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Richard Robert Redlin

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1994
What a great story about disabled actor Richard Robert Redlin appearing in "Hart to Hart." ("Richard Robert Redlin Looks Forward to a Different Role," May 6). From my experience as an extra, I do think terrible, old barriers are being torn down. I had polio in one leg and walk with a limp. However, it has not stopped directors from putting me in scenes with Warren Beatty, Robert Wagner, Danny Aiello and Connie Sellecca. Let me tell you, there are few greater triumphs than a director looking across a sea of extras and picking a disabled person to do a scene.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1994
What a great story about disabled actor Richard Robert Redlin appearing in "Hart to Hart." ("Richard Robert Redlin Looks Forward to a Different Role," May 6). From my experience as an extra, I do think terrible, old barriers are being torn down. I had polio in one leg and walk with a limp. However, it has not stopped directors from putting me in scenes with Warren Beatty, Robert Wagner, Danny Aiello and Connie Sellecca. Let me tell you, there are few greater triumphs than a director looking across a sea of extras and picking a disabled person to do a scene.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1994 | RAY LOYND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Actor Richard Robert Redlin, who walks with the support of forearm crutches, steadies what he calls his "sticks" and asks, "Did you ever notice how enamored movie makers are with disabled characters? And how seldom they hire disabled actors to play those roles?"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1994 | RAY LOYND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Actor Richard Robert Redlin, who walks with the support of forearm crutches, steadies what he calls his "sticks" and asks, "Did you ever notice how enamored movie makers are with disabled characters? And how seldom they hire disabled actors to play those roles?"
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1993 | JAN BRESLAUER
'Tis the season to be suicidal. That's the provocative premise behind Pauline Lepor's "Carol's Eve" at the Met Theatre. But this comedy about a woman thinking about flinging herself toward the pavement is ultimately just a preachy and predictable gloss on the under-explored topic of depression. Set on the balcony of a high-rent apartment, as a Christmas Eve party rages inside, "Carol's Eve" takes the simple "What if?"
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