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Richard Quirk

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NEWS
May 3, 1987 | DAVID HOLLEY
Richard Quirk, 61, a white-haired man with a quick smile and down-home manner, retired in 1978 after 28 years of working in various enforcement positions with the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. He and his wife were living in a Florida trailer park when they got a letter earlier this year inviting him to temporarily rejoin the service to help grant amnesty to the illegal aliens he had spent so many years trying to hunt down.
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NEWS
May 3, 1987 | DAVID HOLLEY
Richard Quirk, 61, a white-haired man with a quick smile and down-home manner, retired in 1978 after 28 years of working in various enforcement positions with the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. He and his wife were living in a Florida trailer park when they got a letter earlier this year inviting him to temporarily rejoin the service to help grant amnesty to the illegal aliens he had spent so many years trying to hunt down.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1987 | STEPHEN BRAUN and DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writers
The vast majority of illegal immigrants who have gone through the first phase of the amnesty program in Southern California in the last three weeks have been recommended for legal status and given temporary work cards, according to federal immigration officials. More than 5,300 immigrants out of about 5,800 interviewed by Thursday in California and neighboring western states, or about 90%, had been tentatively approved by government examiners for legal status.
SPORTS
October 24, 1987 | ANN KILLION, Times Staff Writer
When the Saddleback High School football team came out of the locker room at halftime Friday night, homecoming fireworks were exploding in the sky above Newport Harbor High School's Davidson Field. The Saddleback players glanced in the air, shrugged and started to stretch. And the Roadrunners continued to ignore Newport Harbor's airs on their way to a 24-6 Sea View League victory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1987 | PATT MORRISON, Times Staff Writer
The rented furniture hadn't arrived and the front door was still locked when people began dropping by the vacant-looking Wilshire Boulevard office building early Monday. The visitors were undocumented aliens who had come wanting documents--the official U.S. government paper work that, under a landmark immigration amnesty law, will put them on the path toward legal status in the country where they have lived and worked so long as paper shadows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1987 | PATT MORRISON and RAY PEREZ, Times Staff Writers
The rented offices across the Southland--some of the 36 set up from Phoenix to Guam--were not even officially open Monday. Many were still unmarked, unfurnished and smelling of wet paint. But hundreds of aliens found them anyway, wanting to be the first to pick up the forms--a six-page application, medical exam form, fingerprint card--that could earn them amnesty, and a coveted green card. This was the official U.S.
NEWS
May 3, 1987 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Years of impassioned debate over immigration reform and months of tedious planning to implement it have been translated into the details of desks, chairs, computers and new employees who will begin Tuesday the massive task of granting amnesty to as many as 4 million illegal aliens. At stake are both clerical and philosophical questions. Can the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service handle the expected crush? And can it do so fairly? The agency says it can, but many critics predict chaos.
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