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Richard Roeper

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2005
IN traversing the movie ads in Friday's Calendar, I found the following ratings from Roger Ebert and Richard Roeper: "Two Thumbs Up," "Two Very Big, Enthusiastic Thumbs Up," "Two Thumbs Way Up" and "Two Big Thumbs Up." Gee, I guess the regular "Thumbs Up" doesn't mean much anymore! JACK WOLF Westwood
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Stepping up to the plate today is the new film "42," a biopic about the legendary Jackie Robinson, who broke Major League Baseball's color line when he suited up for the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. The film is written and directed by Brian Helgeland, who won an Oscar for his "L.A. Confidential" screenplay, and stars newcomer Chadwick Boseman in the lead role. Given the inherent drama and heroism of Robinson's story and its roots in America's pastime, it would seem ripe for big-screen treatment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Chicago Sun-Times film critic Roger Ebert says he's cutting ties with the television show that he and the late Gene Siskel made famous. In an e-mail Monday, Ebert said Disney-ABC Domestic Television had decided to take the show "in a new direction" and he won't be associated with it. Ebert has been sidelined the last two years because of health issues that have robbed him of his voice. His announcement came a day after Chicago Sun-Times columnist Richard Roeper said he was leaving the nationally syndicated "At the Movies With Ebert & Roeper."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Roger Ebert's passing Thursday at age 70 leaves behind a staggering body of work: He reviewed as many as 285 movies a year, spent decades as a fixture on TV and published 17 books. Following are but a few highlights from his prolific career. Ebert began working as a film critic at the Chicago Sun-Times in April 1967. Among his first reviews was Arthur Penn's "Bonnie and Clyde," starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway. Ebert wrote , "Years from now it is quite possible that 'Bonnie and Clyde' will be seen as the definitive film of the 1960s, showing with sadness, humor and unforgiving detail what one society had come to. " A few years later, he wrote the screenplay for the exploitation film "Beyond the Valley of the Dolls" for Russ Meyer, though he would return to journalism before long.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2011 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Television Critic
It is impossible to overstate the influence of Roger Ebert, his late sparring partner Gene Siskel and the Chicago show they began on PBS that would become "Sneak Previews" and later "Siskel & Ebert at the Movies. " Growing out of the natural rivalry between two Chicago dailies ? Siskel worked for the Tribune, Ebert for the Sun-Times ? their weekly face-offs both demystified and popularized film criticism. That they very often disagreed was a weekly lesson in subjectivity. It made intelligent film criticism part of the public discourse, along with their signature "thumbs up/thumbs down.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2009 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
"At the Movies," the TV series that was (under a variety of names) the longtime home of bantering film critics Roger Ebert and the late Gene Siskel, premiered with two new hosts Sunday night, A.O. Scott of the New York Times and Michael Phillips of the Chicago Tribune (Siskel's old paper and corporate cousin to the Los Angeles Times, where Phillips had earlier worked and which still sometimes runs his reviews). Promo spots preceding its debut promised "two accomplished critics," "serious reviews from serious journalists" and "voices you trust," the implication being that the hosts being replaced, Ben Lyons (an E!
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2010 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
Film world: prepare for the war of the thumbs (again). Roger Ebert announced Friday on his Chicago Sun-Times blog that "At the Movies" would return to PBS stations in January. Produced by Ebert and his wife, Chaz, the weekly half-hour film review program — revamped as "Roger Ebert Presents At the Movies" — will continue the format first made famous by Ebert and the late Gene Siskel three decades ago, this time with film critics Christy Lemire of the Associated Press and Elvis Mitchell of NPR debating and issuing thumbs up or thumbs down reviews from red movie theater seats.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Roger Ebert's passing Thursday at age 70 leaves behind a staggering body of work: He reviewed as many as 285 movies a year, spent decades as a fixture on TV and published 17 books. Following are but a few highlights from his prolific career. Ebert began working as a film critic at the Chicago Sun-Times in April 1967. Among his first reviews was Arthur Penn's "Bonnie and Clyde," starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway. Ebert wrote , "Years from now it is quite possible that 'Bonnie and Clyde' will be seen as the definitive film of the 1960s, showing with sadness, humor and unforgiving detail what one society had come to. " A few years later, he wrote the screenplay for the exploitation film "Beyond the Valley of the Dolls" for Russ Meyer, though he would return to journalism before long.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Stepping up to the plate today is the new film "42," a biopic about the legendary Jackie Robinson, who broke Major League Baseball's color line when he suited up for the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. The film is written and directed by Brian Helgeland, who won an Oscar for his "L.A. Confidential" screenplay, and stars newcomer Chadwick Boseman in the lead role. Given the inherent drama and heroism of Robinson's story and its roots in America's pastime, it would seem ripe for big-screen treatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2002 | LORENZA MUNOZ
Depending on which direction their thumbs go, Roger Ebert and Richard Roeper can inspire or discourage people from shelling out $8 for a movie. Those thumbs, when pointing up, are worth millions to the studios. Ebert and Roeper are so popular that fans ask them for autographs. So perhaps it's no surprise that the studio that owns "Ebert & Roeper and the Movies," Disney's Buena Vista Television, is taking its franchise on vacation--sort of.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2011 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Television Critic
It is impossible to overstate the influence of Roger Ebert, his late sparring partner Gene Siskel and the Chicago show they began on PBS that would become "Sneak Previews" and later "Siskel & Ebert at the Movies. " Growing out of the natural rivalry between two Chicago dailies ? Siskel worked for the Tribune, Ebert for the Sun-Times ? their weekly face-offs both demystified and popularized film criticism. That they very often disagreed was a weekly lesson in subjectivity. It made intelligent film criticism part of the public discourse, along with their signature "thumbs up/thumbs down.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2010 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
Film world: prepare for the war of the thumbs (again). Roger Ebert announced Friday on his Chicago Sun-Times blog that "At the Movies" would return to PBS stations in January. Produced by Ebert and his wife, Chaz, the weekly half-hour film review program — revamped as "Roger Ebert Presents At the Movies" — will continue the format first made famous by Ebert and the late Gene Siskel three decades ago, this time with film critics Christy Lemire of the Associated Press and Elvis Mitchell of NPR debating and issuing thumbs up or thumbs down reviews from red movie theater seats.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2009 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
"At the Movies," the TV series that was (under a variety of names) the longtime home of bantering film critics Roger Ebert and the late Gene Siskel, premiered with two new hosts Sunday night, A.O. Scott of the New York Times and Michael Phillips of the Chicago Tribune (Siskel's old paper and corporate cousin to the Los Angeles Times, where Phillips had earlier worked and which still sometimes runs his reviews). Promo spots preceding its debut promised "two accomplished critics," "serious reviews from serious journalists" and "voices you trust," the implication being that the hosts being replaced, Ben Lyons (an E!
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Chicago Sun-Times film critic Roger Ebert says he's cutting ties with the television show that he and the late Gene Siskel made famous. In an e-mail Monday, Ebert said Disney-ABC Domestic Television had decided to take the show "in a new direction" and he won't be associated with it. Ebert has been sidelined the last two years because of health issues that have robbed him of his voice. His announcement came a day after Chicago Sun-Times columnist Richard Roeper said he was leaving the nationally syndicated "At the Movies With Ebert & Roeper."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2005
IN traversing the movie ads in Friday's Calendar, I found the following ratings from Roger Ebert and Richard Roeper: "Two Thumbs Up," "Two Very Big, Enthusiastic Thumbs Up," "Two Thumbs Way Up" and "Two Big Thumbs Up." Gee, I guess the regular "Thumbs Up" doesn't mean much anymore! JACK WOLF Westwood
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2002 | LORENZA MUNOZ
Depending on which direction their thumbs go, Roger Ebert and Richard Roeper can inspire or discourage people from shelling out $8 for a movie. Those thumbs, when pointing up, are worth millions to the studios. Ebert and Roeper are so popular that fans ask them for autographs. So perhaps it's no surprise that the studio that owns "Ebert & Roeper and the Movies," Disney's Buena Vista Television, is taking its franchise on vacation--sort of.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2000 | T.L. STANLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For those in the audience hoping for a film reviewer's version of "WWF Smackdown!,"Richard Roeper, as Roger Ebert's new on-air foil, has a bit of bad news. He won't be contrary just for the sake of it. But he won't be out for the count, either. "I've never thought about tailoring my opinions to be different from his," said Roeper, a Chicago Sun-Times columnist who was a guest host on "Roger Ebert & The Movies" about 10 times this year before recently landing his own chair in the balcony.
NATIONAL
July 3, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Film critic Roger Ebert, who has battled cancer in recent years, was in serious condition after an emergency operation to repair complications from an earlier cancer surgery. Richard Roeper, co-host of the "Ebert and Roeper" movie review show, said the 64-year-old's vital signs appeared good after surgery.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2000 | T.L. STANLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For those in the audience hoping for a film reviewer's version of "WWF Smackdown!,"Richard Roeper, as Roger Ebert's new on-air foil, has a bit of bad news. He won't be contrary just for the sake of it. But he won't be out for the count, either. "I've never thought about tailoring my opinions to be different from his," said Roeper, a Chicago Sun-Times columnist who was a guest host on "Roger Ebert & The Movies" about 10 times this year before recently landing his own chair in the balcony.
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