Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRichard Schlackman
IN THE NEWS

Richard Schlackman

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New allegations that the state attorney general campaign of San Francisco Dist. Atty. Arlo Smith manipulated a high-profile investigation for political ends have surfaced in court documents filed this week.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New allegations that the state attorney general campaign of San Francisco Dist. Atty. Arlo Smith manipulated a high-profile investigation for political ends have surfaced in court documents filed this week.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 4, 1990 | United Press International
Sacramento Kings owner Gregg Lukenbill and four others have been indicted on misdemeanor charges for their alleged role in a campaign to defeat a proposal for a new baseball stadium in San Francisco. A grand jury indicted Lukenbill, 35, Monday on misdemeanor charges of conspiring to violate state election reporting requirements. Also indicted were Lukenbill's key aide, Maurice Read, and political consultants David Townsend, Jack Davis and Richard Schlackman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2011 | By Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times
Andre Pineda, a Democratic pollster and expert on the burgeoning clout of Latino voters, died this week. He was 46. He died Tuesday after jumping off Pasadena's Colorado Street Bridge. Pineda, a native of South Pasadena, built an international campaign practice on the strength of his experience in several facets of electioneering, including direct-mail and field organization as well as opinion polling. His clients included a number of corporations and philanthropic groups along with a roster of Democratic candidates and causes.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1992 | DANIEL AKST
Most Californians don't know it, but they have Kelly Kimball to thank for Lotto. He cooked up the 1984 California lottery initiative, persuaded a big lottery contractor to finance it and got the measure on the ballot. Kimball isn't much of a gambler. Nor is he an education activist, although lottery profits do help the schools. No, Kimball's line is petitions. He just wanted to generate some business.
NEWS
January 29, 1998 | GEORGE SKELTON
Why does a dog wag its tail? Because a dog is smarter than its tail. If the tail were smarter, the tail would wag the dog. --Intro to the movie "Wag the Dog." * This is what the dog-waggers have to say about how President Clinton can spin out of his sex scandal: Stonewall it. Better yet, attack the attacker. No, 'fess up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2003 | James Rainey, Times Staff Writer
A Jesse Ventura action figure battled another plastic figurine named "Special Interest Man" in a now-celebrated 1998 television ad. The Jesse doll growled, "I don't want your stupid money!" And a governor was born. Now candidate Arianna Huffington is flirting in the California recall campaign with the same sort of subversive advertising that helped put the flamboyant one-time pro wrestler in the Minnesota governor's seat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2003 | James Rainey and Jessica Garrison, Times Staff Writers
Seven years after its debut as a political novelty, three years after it helped thrust U.S. Sen. John McCain to center stage for the Republican presidential nomination, the Internet's power and limitations are again on display in the California recall election. Some of the first sparks for removing Gov. Gray Davis from office flashed across computer screens. Petitions delivered online generated as many as one-third of the 1.
NEWS
April 29, 1990 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a year, Democratic state attorney general hopeful Arlo Smith had been itching for a face-to-face, on-the-air confrontation with his better-known opponent, Ira Reiner. The opportunity finally arose when the candidates were hustled into a cramped radio booth recently after addressing a large anti-gang rally in Los Angeles. Trouble was, veteran KABC radio talk show host Michael Jackson failed to recognize Smith's face.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|