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Richard Rodgers

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October 16, 2002 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
Hey, Barry Manilow: Richard Rodgers wrote the songs. With lyricists Lorenz Hart and, later, Oscar Hammerstein II, Rodgers reinvented musical theater and crafted some of the world's most enduring tunes. Just ask the folks in line for "Oklahoma!," which is back on Broadway in its latest revival.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2013 | By David C. Nichols
Though the late Lorenz Hart stands near-peerless among Broadway lyricists, his tortured private life remains largely untilled. That is, until “Falling for Make Believe” at the Colony Theatre, wherein a grand cast and 21 classic songs propel Mark Saltzman's musical study of Hart and his struggles with composer Richard Rodgers, the bottle and the closet. Flashing back to 1927 from Hart's 1943 funeral service, Saltzman's slightly overstuffed book gets the facts in while cleverly imagining undocumented occurrences.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2002 | RONAN TYNAN
It is the confluent timing of two events that compels me to respond to Howard Reich's article on Richard Rodgers ("He Composed Dreams of Urban and Middle America," May 11). Reich is a distinguished music critic and his article was informative, scholarly and suitably admiring. But one major thrust of its theme was painfully objectionable.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Lesley Ann Warren's first audition for the title role in CBS' 1965 version of the Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II musical, " Cinderella" was an unmitigated disaster. Warren was all of 18 but had garnered great notices for her supporting role as Snookie on Broadway in "110 in the Shade," the musical version of "The Rainmaker." "Cinderella" director Charles S. Dubin had seen Warren in "110" and thought she would be perfect. (Rodgers and Hammerstein's only original musical for TV had aired live to great acclaim in 1957 with Julie Andrews in the starring role.
BOOKS
November 15, 1998 | STEVEN BACH, Steven Bach is the author of "Final Cut," "Marlene Dietrich: Life and Legend" and a forthcoming biography of Moss Hart
Richard Rodgers may be the preeminent composer of the American musical theater. In his new biography, William G. Hyland calls him a "genius" and makes it seem pointless not to agree. It's not that Rodgers' legacy surpasses those of his principal peers--George Gershwin, Cole Porter, Jerome Kern and Irving Berlin--but that he left two distinct bodies of work, maybe even three.
NEWS
April 4, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1981, his first year with the company, Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization President Ted Chapin found several programs gathering dust in a closet. "There were all of these reels of film in closets all over the place," Chapin said. "I actually rented a 16-millimeter projector and set it up in the conference room and looked at all of the films." Most of the reels weren't very interesting to Chapin.
NEWS
December 10, 2001 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the 1920s and 1930s, during the first half of his phenomenal career as a composer of songs, Richard Rodgers worked with the dazzlingly witty and sophisticated lyricist Lorenz Hart. In the second half, starting in 1943, Rodgers joined forces with Oscar Hammerstein II, whose splendidly heartfelt lyrics provided a different, if equally fertile, kind of inspiration. One could easily spark an interminable debate as to which partnership produced Rodgers' best work.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2002 | HOWARD REICH, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
His music wasn't jazzy, like George Gershwin's, or sexually charged, like Cole Porter's, or steeped in the blues, like Harold Arlen's. It didn't rouse Americans to war, like George M. Cohan's, or otherwise exult in the red, white and blue, like Irving Berlin's.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Lesley Ann Warren's first audition for the title role in CBS' 1965 version of the Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II musical, " Cinderella" was an unmitigated disaster. Warren was all of 18 but had garnered great notices for her supporting role as Snookie on Broadway in "110 in the Shade," the musical version of "The Rainmaker." "Cinderella" director Charles S. Dubin had seen Warren in "110" and thought she would be perfect. (Rodgers and Hammerstein's only original musical for TV had aired live to great acclaim in 1957 with Julie Andrews in the starring role.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Dorothy Rodgers, the widow of Richard Rodgers, welcomed the renaming of a Broadway theater for the composer of such musicals as "Oklahoma!" "South Pacific," "The King and I" and "The Sound of Music." "It's such a great day for Dick," she said Tuesday at the renaming of the 46th Street Theater. The Richard Rodgers Theater, built in 1924, has been home to some of Broadway's biggest musical hits, including "Guys and Dolls," "Damn Yankees" and "How To Succeed in Business Without Really Trying."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2009 | Associated Press
Imagem Music Group, a Dutch music-publishing investment fund, has agreed to purchase the musical-theater catalog of Broadway giants Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II. No purchase price was announced, but the Wall Street Journal, citing unidentified sources, said the sale could bring in as much as $200 million. The deal gives Imagem licensing rights not only to such Rodgers and Hammerstein classics as "South Pacific," "Oklahoma!" and "The Sound of Music," but also to the works of more than 200 other writers, including Irving Berlin.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2007 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
Those familiar with Scott Bakula before he achieved wider renown in such television shows as "Quantum Leap" and "Star Trek: Enterprise" are well aware that he has his roots firmly in musical theater. In "No Strings," the vintage musical that features music and lyrics by Richard Rodgers and book by Samuel Taylor, Bakula gives heartening proof that his musical talents are undiminished.
WORLD
February 21, 2005 | Sonya Yee, Times Staff Writer
It may have introduced the world to the land of crisp apple strudel and schnitzel with noodles, but "The Sound of Music" has never been one of Austria's favorite things. Thanks to the musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein -- especially the 1965 film version starring Julie Andrews -- much of the world knows and loves the story of the singing Von Trapp family, who fled Austria after the Nazis took over in 1938.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2004 | Patrick Pacheco, Special to The Times
In the 1927-28 season, 264 productions opened on Broadway in 75 theaters. That's right -- 264. And of those more than 75 were musicals. Hard to believe today, when seven original musicals, the lifeblood of Broadway, would be considered a bumper crop. But at one time the Broadway musical was at the very center of the cultural life of this country, its stars, like Mae West, nationally famous, its songs on everyone's lips.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2004 | Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune
"If we can't come up with stuff that's new and fabulous and different that also sells tickets, well ... whose fault is that?" A dashing, somewhat fidgety amalgam of George Hamilton and Anthony Perkins, 39-year-old composer-lyricist Adam Guettel is explaining to a Goodman Theatre audience why Broadway gets the musicals it deserves. The discussion is titled "Musical Theater in the 21st Century."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2002 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
Hey, Barry Manilow: Richard Rodgers wrote the songs. With lyricists Lorenz Hart and, later, Oscar Hammerstein II, Rodgers reinvented musical theater and crafted some of the world's most enduring tunes. Just ask the folks in line for "Oklahoma!," which is back on Broadway in its latest revival.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1989
John Henken, in his Aug. 28 review of the Hollywood Bowl debut of mezzo Frederica von Stade, noted that the crowd of more than 10,000 was "curiously passive." The same attitude was present the next evening when the program was repeated. I think the audience was bored with the selections, except for a few familiar standbys. Someone seems to have searched the archives for composer Richard Rodgers' most obscure tunes, apparently forgetting that there are good reasons why certain songs are popular and others are not. Today's audience didn't like those selections any better than the original theatergoers did decades ago. LESLIE IRENE RICE, Ontario
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Rodgers is best known as one of the most successful--if not the most successful--Broadway musical composer of the 20th century. But he also wrote some of his greatest standards for the movies. With his first collaborator, lyricist Lorenz Hart, he penned the tunes "The Blue Room" and "Manhattan" for an all-but-forgotten 1929 musical short, "The Makers of Melody," and "Isn't It Romantic" for the 1932 feature, "Love Me Tonight."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2002 | RONAN TYNAN
It is the confluent timing of two events that compels me to respond to Howard Reich's article on Richard Rodgers ("He Composed Dreams of Urban and Middle America," May 11). Reich is a distinguished music critic and his article was informative, scholarly and suitably admiring. But one major thrust of its theme was painfully objectionable.
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