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Richard Ruppert

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BUSINESS
June 13, 1989
Union workers at General Motors' assembly plant in Van Nuys reelected Richard Ruppert as their chief representative, thus indicating continued worker support for a controversial, Japanese-style "team concept" management approach that the plant has used since 1987. Ruppert, who supports the concept, was one of 22 United Auto Workers union representatives elected by the plant's workers last week. He remained shop chairman, the top union position at the plant, by defeating team-concept foe Cal Gutierrez, said Joe Garcia, treasurer of UAW Local 645, which represents GM's hourly workers in Van Nuys.
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BUSINESS
June 13, 1989
Union workers at General Motors' assembly plant in Van Nuys reelected Richard Ruppert as their chief representative, thus indicating continued worker support for a controversial, Japanese-style "team concept" management approach that the plant has used since 1987. Ruppert, who supports the concept, was one of 22 United Auto Workers union representatives elected by the plant's workers last week. He remained shop chairman, the top union position at the plant, by defeating team-concept foe Cal Gutierrez, said Joe Garcia, treasurer of UAW Local 645, which represents GM's hourly workers in Van Nuys.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1987 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
The election Tuesday for the chairmanship of the union bargaining committee at the General Motors factory in Van Nuys is far more than a contest over who will hold the most powerful position in the United Auto Workers local at Southern California's last auto assembly plant. It is a contest that raises fundamental issues about just what a union should be in the late 1980s, and the results may be interpreted as a plebiscite on how workers feel about Japanese-style production methods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1987 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
The election Tuesday for the chairmanship of the union bargaining committee at the General Motors factory in Van Nuys is far more than a contest over who will hold the most powerful position in the United Auto Workers local at Southern California's last auto assembly plant. It is a contest that raises fundamental issues about just what a union should be in the late 1980s, and the results may be interpreted as a plebiscite on how workers feel about Japanese-style production methods.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | From Associated Press
By a narrow margin, workers at a General Motors plant elected as chairman of their powerful negotiating committee a fiery union traditionalist who opposes the Japanese-style production methods being put into operation there, it was announced today. Pete Beltran, 47, who stepped down as president of United Auto Workers Local 645 to run for negotiating chairman, defeated incumbent chairman Richard Ruppert by 116 votes, said union attorney Sunny Wise.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1990
I strongly object to "GM Internal Study Ranks Van Nuys Plant as Its Worst" (April 6), which resulted in an unfair characterization of the UAW work force at the plant. The numbers reported in The Times are only one part of a quality monitoring system. They are a result of soliciting feedback from our customers. Customer feedback is important, but it does not give the whole picture with regard to quality. The individual who purchases a high-performance sports car has different expectations than those who buy other models.
OPINION
January 12, 1992
Your article on the GM Rose Parade float ("Roses' Allure," Dec. 29) was inaccurate and misleading. UAW Local 645 did not vote to boycott the float. There was no attempt by the local union to discourage participation by our members. From its initiation the joint UAW/GM float was a symbol of the new participative work relationship, which was promoted by GM as critical to our survival. As workers, we met every challenge issued us in an attempt to keep our jobs. After GM's July announcement that it would cease operations at the Van Nuys plant in August, 1992, it became unacceptable to our membership that the UAW celebrate our joint relationship with General Motors on Jan. 1st. There is nothing to celebrate!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1990
I strongly object to the article in the business section of your paper April 6. The rush to be first with controversial headlines resulted in an unfair characterization of the United Auto Workers work force at the General Motors Van Nuys assembly plant. The Continuous Automotive Marketing Information Program numbers reported in The Times are only one part of a quality monitoring system. They are a result of soliciting feedback from our customers. We react to their concerns but also depend on other internal monitoring systems to ensure a quality product.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1992 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bringing an audience of beleaguered auto workers and state employees to their feet, the Rev. Jesse Jackson urged Democratic presidential candidates Friday to call "a truce on the negative attacks" and refocus their campaigns on jobs and health care for workers. "This is the time for those who would dare to become President to begin to attack the unmet needs of our country and not just attack each other," Jackson told a cheering audience of about 100 in Van Nuys.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1991 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors Corp., swamped with excess cars, said Thursday that it will indefinitely lay off about 850 of the 3,200 workers at its Van Nuys assembly plant, effective April 2. The announcement came one day after GM said it would indefinitely idle 975 workers at its Fairfax plant in Kansas City, Kan., which employs 3,000 and builds the Pontiac Grand Prix. The layoffs, which will occur as both plants cut back to one production shift from two, will be decided by seniority among the workers.
NEWS
June 5, 1987 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
Pete Beltran, a union traditionalist who opposes the Japanese-style "team concept" production system being put in place at General Motors' Van Nuys factory, was narrowly elected chairman of the union's in-plant bargaining committee, union officials announced Thursday. Beltran, 47, won a two-year term by defeating Richard Ruppert, 34, a more conciliatory union leader and a strong advocate of the team concept approach.
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