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Richard Seed

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NEWS
January 12, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Chicago physicist Richard Seed shrugged off President Clinton's denunciation of his plans to clone humans and reaffirmed his determination to do it abroad. Seed said on "Fox News Sunday" he has received support from infertile couples. He stood firm in his resolve to clone a child within the next two years, saying he would move his enterprise offshore to Tijuana if Congress bans human cloning. Seed, who has a doctorate from Harvard, is unaffiliated with any institution.
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NEWS
September 7, 1998 | From Associated Press
A Chicago physicist who provoked controversy earlier this year by announcing plans to clone humans, says the first person he will try to copy is himself. Richard Seed said his wife, Gloria, has agreed to carry an embryo that would be created by combining the nucleus of one of his cells with a donor egg, the Boston Globe reported in its Sunday editions. Seed declined to give his wife's age, but he described her as "post-menopausal." He refused to give details of how the pregnancy would work.
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NEWS
September 7, 1998 | From Associated Press
A Chicago physicist who provoked controversy earlier this year by announcing plans to clone humans, says the first person he will try to copy is himself. Richard Seed said his wife, Gloria, has agreed to carry an embryo that would be created by combining the nucleus of one of his cells with a donor egg, the Boston Globe reported in its Sunday editions. Seed declined to give his wife's age, but he described her as "post-menopausal." He refused to give details of how the pregnancy would work.
NEWS
January 12, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Chicago physicist Richard Seed shrugged off President Clinton's denunciation of his plans to clone humans and reaffirmed his determination to do it abroad. Seed said on "Fox News Sunday" he has received support from infertile couples. He stood firm in his resolve to clone a child within the next two years, saying he would move his enterprise offshore to Tijuana if Congress bans human cloning. Seed, who has a doctorate from Harvard, is unaffiliated with any institution.
NEWS
January 11, 1998 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Saturday urged swift action by Congress to ban human cloning before a maverick Chicago scientist can begin experiments that the president condemned as "untested and unsafe and morally unacceptable." Strongly denouncing plans announced last week by Richard Seed, a Harvard-educated physicist, Clinton said human cloning carries profound implications that must be thoroughly debated before it is allowed to proceed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1999 | Jason Leopold, (714) 966-5634
Plans to place a nonsupervised skate court at Richard T. Seed Memorial Park will be one of the topics discussed at Wednesday night's City Council meeting. Council members also will consider supporting a state Senate bill designed so cities can create a public beach restoration program. The council meets at 7 p.m. in City Hall, 100 Avenida Presidio. Information: (714) 361-8200.
NEWS
January 7, 1998 | RICK WEISS, THE WASHINGTON POST
A Chicago scientist says he has assembled a team of doctors prepared to clone a human being before Congress has a chance to ban the procedure, and says eight people have already volunteered to be cloned. The scientist, G. Richard Seed, is a physicist with a PhD who has been involved in various kinds of fertility research since the early 1970s but has no university or research laboratory affiliation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
The Food and Drug Administration has decided it has the authority to regulate human cloning, and agency officials warned Monday that it would be a violation of federal law to try the procedure without its approval. "Through the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, we do have the authority to regulate human cloning, and we are prepared to assert that authority," acting FDA Commissioner Michael A. Friedman said. The announcement by a Chicago-area physicist, G.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1998 | LEE HARRIS
Here's the rundown on guests and topics for the weekend's public-affairs programs: Today "Today": The last 100 years in technology; women and heart disease; chef Ric Moonen, 5 a.m. (4)(36)(39). "John McLaughlin's One on One": Foreign policy in the Middle East, 1:30 p.m. (28). "Evans & Novak": Sen. Alfonso D'Amato (R-N.Y.), 2:30 p.m., repeats Sunday 7 a.m. CNN. "Inside Politics Weekend": Political consultant James Carville; GOP consultant Ralph Reed, 3:30 p.m.; repeats midnight, CNN.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1998
Re "Clinton Urges Quick Ban on Human Cloning," Jan. 11: "If God had meant us to fly, he would have given us wings." How often has this simple argument been used to hold humanity down? Of course the argument is flawed in its reasoning, and a better statement would be, "If God had meant us to remain ignorant, he wouldn't have given us minds." All throughout history, religious and static thinkers have condemned advances in human knowledge through science as evil and immoral. However, once the new knowledge is studied, often in secrecy due to threats of persecution, and understood, it becomes accepted and even praised as it inevitably betters the human condition and leads to many unintended benefits.
NEWS
January 11, 1998 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Saturday urged swift action by Congress to ban human cloning before a maverick Chicago scientist can begin experiments that the president condemned as "untested and unsafe and morally unacceptable." Strongly denouncing plans announced last week by Richard Seed, a Harvard-educated physicist, Clinton said human cloning carries profound implications that must be thoroughly debated before it is allowed to proceed.
NEWS
January 15, 1998
D.C. Tagger: A woman on a tour of the White House sneaked a can of spray-paint into the Blue Room, then defaced two statues and a wall. "She was arrested, taken away and given a $10-million grant by the NEA." (Argus Hamilton) Cirque du O.J.: In a recent interview, O.J. Simpson said he loves coming to New York City because he gets a warm reception. "If he thinks it's warm in New York, wait till he gets to his final destination." (David Letterman) No More Visa Ads?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1998
Last February, just days after physicist Richard Seed boasted he would soon attempt to clone humans and one year after Dolly the sheep became the first true clone of another living mammal, Sen. Christopher S. Bond (R-Mo.) rushed an emergency measure onto the Senate floor to ban research into human cloning. "This type of research is morally reprehensible," the senator said, "and should be off-limits to science."
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