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May 20, 1988 | RICHARD S. SALANT, Salant was president of CBS News from 1961-'64 and again from 1966-'79. He served as vice chairman of NBC from 1979-'81. This article was adapted from William Benton Lecture delivered at U. of Chicago. and
Would it really be a loss if network news disappeared? Some people think it wouldn't. To them, the phrase broadcast journalism , especially the network kind, is a galloping oxymoron. Whatever it may be, they insist, it isn't journalism, and the nation would be better off without it. Having toiled most pleasantly in the network news vineyards for 20 years, I'm biased: I don't agree with these critics. I think that network news has been, and is, quite good.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1993 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
The death of former CBS News President Richard Salant on Tuesday recalls a period when the networks dominated television coverage of major events and, with Walter Cronkite as the primary figure, engendered a sense of public trust.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1993 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
The death of former CBS News President Richard Salant on Tuesday recalls a period when the networks dominated television coverage of major events and, with Walter Cronkite as the primary figure, engendered a sense of public trust.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1988 | RICHARD S. SALANT, Salant was president of CBS News from 1961-'64 and again from 1966-'79. He served as vice chairman of NBC from 1979-'81. This article was adapted from William Benton Lecture delivered at U. of Chicago. and
Would it really be a loss if network news disappeared? Some people think it wouldn't. To them, the phrase broadcast journalism , especially the network kind, is a galloping oxymoron. Whatever it may be, they insist, it isn't journalism, and the nation would be better off without it. Having toiled most pleasantly in the network news vineyards for 20 years, I'm biased: I don't agree with these critics. I think that network news has been, and is, quite good.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1989 | From Associated Press
NBC said today it will stop its use of controversial news re-creations and shift the only one of its programs that uses the technique from the news to the entertainment division. Maria Shriver and all other news staff members working on the show, "Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow," will be replaced, a news official said. Three "Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow" specials have aired since August. A fourth, which includes a re-creation segment, will air as scheduled Nov. 28 with the current staff.
NEWS
October 24, 1994 | From Associated Press
William A. Leonard, a CBS News veteran who influenced network media stars from Edward R. Murrow to Dan Rather and helped develop such shows as "60 Minutes," died Sunday of a stroke. He was 78. Leonard died at Laurel Regional Hospital, according to Tom Goodman, a spokesman for CBS. Leonard lived in nearby Washington. He was responsible for the selection of Rather to succeed Walter Cronkite as anchor of the "CBS Evening News."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2000 | From The Washington Post
Blair Clark, 82, a journalist, CBS network executive and avowed left-wing Democrat whose passion for liberal ideals was unfulfilled by his work as national campaign manager for Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy's unsuccessful bid for the 1968 Democratic presidential nomination, died Tuesday at Princeton Medical Center in New Jersey. He had colon surgery last month.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1985 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
Praised and panned by critics, CBS News' flashy, well-publicized "West 57th" news-magazinegot off to an unimpressive start in the ratings last week. Its debut was ranked 40th out of 64 prime-time shows aired, A.C. Nielsen Co. figures showed Tuesday. The series, which features four young reporters and a fast pace, has been called a venture in "Mod Squad news," an attempt to primarily appeal to well-heeled yuppie viewers--young urban professionals. CBS News emphatically denies this.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
"We don't mislead people, we come straight at them," said CBS anchorman Dan Rather on Tuesday as he defended his controversial, combative live television interview with Vice President George Bush. Surrounded by camera crews and reporters outside CBS News headquarters here, Rather denied Bush's claim that CBS misrepresented what the Monday night interview would be about.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
Just hours before the Super Bowl babble begins Sunday, CBS News' quiet, Thoreau-like "Sunday Morning" will start its 10th year with the day's news, followed by glimpses of its past nine years on the air. The show has had two recent changes. It now has a letters segment and a weather report, which former executive producer Shad Northshield dropped shortly after "Sunday" premiered, but which Charles Kuralt has brought back.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1985 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
British Broadcasting Corp. journalists were striking today to protest the BBC's cancellation--at the government's request--of "At the Edge of the Union," a documentary about extremism in Northern Ireland. The program in part profiles an alleged leader of the outlawed Irish Republican Army.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1985 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
CBS News, beset by morale problems, companywide budget cuts that forced the firings of 74 employees and continued low ratings for the "CBS Morning News," got its former president back Thursday, with Van Gordon Sauter named to succeed Edward M. Joyce. The unusual move had been rumored for two months.
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