Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRichard Ravitch
IN THE NEWS

Richard Ravitch

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
August 14, 1994 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They seem to go from morning to night--from Bryant Gumbel to David Brinkley to Larry King to Ted Koppel. Crossfire and under fire. Don Fehr, executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Assn., and Richard Ravitch, chief negotiator for the owners, have received more air time than Whitewater. It's the Dick and Don Show or, as others have suggested, Fehr and Loathing. The Brothers Grimm. Never have two officials supplied the same answers to the same questions on so many channels.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
December 10, 1994
The resignation of baseball's chief negotiator, Richard Ravitch, marks the situation's only progress in months. What the system now needs is to get rid of player representative Donald Fehr. STAN KAPLAN, Garden Grove The problem with baseball is there are not enough general managers who know the sport. Day in and day out you hear about some club offering a washed-up or overrated player a sizable contract on a chance. I'm not talking about Darryl Strawberry; I'm talking about Mitch Williams.
Advertisement
SPORTS
November 20, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Services
Richard Ravitch, a 58-year-old multimillionaire who ran New York City's subways and was an unsuccessful candidate for mayor in 1989, was hired by baseball owners as president and chief executive officer of their Player Relations Committee.
SPORTS
December 6, 1994 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Ravitch, who was recently replaced as chief labor negotiator for the major league baseball owners but whose salary-cap proposal they may soon implement, said Monday he will not seek an extension when his contract expires Dec. 31. Ravitch was hired at $750,000 a year in November 1991 to help develop a new economic system.
SPORTS
December 17, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Baseball's chief labor negotiator said owners should prove their financial difficulties to fans by making their books public. In an unusually frank public assessment of the sport's problems, Richard Ravitch, the owners' Player Relations Committee president, said that financial records should be released to the public on a team-by-team basis to prove that most clubs are losing money. "It probably would be a good thing if clubs disclose their profitability," Ravitch said.
SPORTS
December 10, 1994
The resignation of baseball's chief negotiator, Richard Ravitch, marks the situation's only progress in months. What the system now needs is to get rid of player representative Donald Fehr. STAN KAPLAN, Garden Grove The problem with baseball is there are not enough general managers who know the sport. Day in and day out you hear about some club offering a washed-up or overrated player a sizable contract on a chance. I'm not talking about Darryl Strawberry; I'm talking about Mitch Williams.
SPORTS
November 11, 1994 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Representatives of baseball owners and players noted an improved, civil atmosphere during a six-hour negotiating session with special mediator William J. Usery on Thursday, but there was no substantive progress and no indication either side is prepared to change its position on a salary cap.
SPORTS
August 9, 1994 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Baseball's labor negotiations took a bizarre twist Monday night when officials of the players' union denied player reports that owners' negotiator Richard Ravitch has promised a new proposal Friday if the players don't hold to their strike deadline of that day. Randy Myers, the Chicago Cubs player representative, said in a radio interview that union officials told him Ravitch made that offer during their negotiations Monday, but that the union regarded it as simply another ploy.
SPORTS
July 24, 1993 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
Don Fehr, Major League Players Assn. executive director, sent memos to the Angels and all players Friday preparing them for a potential strike in September. While it is the first time that Fehr directly informed the players of a possible strike, Richard Ravitch, president of the owners' Player Relations Committee, dismissed the possibility. "I don't believe that for a second," Ravitch said Friday.
SPORTS
February 17, 1993 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inching toward the selection of a commissioner and the restructuring of that office, major league baseball owners will try to iron out persistent wrinkles in the process during another special meeting in Phoenix today. There is some belief that the status of Richard Ravitch as president of the owners' Player Relations Committee and point man in labor negotiations with the players' union might be in jeopardy.
SPORTS
November 11, 1994 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Representatives of baseball owners and players noted an improved, civil atmosphere during a six-hour negotiating session with special mediator William J. Usery on Thursday, but there was no substantive progress and no indication either side is prepared to change its position on a salary cap.
SPORTS
August 23, 1994 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If federal mediators had hoped to defuse the rhetoric in baseball's collective bargaining dispute, the message was not received. There were more insults than insights Monday, most coming from Donald Fehr, executive director of the striking players union, who said the owners' negotiator, Richard Ravitch, lacked independence and was strictly a "hatchet man" for the owners.
SPORTS
August 20, 1994 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tom Geoghegan, a Chicago labor expert who extols the virtues of unionism, posed an interesting question recently: Without Frank Thomas or Ozzie Guillen, can there be the White Sox? "They can put together another team, but suppose Frank and Ozzie go across the street and somebody wants to set up the Green Sox?" Geoghegan said. "Who do you want to go see, Frank Thomas or some bush leaguer?" Who, indeed.
SPORTS
August 14, 1994 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They seem to go from morning to night--from Bryant Gumbel to David Brinkley to Larry King to Ted Koppel. Crossfire and under fire. Don Fehr, executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Assn., and Richard Ravitch, chief negotiator for the owners, have received more air time than Whitewater. It's the Dick and Don Show or, as others have suggested, Fehr and Loathing. The Brothers Grimm. Never have two officials supplied the same answers to the same questions on so many channels.
SPORTS
August 9, 1994 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Baseball's labor negotiations took a bizarre twist Monday night when officials of the players' union denied player reports that owners' negotiator Richard Ravitch has promised a new proposal Friday if the players don't hold to their strike deadline of that day. Randy Myers, the Chicago Cubs player representative, said in a radio interview that union officials told him Ravitch made that offer during their negotiations Monday, but that the union regarded it as simply another ploy.
SPORTS
July 24, 1993 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
Don Fehr, Major League Players Assn. executive director, sent memos to the Angels and all players Friday preparing them for a potential strike in September. While it is the first time that Fehr directly informed the players of a possible strike, Richard Ravitch, president of the owners' Player Relations Committee, dismissed the possibility. "I don't believe that for a second," Ravitch said Friday.
SPORTS
August 23, 1994 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If federal mediators had hoped to defuse the rhetoric in baseball's collective bargaining dispute, the message was not received. There were more insults than insights Monday, most coming from Donald Fehr, executive director of the striking players union, who said the owners' negotiator, Richard Ravitch, lacked independence and was strictly a "hatchet man" for the owners.
SPORTS
December 6, 1994 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Ravitch, who was recently replaced as chief labor negotiator for the major league baseball owners but whose salary-cap proposal they may soon implement, said Monday he will not seek an extension when his contract expires Dec. 31. Ravitch was hired at $750,000 a year in November 1991 to help develop a new economic system.
SPORTS
June 27, 1993 | JIM MURRAY
When you think of the great matchups in baseball history, you tend to think of Ty Cobb vs. Walter Johnson, Ruth vs. Lefty Grove, Carl Hubbell vs. Dizzy Dean, Gibson vs. Seaver, Koufax vs. Mays, Drysdale vs. Aaron. How about Ravitch vs. Fehr? The World Series or a pennant was often at stake in those other confrontations. Baseball itself may be the stake in this one. The proposition before these guys is, is the game doomed? Are we seeing the Last days of Pompeii here?
SPORTS
February 17, 1993 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inching toward the selection of a commissioner and the restructuring of that office, major league baseball owners will try to iron out persistent wrinkles in the process during another special meeting in Phoenix today. There is some belief that the status of Richard Ravitch as president of the owners' Player Relations Committee and point man in labor negotiations with the players' union might be in jeopardy.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|