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Richard Ramirez

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2013 | By Richard Winton
Richard Ramirez - the infamous  serial killer  who died while on San Quentin's death row after being convicted of 13 murders - died of complications of blood cancer. Ramirez, died June 7 at 9:10 a.m. while receiving treatment at Marin General Hospital in Greenbrae, Calif. The Marin County coroner's office said Ramirez, one of the nation's most infamous serial killers, died of complications related to B-cell lymphoma In addition, at the time of his death Ramirez had other significant conditions, including "chronic substance abuse and chronic hepatitis C viral infection.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2014 | David Colker
In 1989, attorney Ray Clark got a telephone call that would make him, for a while, one of the most famous lawyers in Los Angeles. The call to his small firm was from the presiding judge in the trial of Richard Ramirez, accused of being the brutal serial killer known as the Night Stalker. The defense team that Ramirez's family had hired was falling apart, and the judge wanted Clark to take over as lead defense counsel. Clark agreed, and soon became a fixture in printed and broadcast news accounts, protesting his client's innocence.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2013 | By Kate Mather, This post has been corrected, as noted below.
Richard Ramirez, the "Night Stalker" serial killer who terrorized California with a series of break-in murders in the 1980s, has died, state corrections officials confirmed to the Times. Ramirez was 53. He died Friday morning of natural causes at Marin General Hospital, state Department of Corrections spokeswoman Deborah Hoffman said. Ramirez was serving time on Death Row at San Quentin. Ramirez went on a months-long rampage of sexual assault and murder that generated widespread fear throughout Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2013 | By Paige St. John
California prison officials said Monday that the death this month of "Night Stalker" Richard Ramirez was due to complications from lymphoma, a cancer often associated with hepatitis. Ramirez, a serial killer convicted of murdering 13 people and brutally assaulting others, died June 7 at a community hospital near San Quentin Prison, where he had been on death row for nearly two decades. He was 53. According to the California corrections department, the Marin County coroner concluded Monday that Ramirez had died from complications of B-cell lymphoma, a cancer of the lymphatic system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Richard Ramirez, the serial killer known as the Night Stalker who terrorized Los Angeles County and was convicted in 1989 of 13 murders, died Friday morning, California corrections officials said. He was 53. Ramirez died of natural causes in Marin General Hospital, the department said in a statement. No other details were released. Sentenced to death, Ramirez, who was housed at San Quentin, was one of 735 offenders facing execution and one of 59 who died from natural causes since capital punishment in California was reinstated in 1978.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein and Kate Mather
For sheriff's Capt. Andres Ramirez, Aug. 31, 1985, was "one of those dates you can never forget. Then 25 and a young deputy assigned to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department East L.A. station, Ramirez was heading that afternoon to what he thought was a routine call -- a 415 disturbance, a possible fight. He was just around the corner from the 3800 block of Hubbard Street, so he responded “like I would any other call,” he said. On Hubbard Street, he found a man sitting on the sidewalk, leaning up against a fence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1989
In response to the Night Stalker case, I note two ironies. To quote The Times, "At the height of the Night Stalker terror in the summer of 1985, about $80,000 in reward money was pledged" (Part I, Sept. 21). It's ironic that the distribution of the reward money, pledged by the city, county, public agencies and other groups, is being balked now that Ramirez has been convicted. It's ironic because the trial has cost over $1 million yet the reward, which was an incentive for private citizens to identify and capture the suspect, is a small amount to pay back to the citizens for their role in stopping a criminal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge appointed an additional lawyer Monday to help defend Night Stalker suspect Richard Ramirez, bringing to three the number of defense lawyers in the case. The appointment of Ray C. Clark was announced by Judge Michael A. Tynan as testimony resumed in the case after a two-week hiatus because of nervous exhaustion on the part of lead defense lawyer Daniel V. Hernandez. Clark's appointment means that the public cost of the much-delayed trial--about $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2013 | By Hector Becerra
Dave Munoz is proud of his East Los Angeles neighborhood. “This is where they caught him,” the 20-year-old college student said Friday. “They caught him on my street. Richard Ramirez. My neighbors caught him.” Hubbard Street is where Richard “The Night Stalker” Ramirez's murderous rampage finally came to an end, at the hands of neighbors who beat and captured him as he tried to steal two cars and assaulted a woman.  The capture and arrest of Ramirez turned Hubbard Street into a street of "heroes.
NEWS
October 3, 1996 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She will wear white lace. He'll be in jeans. Her ring is gold; his is platinum. She is Catholic; he worships Satan. If love does indeed conquer all, and this bride is betting her life that it does, then "Night Stalker" Richard Ramirez and former magazine editor Doreen Lioy should live happily ever after. Or, at least until death do them part--which, in view of the fact that the groom resides on death row, is more likely to occur sooner than later.
OPINION
June 11, 2013
Re "'Night Stalker' lived violently, dies in his hospital bed," June 8 The fact that serial killer Richard Ramirez was able to die of natural causes while on California's death row shows the injustice of our justice system. His victims suffered. Many died. Ramirez's living all these years while those he killed laid in graves was wrong. His being able to live off a system because of rights and laws is a slap in the face to everyone he hurt. After all, his victims were not protected like he was. Ramirez was guilty, and nothing changed that over time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein, Rong-Gong Lin II and Hector Becerra
The death of "Night Stalker" serial killer Richard Ramirez on Friday at the age of 53 brought satisfaction and even some cheers from people involved in the infamous case. Some victims and their relatives said Ramirez should have been executed long ago. "It's about time," said Bill Carns, one of the last people attacked by Ramirez. Carns was left partially paralyzed after Ramirez broke into his Mission Viejo house in August 1985, shot him three times and raped his girlfriend. "He should have been put to death an awful long time ago. " Ramirez died Friday morning of natural causes at Marin General Hospital, state corrections officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein and Kate Mather
For sheriff's Capt. Andres Ramirez, Aug. 31, 1985, was "one of those dates you can never forget. Then 25 and a young deputy assigned to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department East L.A. station, Ramirez was heading that afternoon to what he thought was a routine call -- a 415 disturbance, a possible fight. He was just around the corner from the 3800 block of Hubbard Street, so he responded “like I would any other call,” he said. On Hubbard Street, he found a man sitting on the sidewalk, leaning up against a fence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2013
Many remember the fear that swept across Southern California during “Night Stalker” Richard Ramirez's months-long rampage of sexual assault and murder in 1984 and '85. Ramirez died Friday morning of natural causes  at Marin General Hospital, state Department of Corrections spokeswoman Deborah Hoffman said. He was 53. A Los Angeles jury convicted him in the 13 killings. He was sentenced to death and had been serving time on death row in San Quentin since 1989. FROM THE ARCHIVES: Ramirez found guilty   In most of the cases, Ramirez entered homes in the early morning hours through open windows or doors.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
The strange saga of Richard Ramirez, the serial killer known as the "Night Stalker," who died Friday, had all the earmarks of a grungy low-budget thriller come to life. With his random, sensationalistic crimes, his startling capture by an angry mob and his notorious legion of admirers, Ramirez's rampage of death and mayhem was a disturbing tale seemingly tailor-made for Hollywood. There had already been a lineage of slasher and serial killer movies, from "Psycho" to "Halloween" and beyond, by the time Ramirez entered the popular consciousness in the mid-1980s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2013 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
Bill Carns and his girlfriend were the last people to be attacked by  Richard Ramirez, the "Night Stalker" serial killer who murdered 13 people in 1984 and '85 and was convicted of dozens of other felonies, including rape. On Friday, the day that Ramirez died of natural causes, Carns welcomed the death of his attacker. “It's about time,” Carns told The Times by telephone from his home in Bismarck, N.D. “Finally, justice has been served…. I'm glad it's over.” Carns was a 29-year-old electrical engineer living with his girlfriend in Mission Viejo in Orange County on the night of the attack.
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