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May 1, 2011 | By Leah Ollman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As exhibition titles go, "Richard Serra Drawing: A Retrospective" is as telling as it is concise. By withholding a final 's' on that third word, the title makes clear that to Serra, primarily known as a sculptor, drawing is a verb, not a noun. As he put it, in 1977: "There is no way to make a drawing — there is only drawing. " The show, recently opened at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and running through Aug. 28, is an eye-opener, and even more gratifyingly, a mind-opener. Spanning 40 years and including some 60 pieces, it circumscribes a subset of Serra's output but illuminates the whole, since the artist's works across media occupy a single continuum of concerns having to do with density, gravity, division, juncture, balance and imbalance, presence and void, weight and counterweight.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2011 | By Leah Ollman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As exhibition titles go, "Richard Serra Drawing: A Retrospective" is as telling as it is concise. By withholding a final 's' on that third word, the title makes clear that to Serra, primarily known as a sculptor, drawing is a verb, not a noun. As he put it, in 1977: "There is no way to make a drawing — there is only drawing. " The show, recently opened at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and running through Aug. 28, is an eye-opener, and even more gratifyingly, a mind-opener. Spanning 40 years and including some 60 pieces, it circumscribes a subset of Serra's output but illuminates the whole, since the artist's works across media occupy a single continuum of concerns having to do with density, gravity, division, juncture, balance and imbalance, presence and void, weight and counterweight.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2007 | David Minthorn, Associated Press
They may have to coin a new category of art to describe Richard Serra's revolutionary creations. His colossal mazes of fabricated steel, with their eerie effects, have taken sculpture into a new realm. Once ridiculed for his "Tilted Arc" -- a 10-foot-high wall of steel at the Federal Plaza in New York, demolished in 1989 because of the public outcry -- Serra stuck to his artistic vision and gained renown for site-specific monuments that now dot the globe.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
There's always more than meets the eye in Richard Serra's monumental steel sculpture -- as visitors will see Feb. 16, when the Los Angeles County Museum of Art opens the Broad Contemporary Art Museum, bankrolled by financier and collector Eli Broad. Two of Serra's 2006 works, which debuted at his recent 40-year retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, command the entire ground floor of the new building, designed by architect Renzo Piano.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
There's always more than meets the eye in Richard Serra's monumental steel sculpture -- as visitors will see Feb. 16, when the Los Angeles County Museum of Art opens the Broad Contemporary Art Museum, bankrolled by financier and collector Eli Broad. Two of Serra's 2006 works, which debuted at his recent 40-year retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, command the entire ground floor of the new building, designed by architect Renzo Piano.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1998 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
As Richard Serra and his team installed the last of his "Torqued Ellipses" at the Museum of Contemporary Art's Geffen Contemporary, the husky men looked like dwarfs engaged in a herculean effort. Forklifts and a T-lift did the heavy work and suspended 40-ton steel slabs while they were guided into place, but even the motorized equipment resembled toys in comparison to the huge sculptures.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1993
After I read David Pagel's ecstatic review of the minimalist art of Richard Serra ("Sensuous and Seductive Minimalist Drawings," Nov. 6) and saw the accompanying picture, which really did not show the charm of these creations, I can only say: "Surely you're joking, Mr. Pagel!" ANNE OLMSTEAD La Crescenta
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2006
"Connector," by artist Richard Serra, above, rises on the plaza at Segerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa this week. The sculpture, which consists of five torqued steel plates, is 64 feet tall and about 20 feet in diameter at the bottom, narrowing to a 4-foot opening at the top. The sculpture is one of three large public Serras being installed in Southern California this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2002
THE fact that Caltech President David Baltimore rejected the controversial, and confrontational, Richard Serra sculpture makes me simultaneously laugh and cry ("Caltech rejects Serra's massive wall sculpture," by Bettijane Levine, Nov. 16). Serra's sculpture would have provided the spine that Baltimore lacks. I respect (and expect) student involvement and influence in campus politics, especially when it's radical, but students come and go, and so do faculty, staff and presidents.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2006 | From Associated Press
The Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid has lost a 38-ton steel sculpture by American artist Richard Serra, the museum said. The museum, one of the Spanish city's largest and most popular, commissioned the work -- four stark, steel slabs -- in 1986 and acquired it a year later for about $220,000. After being exhibited, it was placed in a warehouse in 1990 with a company that specialized in storing large-scale artworks. But that company was dissolved in 1998, said daily newspaper ABC.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2007 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Staff Writer
WAIT till the Serra show. That has been pretty much the only line of defense left in recent months for champions of Yoshio Taniguchi's enlarged Museum of Modern Art -- a building that in its dizzying fall from critical grace, in its journey from feted to mocked, has become architecture's version of Howard Dean. When the museum reopened near the end of 2004, the notices were nearly all very positive, even glowing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2007 | David Minthorn, Associated Press
They may have to coin a new category of art to describe Richard Serra's revolutionary creations. His colossal mazes of fabricated steel, with their eerie effects, have taken sculpture into a new realm. Once ridiculed for his "Tilted Arc" -- a 10-foot-high wall of steel at the Federal Plaza in New York, demolished in 1989 because of the public outcry -- Serra stuck to his artistic vision and gained renown for site-specific monuments that now dot the globe.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2006
"Connector," by artist Richard Serra, above, rises on the plaza at Segerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa this week. The sculpture, which consists of five torqued steel plates, is 64 feet tall and about 20 feet in diameter at the bottom, narrowing to a 4-foot opening at the top. The sculpture is one of three large public Serras being installed in Southern California this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
IS Richard Serra America's greatest living sculptor? As his massive steel abstractions have risen from Bilbao, Spain, to San Francisco, many critics have come to think so. Best known for curvilinear structures with vertiginously tilting walls, he carves out great swaths of space in compelling forms that exude dangerous beauty. But there hasn't been much evidence of his status in Southern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2006 | From Associated Press
The Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid has lost a 38-ton steel sculpture by American artist Richard Serra, the museum said. The museum, one of the Spanish city's largest and most popular, commissioned the work -- four stark, steel slabs -- in 1986 and acquired it a year later for about $220,000. After being exhibited, it was placed in a warehouse in 1990 with a company that specialized in storing large-scale artworks. But that company was dissolved in 1998, said daily newspaper ABC.
NEWS
October 27, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
THE Orange County Performing Arts Center will announce Friday that it has commissioned New York artist Richard Serra to create a steel sculpture for the rapidly growing arts complex in Costa Mesa. Soaring to about 60 feet and spreading about 20 feet at its base, the artwork will be the centerpiece of a plaza connecting the performing arts center to the Segerstrom Center for the Arts and the new Renee and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The sculptor of "Tilted Arc," a huge steel arc in the middle of a New York public plaza, cannot sue two officials who plan to remove the work, a federal judge has ruled. The 12-foot-high, 112-foot-long wall in lower Manhattan has been controversial ever since artist Richard Serra unveiled it in 1981. When the U.S. General Services Administration announced plans to remove it, Serra filed a $30-million civil suit. But U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2005 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
He could have been sitting at his own funeral. J. Tony Serra -- the ponytailed, pot-smoking criminal defense attorney famous for fighting the government and celebrated in the 1989 film "True Believer" -- listened as a gallery of some of the Bay Area's most respected lawyers honored him. He was praised as a humanist who practiced law out of love and saved the government "millions of dollars" with back-to-back pro bono cases, funded from his threadbare pocket.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2002
THE fact that Caltech President David Baltimore rejected the controversial, and confrontational, Richard Serra sculpture makes me simultaneously laugh and cry ("Caltech rejects Serra's massive wall sculpture," by Bettijane Levine, Nov. 16). Serra's sculpture would have provided the spine that Baltimore lacks. I respect (and expect) student involvement and influence in campus politics, especially when it's radical, but students come and go, and so do faculty, staff and presidents.
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