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Richard Schickel

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2008 | Liz Brown, Special to The Times
For the last several years, Richard Schickel has been a regular contributor to the Los Angeles Times Book Review, writing primarily about books on film. His new book, "Film on Paper: The Inner Life of Movies," is a collection of many of those articles, as well as other pieces that appeared in the New York Times Book Review, the Atlantic and elsewhere. Schickel, the film critic for Time magazine since 1972, has written some 30 books, most recently a biography of Elia Kazan.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2013 | By Dennis McLellan
The work of special-effects pioneer Ray Harryhausen, who died Tuesday at 92, was chronicled in a 2004 memoir he wrote with British film historian Tony Dalton titled “Ray Harryhausen: An Animated Life.” In the book, Harryhausen noted that he was especially proud of the skeleton sword fight in the 1963 film “Jason and the Argonauts.” The complex sequence illustrates the time, patience and concentration such work entailed. PHOTOS: Ray Harryhausen - Career in pictures “I had three men fighting seven skeletons and each skeleton had five appendages to move in each separate frame of film,” he wrote in his book.
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NEWS
August 1, 1991 | CONSTANCE CASEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For moviegoing boys in their teens in the early '50s, the on-screen Marlon Brando was the confused but compelling young man they wished to be. As Richard Schickel puts it, a Brando hero was "rude and sensitive, inarticulate but painfully aware."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Above all else, Martin Scorsese is a character. Brilliant, brazen, engaging, esoteric, reverent, irreverent, ironic ? all are qualities that have forged the 68-year-old director into an unqualified master. Much revered, once reviled, Scorsese has created some of the most extraordinary work in modern cinema: the gangster leitmotif of "Mean Streets," "Goodfellas," "Casino" and "The Departed"; the awakening feminism of "Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore"; the brutal anger of "Taxi Driver" and "Raging Bull"; the unsettling treatise on fame in "The King of Comedy"; the respectful religious provocation of the much-maligned "The Last Temptation of Christ"; and on it goes.
BOOKS
April 6, 2003 | Paul Fussell, Paul Fussell is the author of numerous books, including "Wartime: Understanding and Behavior in the Second World War" and "Doing Battle: The Making of a Skeptic."
This cryptically titled book by the esteemed movie critic of Time magazine (and writer of the "Film on Paper" column for Book Review) is not as cute as the Zip stuff seems to threaten. By quoting this line from a popular World War I wake-up song (the next line goes, "with your hair cut just as short as mine"), Richard Schickel, in his book "Good Morning, Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Above all else, Martin Scorsese is a character. Brilliant, brazen, engaging, esoteric, reverent, irreverent, ironic ? all are qualities that have forged the 68-year-old director into an unqualified master. Much revered, once reviled, Scorsese has created some of the most extraordinary work in modern cinema: the gangster leitmotif of "Mean Streets," "Goodfellas," "Casino" and "The Departed"; the awakening feminism of "Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore"; the brutal anger of "Taxi Driver" and "Raging Bull"; the unsettling treatise on fame in "The King of Comedy"; the respectful religious provocation of the much-maligned "The Last Temptation of Christ"; and on it goes.
BOOKS
July 15, 1990 | Gavin Lambert, Lambert is a novelist, screenwriter and film historian. His latest book is "Norma Shearer."
"Garbo talks," the ad slogan for the film "Anna Christie," will also serve--with at least one question mark added--for this book, which is described in the jacket note as "based on a long and intimate friendship," and by the author as "the story of (Garbo's) life, as she told it to me, in that voice I will never forget."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2007
SPEAKING of his critical writing, Richard Schickel says on his website, "I've done my best to be serious and thoughtful. . . ." Not so much with his review of my book, "What Happens Next: A History of American Screenwriting" ["So That's Why They're So Grumpy," Dec. 13]. He finds the book "error-strewn" but offers no examples. He lays out my main themes and then chides me for what I left out.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Presumptuous: If you don't want any clues to the ending of "Presumed Innocent," steer clear of this week's review of the film in Time magazine. Warner Bros. warned the press in a memo at screenings not to reveal the ending, or whether Rusty Sabich (the public prosecutor played by Harrison Ford), who is accused of murder, is guilty or not, in order not to ruin the film for those who don't already know the ending to Scott Turow's book.
BOOKS
October 12, 1997
There were not many jokes in Richard Schickel's poison-pen "review" of my tome, "Man on the Flying Trapeze: The Life and Times of W. C. Fields" (Book Review, Sept. 28). The only good one was his denunciation of me as "too young and too English." I am in fact neither of these, being a somewhat shopworn Israeli-Scot. Of course, Schickel can only hate my book if he clings so fiercely, against all the evidence, to the belief that W. C. Fields was the same person off screen as on, a notion discredited by W. C.'s grandson Ronald Fields long before I began my own humble quest.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
I usually try to avoid getting into dust-ups with critics writing in my own newspaper, but I can't avoid coming to the late Robert Altman's defense after reading Richard Schickel's nasty, dismissive review last week of "Robert Altman: The Oral Biography" by Mitchell Zuckoff, a new book about the man who brought us "MASH," "McCabe & Mrs. Miller," "Nashville," "The Player," "Short Cuts," "Gosford Park" and any number of other smart, funny and challenging films....
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2008 | Liz Brown, Special to The Times
For the last several years, Richard Schickel has been a regular contributor to the Los Angeles Times Book Review, writing primarily about books on film. His new book, "Film on Paper: The Inner Life of Movies," is a collection of many of those articles, as well as other pieces that appeared in the New York Times Book Review, the Atlantic and elsewhere. Schickel, the film critic for Time magazine since 1972, has written some 30 books, most recently a biography of Elia Kazan.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2007
SPEAKING of his critical writing, Richard Schickel says on his website, "I've done my best to be serious and thoughtful. . . ." Not so much with his review of my book, "What Happens Next: A History of American Screenwriting" ["So That's Why They're So Grumpy," Dec. 13]. He finds the book "error-strewn" but offers no examples. He lays out my main themes and then chides me for what I left out.
OPINION
December 16, 2006
Re "Gibson's blood lust," Opinion, Dec. 13 I believe Richard Schickel missed the point of Mel Gibson's movie, "Apocalypto." Schickel objects to the very specific and staged Mayan human sacrifice scene, the still-beating heart and the bouncy-bounce of the tumbling, falling head. To him, this is horrid pornography. It would be better if it were more like "on-the-fly" mindless violence that we too often see inserted into other movies. The Mayans are lauded for their high culture and civilization.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Actors, authors, politicians, a Supreme Court justice and a Harvard astrophysicist were among the people who responded this year to Glenna Nowell's queries for her annual "Who Reads What?" list in time for National Library Week, which begins Sunday. Their responses ranged from the nice -- Rosalynn Carter's favorite is the Bible -- to the naughty: dirty joke books favored by writer Piers Anthony.
OPINION
March 3, 2006
Re "Oscar misses the big picture," Opinion, March 2 Why does every movie have to appeal to the mindless, the ill-informed, the indifferent? Our culture has been dumbed down enough by the tasteless, witless character of television sitcoms; by the feel-good, don't-worry, touchy-feely character of television news; by the mind-numbing idiocy of the right-wing talk shows and a value system that celebrates consumerism above everything else in life....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1995
In his essay, "Good Day at Pride Rock" (Aug. 16), Robert A. Jones claims I once said that "Disney's emotions seem to have been manufactured at a hidden platitude factory in Burbank and that they never vary whether the product is Snow White or Lion King." I have never said or written (or thought) any such thing--as perhaps the absence of quotation marks around the opinion attributed to me in Jones' piece may suggest to the alert reader. In a book I wrote long before the present management took over the company I registered a certain dubiety about the Disney sensibility of the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Actors, authors, politicians, a Supreme Court justice and a Harvard astrophysicist were among the people who responded this year to Glenna Nowell's queries for her annual "Who Reads What?" list in time for National Library Week, which begins Sunday. Their responses ranged from the nice -- Rosalynn Carter's favorite is the Bible -- to the naughty: dirty joke books favored by writer Piers Anthony.
BOOKS
November 13, 2005 | David Caute, David Caute is the author of many books, including "The Great Fear: The Anti-Communist Purge Under Truman and Eisenhower" and "The Dancer Defects: The Struggle for Cultural Supremacy During the Cold War." He is working on a study of contemporary American historians, "Beyond Denial."
FROM his formative years, Elia Kazan's role models among directors included Stanislavsky, Dovzhenko and the maestros of European expressionism. As a quintessentially American genius of stage and screen, passionately believing in "roots," Kazan unveiled Marlon Brando and James Dean for audiences far beyond America's shores. During his heyday (1930-60), Kazan virtually re-explored the terrain of Dos Passos' trilogy, "U.S.A." -- a continent and a Power wonderfully absorbed in itself.
NEWS
November 10, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
'WILD River' is considered Oscar-winning director Elia Kazan's "lost" film. Released with little fanfare in 1960, the unjustly neglected drama has gained in reputation over the years. It's also gained more than a few champions, including director Martin Scorsese, who spearheaded its recent restoration, and film critic, author and documentarian Richard Schickel. At 4 p.m. today, "Wild River" will have a rare theatrical screening at the ArcLight theater as part of the AFI Fest 2005.
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