 NCAA titles at Auburn, Stanford and Texas and also led the U.S. Olympic teams in 1988, 1996 and 2000, died Wednesday in Austin, Texas. He was 66 and had been diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor in December. Quick won seven women's collegiate titles at Stanford University and five at the University of Texas, and this spring guided Auburn University's men's team to the national championship. In three trips to the Olympics as head coach of the U.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2009 | Claire Noland
Richard Quick, a swim coach who won a record 13 NCAA titles at Auburn, Stanford and Texas and also led the U.S. Olympic teams in 1988, 1996 and 2000, died Wednesday in Austin, Texas. He was 66 and had been diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor in December. Quick won seven women's collegiate titles at Stanford University and five at the University of Texas, and this spring guided Auburn University's men's team to the national championship. In three trips to the Olympics as head coach of the U.
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SPORTS
July 30, 1988
Richard Quick, whose University of Texas women's swimming teams have won the last five National Collegiate Athletic Assn. titles, said he has been offered the vacant job of women's coach at Stanford.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | RANDY HARVEY
The Netherlands' Inge De Bruijn broke her own world record Wednesday night in the 100-meter freestyle and then reached over for a hug from her rival in the next lane, the United States' Jenny Thompson. She obliged, but De Bruijn shouldn't expect flowers any time soon. Thompson later shot her a glare so searing that, well, let's just say that she could have ignited the flame over the Olympic Stadium during the opening ceremony without a torch. What was she saying with that look?
SPORTS
October 17, 1991 | THERESA MUNOZ
Stanford Coach Richard Quick, the head coach of the 1988 U.S. Olympic swim team, resigned Tuesday as assistant U.S. women's coach for the 1992 Olympic Games. Dick Shoulburg of the Foxcatcher (Pa.) Swim Team was selected by a U.S. Swimming coaching selection committee to replace Quick as the top assistant to Mark Schubert, the women's head coach. Shoulburg was head women's coach for the Pan American Games at Havana last August.
NEWS
November 2, 1987
A small experimental plane crashed behind a home in Ramona in rural San Diego County, seriously injuring the pilot, but no one on the ground was hurt, authorities said. Richard Quick, a pilot who shares a hangar with the injured man, identified the pilot of the small craft as Rob Lipner, an experienced pilot in his 50s. Lipner was flying alone in a single-seat, single-engine Moni, a light aircraft that is licensed as experimental and built from a kit, Quick said.
SPORTS
August 3, 1989 | TRACY DODDS, Times Staff Writer
Richard Quick, coach of the 1988 U.S. Olympic team and currently the coach of the Stanford women's swimming team, responded Wednesday to a published report suggesting that the pressure he put on his athletes at the University of Texas contributed to their eating disorders. "I was aware of a few eating disorders on our team at the University of Texas," said Quick, who was at the national long course meet at USC.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | RANDY HARVEY
The Netherlands' Inge De Bruijn broke her own world record Wednesday night in the 100-meter freestyle and then reached over for a hug from her rival in the next lane, the United States' Jenny Thompson. She obliged, but De Bruijn shouldn't expect flowers any time soon. Thompson later shot her a glare so searing that, well, let's just say that she could have ignited the flame over the Olympic Stadium during the opening ceremony without a torch. What was she saying with that look?
SPORTS
October 28, 1988 | Tracy Dodds
The 44 United States swimmers who competed in the Olympics at Seoul were accompanied and advised by a contingent of 17 coaches, including Richard Quick, the designated head coach. Quick, as coach of the outstanding University of Texas women's team, had several of his Longhorn swimmers on the U.S. team. He was responsible for coaching them all the way through, as well as making the decisions about which swimmers would swim which legs of relays.
SPORTS
April 20, 1991
Suvan Geer's March 26 review of On Kawara's paintings praised his obsession with monochromatic canvases, which have on them nothing more than a date for each day of the year, as some form of idealism. To Geer, this repetitive formula "is almost a spiritual detachment. . . . It is simply the fact of his existence that must be considered as giving him value as an artist, not the art objects he produces."
SPORTS
October 17, 1991 | THERESA MUNOZ
Stanford Coach Richard Quick, the head coach of the 1988 U.S. Olympic swim team, resigned Tuesday as assistant U.S. women's coach for the 1992 Olympic Games. Dick Shoulburg of the Foxcatcher (Pa.) Swim Team was selected by a U.S. Swimming coaching selection committee to replace Quick as the top assistant to Mark Schubert, the women's head coach. Shoulburg was head women's coach for the Pan American Games at Havana last August.
SPORTS
April 20, 1991
Suvan Geer's March 26 review of On Kawara's paintings praised his obsession with monochromatic canvases, which have on them nothing more than a date for each day of the year, as some form of idealism. To Geer, this repetitive formula "is almost a spiritual detachment. . . . It is simply the fact of his existence that must be considered as giving him value as an artist, not the art objects he produces."
SPORTS
August 3, 1989 | TRACY DODDS, Times Staff Writer
Richard Quick, coach of the 1988 U.S. Olympic team and currently the coach of the Stanford women's swimming team, responded Wednesday to a published report suggesting that the pressure he put on his athletes at the University of Texas contributed to their eating disorders. "I was aware of a few eating disorders on our team at the University of Texas," said Quick, who was at the national long course meet at USC.
SPORTS
October 28, 1988 | Tracy Dodds
The 44 United States swimmers who competed in the Olympics at Seoul were accompanied and advised by a contingent of 17 coaches, including Richard Quick, the designated head coach. Quick, as coach of the outstanding University of Texas women's team, had several of his Longhorn swimmers on the U.S. team. He was responsible for coaching them all the way through, as well as making the decisions about which swimmers would swim which legs of relays.
SPORTS
July 30, 1988
Richard Quick, whose University of Texas women's swimming teams have won the last five National Collegiate Athletic Assn. titles, said he has been offered the vacant job of women's coach at Stanford.
NEWS
November 2, 1987
A small experimental plane crashed behind a home in Ramona in rural San Diego County, seriously injuring the pilot, but no one on the ground was hurt, authorities said. Richard Quick, a pilot who shares a hangar with the injured man, identified the pilot of the small craft as Rob Lipner, an experienced pilot in his 50s. Lipner was flying alone in a single-seat, single-engine Moni, a light aircraft that is licensed as experimental and built from a kit, Quick said.
SPORTS
October 16, 1990 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National swim team coaches from the United States, Hong Kong and Australia suspect the Chinese women's team of using steroids in the wake of China's world-best performances during last month's Asian Games. Richard Quick, coach of the U.S. national team and Stanford women's team, said he felt obligated to speak out after the Chinese produced three times that rank No. 1 in the world this year and three others that are No. 2 during the competition at Beijing.
SPORTS
November 17, 1994 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Criticism of the powerful Chinese women's swimming team at September's World Championships in Rome gained validity Wednesday when it was announced Yang Aihua tested positive for the muscle-building hormone testosterone. Yang, the 400-meter freestyle world champion, became the fifth Chinese swimmer to test positive for a banned substance in 20 months. Three were for anabolic steroids, one for ephedrine, a stimulant.
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