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Richard Rodriguez

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Richard Rodriguez's "Darling: A Spiritual Autobiography" appears at first to have been mistitled; it is neither a book about the spirit, strictly, nor an autobiography in any common sense. Rather, it's a collection of essays - some of which were originally published in Harper's, Kenyon Review and the Wilson Quarterly - that approach the larger questions of faith and character through a broad array of filters, from the 9/11 terrorist attacks to the legacy of Cesar Chavez, the collapse of newspapers to the reimagining of public space in a digital age. "I did not intend to write a spiritual autobiography," Rodriguez acknowledges in a brief "Note to the Reader.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Richard Rodriguez's "Darling: A Spiritual Autobiography" appears at first to have been mistitled; it is neither a book about the spirit, strictly, nor an autobiography in any common sense. Rather, it's a collection of essays - some of which were originally published in Harper's, Kenyon Review and the Wilson Quarterly - that approach the larger questions of faith and character through a broad array of filters, from the 9/11 terrorist attacks to the legacy of Cesar Chavez, the collapse of newspapers to the reimagining of public space in a digital age. "I did not intend to write a spiritual autobiography," Rodriguez acknowledges in a brief "Note to the Reader.
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NEWS
November 9, 1992 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Such a long face--such a long nose--sculpted by indifferent, blunt thumbs, and of such common clay. No one in my family had a face as dark or as Indian as mine. My face could not portray the ambition I brought to it. --Richard Rodriguez, From "Days of Obligation" Richard Rodriguez still hasn't come to grips. Forty-eight years and he still ponders daily the puzzle of how he looks versus who he is.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2009 | Hector Becerra
The attorney for a gang member kicked in the head by an El Monte police officer at the end of a televised car chase thinks his client has a great case. On Thursday, Nick Pacheco filed a $5-million legal claim against the city on behalf of the 23-year-old. But just in case, the attorney said his heavily tattooed client will be getting an extreme makeover in time for a trial, complete with a thick Tom Selleck mustache -- think "Magnum P.I."
BOOKS
November 15, 1992 | David Lohrey, Lohrey is a teacher in the Los Angeles Unified School District
The essay survives. With so much else in decline, America continues to produce essayists very close to the first rank. Practitioners as varied as Gore Vidal and Susan Sontag explore the dynamics of public expression. However, most critics, I suspect, would agree that this country since the Second World War has not produced a lyrical essayist who can match, say, Albert Camus for sheer talent. They may now have cause to revise their opinion.
NEWS
June 10, 2002 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pacific Heights is about as white a residential area as you can find anywhere. Perched above the glorious San Francisco Bay, the neighborhood is a place from which you can only look down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1990 | LUZ VILLARREAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Lawrence Rodriguez, who was acquitted of shooting an Anaheim couple in a murder-for-hire plot, was released from jail Friday night, saying his freedom "was like a dream." "I'm still in a state of shock," he said in a jailhouse interview before his release. "I had it in my mind frame that I was going to be sent to prison for the rest of my life."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1993 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Richard Rodriguez won a promotion to the lofty rank of chief deputy in the Ventura County Sheriff's Department, no one was surprised but Rodriguez himself. His colleagues say Rodriguez's steady competence had already propelled the longtime Oxnard resident from the police academy more than 26 years ago through a patrol car, the jail and the homicide division to the rank of lieutenant in 1986.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1990 | LUZ VILLARREAL and DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The murder-for-hire trial of Richard L. Rodriguez came to a surprise ending Thursday with his acquittal, despite dramatic testimony by the murder victim's wife that it was Rodriguez who shot them. After two days of deliberation, the jury found Rodriguez, 22, not guilty of conspiracy of murder in the shooting death of Anaheim financial analyst Owen L. Terry, 56, and of attempted murder in the shooting of Terry's wife, Pauline, now 52. Rodriguez also was acquitted of robbery and burglary charges.
MAGAZINE
October 11, 1987
In "The Hidden Legacy of the Missions" (Sept. 13), as I traveled back and forth in time and space with Richard Rodriguez, it became apparent that his writing style is entertaining but not frivolous, instructive but not pedantic. My appreciation. Althea Kapur Woodland Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2008 | Susannah Rosenblatt
An Orange County sheriff's deputy pleaded guilty Friday to falsely imprisoning prostitutes to sexually touch and photograph them under the guise of police work. Richard Rodriguez, 44, of Chino was convicted of two felony counts of false imprisonment by fraud and deceit in Orange County Superior Court. While in uniform, the deputy, assigned to the Orange County Transportation Authority, approached prostitutes along Harbor Boulevard in Garden Grove between November 2005 and March 2007, according to Orange County prosecutors.
NEWS
June 10, 2002 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pacific Heights is about as white a residential area as you can find anywhere. Perched above the glorious San Francisco Bay, the neighborhood is a place from which you can only look down.
BOOKS
March 24, 2002 | GREGORY RODRIGUEZ, Gregory Rodriguez is a senior fellow at the New America Foundation.
In his 1901 autobiography, Booker T. Washington recounts an incident he witnessed on a train that illustrates just how "difficult it sometimes is to know where the black begins and the white ends." He describes a conductor inspecting a light-skinned passenger seated in the "colored" compartment. The official examines the man's eyes, nose and hands. If the rider is Negro, he doesn't want to send him into the white coach. If he is white, he doesn't want to insult him by asking his race.
SPORTS
November 3, 2000 | BILL PLASCHKE
They step outside the cluttered kitchen that is Grandma's Original Tamales, onto a sidewalk brushed with a football breeze, two days before the game that brings them home again. Three attended Garfield. Three attended Roosevelt. Above them flaps a homemade banner celebrating today's 65th version of this rare high school rivalry. Around them flies the bull. "Garfield will win just like they did last year," says salesman Richard Rodriguez. "Oh, yeah? Who won the year before that?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1997
I do appreciate the poetic in the telling of the news. So I am always glad to read Richard Rodriguez's commentaries. "Letter From 2042, an L.A. Memory" (Commentary, April 27) is, I think, a marvelous example. As one who has lived in California since '49 and worked many years in L.A., I find his take on the history we are all a part of to be very accurate and healing as well. EDWIN P. SCANLAN Ojai
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1997
I do appreciate the poetic in the telling of the news. So I am always glad to read Richard Rodriguez's commentaries. "Letter From 2042, an L.A. Memory" (Commentary, April 27) is, I think, a marvelous example. As one who has lived in California since '49 and worked many years in L.A., I find his take on the history we are all a part of to be very accurate and healing as well. EDWIN P. SCANLAN Ojai
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1988
Richard Rodriguez is a hopeless aesthete. For him, art is what matters, not politics. His account of Cesar Chavez's fast strains to be poetic at any cost and in the end completely misrepresents a people and their struggle. This cannot be attributed solely to an Ivy League education nor to Rodriguez's undernourished memory, a memory candid enough to recall that in the 1960s the Harvard scholarship boy felt "embarrassed" by the union leader. Rather it is the result of a profound inability to understand political action as practiced by groups of activist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1993 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Richard Rodriguez won a promotion to the lofty rank of chief deputy in the Ventura County Sheriff's Department, no one was surprised but Rodriguez himself. His colleagues say Rodriguez's steady competence had already propelled the longtime Oxnard resident from the police academy more than 26 years ago through a patrol car, the jail and the homicide division to the rank of lieutenant in 1986.
BOOKS
November 15, 1992 | David Lohrey, Lohrey is a teacher in the Los Angeles Unified School District
The essay survives. With so much else in decline, America continues to produce essayists very close to the first rank. Practitioners as varied as Gore Vidal and Susan Sontag explore the dynamics of public expression. However, most critics, I suspect, would agree that this country since the Second World War has not produced a lyrical essayist who can match, say, Albert Camus for sheer talent. They may now have cause to revise their opinion.
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