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Richard Scruggs

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NEWS
December 20, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A pivotal figure who forced Big Tobacco to the settlement table will get about $874 million of the fees awarded to lawyers who handled tobacco lawsuits in Mississippi, Florida and Texas. Richard Scruggs said his Pascagoula, Miss., firm will receive about 24% of the fees paid in the Mississippi case, or $366 million; 5% from Texas' settlement, $165 million; and 10% of Florida's deal, $343 million.
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BUSINESS
May 20, 2001 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key architect of the legal war on Big Tobacco has gone to court against two of the country's richest and best-known plaintiff lawyers, claiming they reneged on a pledge to cut him in on a fortune in legal fees.
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BUSINESS
May 20, 2001 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key architect of the legal war on Big Tobacco has gone to court against two of the country's richest and best-known plaintiff lawyers, claiming they reneged on a pledge to cut him in on a fortune in legal fees.
NEWS
February 26, 2000 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Four years ago, a senior Justice Department official quietly acknowledged to the department that he had revealed secrets about a New York City anti-terrorism operation to the authors of an upcoming book. Despite an in-house call that the official should be disciplined, he escaped formal punishment. But now, amid stepped-up concerns about how the government protects its secrets, the case of Richard Scruggs is drawing new scrutiny because of some troubling questions.
NEWS
February 26, 2000 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Four years ago, a senior Justice Department official quietly acknowledged to the department that he had revealed secrets about a New York City anti-terrorism operation to the authors of an upcoming book. Despite an in-house call that the official should be disciplined, he escaped formal punishment. But now, amid stepped-up concerns about how the government protects its secrets, the case of Richard Scruggs is drawing new scrutiny because of some troubling questions.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tobacco Firm's PR Man Ordered to Testify: A Mississippi judge ordered a New York public relations consultant for Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. to give a sworn deposition in the state's $940-million lawsuit against the tobacco industry. The Jackson County judge ruled that John Scanlon must testify Aug. 30 at the Pascagoula law offices of Richard Scruggs, a private lawyer helping the state prepare its landmark case.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Defendant to Challenge Brown & Williamson Order: Richard Scruggs, the attorney for former Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. executive Jeffrey Wigand, said he will ask a Kentucky judge to revoke a temporary restraining order that bans Wigand from talking about research into the ill effects of tobacco. At issue is a confidentiality contract Wigand signed when he left the Louisville-based tobacco company in 1993.
NEWS
December 20, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A pivotal figure who forced Big Tobacco to the settlement table will get about $874 million of the fees awarded to lawyers who handled tobacco lawsuits in Mississippi, Florida and Texas. Richard Scruggs said his Pascagoula, Miss., firm will receive about 24% of the fees paid in the Mississippi case, or $366 million; 5% from Texas' settlement, $165 million; and 10% of Florida's deal, $343 million.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The state Supreme Court suspended a judge who is being investigated for his role in a dispute over fees involving prominent attorney Richard "Dickie" Scruggs. The court sided with the Mississippi Commission on Judicial Performance, which was concerned that Hinds County Circuit Judge Bobby DeLaughter might have accepted a bribe. The commission claimed the judge had improper communications outside court in a case he ruled on. It also said he engaged in willful and prejudicial misconduct.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
In a move to dispel speculation, the nation's four largest tobacco companies said Tuesday they aren't negotiating to settle liability lawsuits. In a joint statement, Philip Morris Cos., RJR Nabisco Holdings Corp.'s R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., B.A.T. Industries' Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. and Loews Corp.'s Lorillard Tobacco said they "have no intention of settling these or any other pending tobacco cases out of court."
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