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Richard Roodberg

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SPORTS
April 6, 1990 | JEFF MEYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Roodberg has big news for runners who endure calluses, shin splints and creaky knees to get in shape for long-distance races: They never again have to actually run--or even leave the privacy of their own home--to become capable of finishing a marathon. Wait a minute, you say. According to convention, marathon runners are required to toughen their legs and their lungs by running as many as 100 miles a week over asphalt streets in smog. But Roodberg, 62, can back up his claim.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1995 | ROB FERNAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is Richard Roodberg a "notorious cheater," as one critic calls him, or a marvel of old age? Allegations of misconduct have dogged 67-year-old Roodberg since 1988, when he came from nowhere to post a world-record time in his age group at the Los Angeles Marathon. Roodberg was disqualified from that race--as well as the 1990 Los Angeles and Boston marathons--after officials said he failed to show up at any of the courses' checkpoints.
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SPORTS
August 25, 1990
The worst thing about the Richard Roodberg debacle (Aug. 19) is that The Times chose to waste so much space--two long articles of over 3,000 words--on this guy. In the space you used, you could have printed the results of every local masters track and field meet held this year. That would have been far more interesting and informative about what masters running is really like. There are dozens of fascinating, human-interest stories out there about senior runners. To focus on Roodberg is an embarrassment to The Times, and an insult to genuine over-40 athletes.
NEWS
May 14, 1995 | ROB FERNAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allegations of misconduct have dogged 67-year-old Richard Roodberg since 1988, when he came from nowhere to post a world-record time in his age group at the Los Angeles Marathon. The Van Nuys resident was disqualified from that race, as well as the 1990 L.A. and Boston marathons, after officials said he failed to show up at any of the courses' checkpoints. The allegations were that Roodberg did not run the entire races, charges he steadfastly denied in a 1990 interview with The Times.
NEWS
May 14, 1995 | ROB FERNAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allegations of misconduct have dogged 67-year-old Richard Roodberg since 1988, when he came from nowhere to post a world-record time in his age group at the Los Angeles Marathon. The Van Nuys resident was disqualified from that race, as well as the 1990 L.A. and Boston marathons, after officials said he failed to show up at any of the courses' checkpoints. The allegations were that Roodberg did not run the entire races, charges he steadfastly denied in a 1990 interview with The Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1995 | ROB FERNAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is Richard Roodberg a "notorious cheater," as one critic calls him, or a marvel of old age? Allegations of misconduct have dogged 67-year-old Roodberg since 1988, when he came from nowhere to post a world-record time in his age group at the Los Angeles Marathon. Roodberg was disqualified from that race--as well as the 1990 Los Angeles and Boston marathons--after officials said he failed to show up at any of the courses' checkpoints.
SPORTS
August 19, 1990 | JEFF MEYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Roodberg, 62, makes certain friends and acquaintances know about his seemingly ageless athletic ability. At his Van Nuys home, he displays a photo enlargement that shows him crossing the Los Angeles Marathon finish line in record time for a man his age. At his club, he hands out photocopies of a newspaper article that chronicles his running achievements.
OPINION
May 21, 1995
Regarding "Protest Again Following Runner, 67" (May 16), about Richard Roodberg, the runner accused of cheating in the L.A. Marathon: Several years ago my wife and I were following the marathon runners on our bikes. The course proceeded west on Hollywood Boulevard to Highland, then turned east on Sunset Boulevard and back to Vine Street. We decided to take a shortcut and head straight south on Vine and hook up with the runners there. To our surprise, we saw a prominent runner we both knew [not Roodberg]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1995 | ROB FERNAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Marathon, criticized recently for having an inadequate screening process, is acquiring new computer software that will enable race officials to "red-flag" runners charged with past misconduct, marathon President Bill Burke said. Burke said the technology will be in place this summer, in time for the 11th annual Los Angeles Marathon in 1996.
SPORTS
March 30, 1998
MEN 17 AND UNDER 1. Jose Garduno, Van Nuys, CA: 03:02:36 2. Elionai Gutierrez, Norwalk, CA: 03:03:05 3. Omar Ortega, North Hills, CA: 03:03:22 4. Gavin Kerr, El Segundo, CA: 03:05:46 5. Ignacio Pineda, Culver City, CA: 03:11:11 6. Juan Granados, North Hills, CA: 03:14:57 7. Javier Jimenez, Sylmar, CA: 03:14:58 8. Noah Klein, Los Angeles, CA: 03:19:44 9. Aaron Misakian, Raymond, CA: 03:20:23 10. Jonathan Williams, Thermal, CA: 03:21:07 MEN 18 TO 24 1. Zebedayo Bayo, Tanzania: 02:11:21 2.
SPORTS
August 25, 1990
The worst thing about the Richard Roodberg debacle (Aug. 19) is that The Times chose to waste so much space--two long articles of over 3,000 words--on this guy. In the space you used, you could have printed the results of every local masters track and field meet held this year. That would have been far more interesting and informative about what masters running is really like. There are dozens of fascinating, human-interest stories out there about senior runners. To focus on Roodberg is an embarrassment to The Times, and an insult to genuine over-40 athletes.
SPORTS
August 19, 1990 | JEFF MEYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Roodberg, 62, makes certain friends and acquaintances know about his seemingly ageless athletic ability. At his Van Nuys home, he displays a photo enlargement that shows him crossing the Los Angeles Marathon finish line in record time for a man his age. At his club, he hands out photocopies of a newspaper article that chronicles his running achievements.
SPORTS
April 6, 1990 | JEFF MEYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Roodberg has big news for runners who endure calluses, shin splints and creaky knees to get in shape for long-distance races: They never again have to actually run--or even leave the privacy of their own home--to become capable of finishing a marathon. Wait a minute, you say. According to convention, marathon runners are required to toughen their legs and their lungs by running as many as 100 miles a week over asphalt streets in smog. But Roodberg, 62, can back up his claim.
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