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Richard Schultes

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2001 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1947, botanist Richard Evans Schultes was traveling up an Amazon tributary in a rain-soaked, leaking barge. The plants he had collected over many weeks were rotting because he had used poor-quality formaldehyde. He was racked by a high fever, unrelenting nausea and pains in every limb--signs, he would later learn, of malaria and beriberi. Despite these conditions, he and a few companions had coursed over rapids, surviving an encounter with a jagged rock.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2001 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1947, botanist Richard Evans Schultes was traveling up an Amazon tributary in a rain-soaked, leaking barge. The plants he had collected over many weeks were rotting because he had used poor-quality formaldehyde. He was racked by a high fever, unrelenting nausea and pains in every limb--signs, he would later learn, of malaria and beriberi. Despite these conditions, he and a few companions had coursed over rapids, surviving an encounter with a jagged rock.
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NEWS
October 20, 1996 | D. JAMES ROMERO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
News flash: The psychedelic revolution of the '60s--which fueled perhaps the largest generational conflict in history while transforming American politics, revolutionizing music and unzipping sexuality--had its roots in one very conservative, bespectacled ethnobotanist who was more interested in higher education than higher consciousness. This was a Bostonian who regularly voted for the Queen of England during presidential elections because he didn't support the American Revolution of 1776.
NEWS
October 20, 1996 | D. JAMES ROMERO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
News flash: The psychedelic revolution of the '60s--which fueled perhaps the largest generational conflict in history while transforming American politics, revolutionizing music and unzipping sexuality--had its roots in one very conservative, bespectacled ethnobotanist who was more interested in higher education than higher consciousness. This was a Bostonian who regularly voted for the Queen of England during presidential elections because he didn't support the American Revolution of 1776.
NEWS
December 8, 1986 | United Press International
Hundreds of plants containing mind-altering drugs have been discovered around the world in the last century by people who use them routinely, botanists said Sunday at a national meeting. Different kinds of cacti, mushrooms, beans, potatoes, morning glories, berries and tree bark are laced with naturally occurring drugs--most of them alkaloids--that produce hallucinations, feelings of euphoria and drowsiness. Alkaloids can also have a strong toxic effect.
NEWS
May 8, 1987
A leader in the worldwide battle to save tropical rain forests and a scientist who helped shaped modern research on natural hazards and water management have been named recipients of the 1987 Tyler Prize, a USC-administered award that is generally considered the most prestigious in environmental science. Richard Evans Schultes of Harvard University and Gilbert F. White of the University of Colorado are to receive gold medallions and share a $150,000 cash award this evening in Los Angeles.
NEWS
May 17, 1987 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
There will be tropical breezes and flowers, moonlight and soft Hawaiian chants for members of ARCS (Achievement Rewards for College Scientists) attending the annual meeting at the Kahala Hilton on Oahu this week. Among Angelenos in the islands are Mrs. Stuart Davis, president of the national executive boards, ARCS Foundation Inc.; Mrs. James Goerz, president of the Los Angeles chapter; and Mrs. Thomas F. Grojean, president of Los Angeles ARCS Auxiliary Chapter.
NEWS
December 1, 1987 | LEE DEMBART, Dembart is a Times editorial writer.
Plants of the Gods: Origins of Hallucinogenic Use by Richard Evans Schultes and Albert Hofmann (Alexander van der Marck: $16.95; paperback, 192 pages) "Plants of the Gods" is the only book I can recall whose title page contains a "Caution": "This book is not intended as a guide to the use of hallucinogenic plants," it says. "Its purpose is to offer scientific, historical and cultural documentation concerning a group of plants, which are or have been of importance to many societies.
NEWS
September 27, 1996 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The rapid destruction of great parts of the Amazon rain forest has become a matter of great concern to the world. This book explains why. Not explicitly. It mostly tells the story of botanist Richard Evans Schultes. He is, Wade Davis writes, "the greatest ethnobotanist of all, a man whose own expeditions . . . earned him a place in the pantheon along with Charles Darwin, Alfred Russel Wallace, Henry Bates, and his own hero, the indefatigable English botanist and explorer Richard Spruce."
NEWS
March 31, 1985 | GINO DEL GUERCIO, United Press International
Wade Davis, a Harvard University botany student, was asked by his adviser three years ago to fly to Haiti and investigate whether there was any truth to the voodoo myth of zombies. After a series of expeditions over 2 1/2 years, he returned to Cambridge with malaria, hepatitis, the material for a nonfiction book said to read like a spy novel--and the secret formula for creating zombies. "I left knowing nothing about the country and arrived with only my wits," said Davis.
BOOKS
December 19, 1993 | Alan Ereira, Alan Ereira is a British filmmaker who has worked with the Kogi Indians of Colombia, the author of "The Elder Brothers" and founder to the Tairona Heritage Trust
Mark Plotkin is the chief ethnobotanist for Conservation International, and these tales of his apprenticeship are a lesson in the meaning of his world. They are accounts of a number of journeys to remote Amazonian communities in pursuit, not of new medicines, but of old ones--remedies known to a rapidly dwindling number of tribal healers, the "shamans." The knowledge possessed by these old men (for generally they are old, and isolated, and have not apprentices) represents serious money.
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