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Richard Schwadel

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BUSINESS
March 19, 1990 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The authors of the hit guidebook "L.A. Shortcuts" took a roundabout road to success. For the most part, though, their route was typical of those traveled by writers who publish their own books. The inspiration for "L.A. Shortcuts" came to Richard Schwadel and Brian Roberts in 1983, a year before Los Angeles hosted the Summer Olympics, amid widespread fears that the city's streets and freeways would turn into one big, clogged mess during the games.
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BUSINESS
March 19, 1990 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The authors of the hit guidebook "L.A. Shortcuts" took a roundabout road to success. For the most part, though, their route was typical of those traveled by writers who publish their own books. The inspiration for "L.A. Shortcuts" came to Richard Schwadel and Brian Roberts in 1983, a year before Los Angeles hosted the Summer Olympics, amid widespread fears that the city's streets and freeways would turn into one big, clogged mess during the games.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1991 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peckish for Mom's turkey and stuffing, but can't stomach another helping of holiday airport traffic? Not to worry. Even on Thanksgiving Eve, the busiest day of the year at most airports and the beginning of a 675,000-passenger tidal wave at Los Angeles International Airport, there are several options for driving from work to window seat without having to stop for a traffic jam on the way. "L. A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1993 | AL MARTINEZ
It is my theory that the most thought-about subjects in Los Angeles are sex, food, money and how to get there from here, in reverse order of importance. I noticed this at a wedding reception a few days ago. In past years, sex was always the main topic of conversation at such affairs, accompanied by a good deal of tittering. Today, not only is tittering a lost art, but since most newlyweds have been sleeping together for several months, talking about sex is no longer all that compelling either.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1994 | HENRY CHU
In 1989, Richard Schwadel and Brian Roberts wrote not a novel, but a novelty. "L.A. Shortcuts," a good-humored book full of maps and commuting tips, was their self-published collection of bypasses through a region synonymous with freeway gridlock. Upon its release, the manual enjoyed a brief ride as the region's top-selling local guidebook. Then, as expected, sales slowed like the Santa Monica Freeway on a Friday afternoon. That is, until Jan.
NEWS
February 5, 1989 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, Colvin is a Redondo Beach free-lance writer
If you're content to be a member of The Pack--that huge mass of drivers willing to be led by their license plates down the jammed highways of life--then driving for the next four months on the Ventura Freeway will call for patience. As of Feb.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, Colvin is a Redondo Beach free-lance writer
If you're content to be a member of The Pack--that huge mass of drivers willing to be led by their license plates down the jammed highways of life--then driving for the next four months on the Ventura Freeway will call for patience. As of Feb.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1990 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking for love in all the wrong places? No problem. A guidebook titled "The Best Places to Kiss in Los Angeles" might be just the romantic compass you need. Likewise, if you are trying to find a quicker way to cut through Southern California's traffic or a restaurant serving peppery calamari, there is a growing stack of handbooks providing advice.
NEWS
August 20, 1990 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Gene Brull moved to Robinson Street, it was a quiet lane on a Redondo Beach hill. Then one day, commuters discovered it made a fine shortcut to the San Diego Freeway and local office parks. Suddenly, Brull couldn't back out of his driveway for fear of being broadsided by rush-hour road hogs. Children stopped riding bikes on the street. People started keeping pets indoors. So the aerospace engineer and father of three persuaded the city to make Robinson one-way.
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