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Richard Seyd

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1998
Pasadena Playhouse's new artistic director Sheldon Epps has announced his first season picks since his appointment: Noel Coward's "Present Laughter" (July 19-Aug. 23), to be directed by Richard Seyd; "If Memory Serves" (Sept. 20-Oct. 25), a new play about a former TV star and her disgruntled son, by Jonathan Tolins, author of the theater's previous hit "The Twilight of the Golds"; and the West Coast premiere of Judith Shubow Steir's new musical about the Duke of Windsor and Wallis Simpson, "Only a Kingdom" (Nov.
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NEWS
November 13, 2003 | Daryl H. Miller
Noises Off: Few things get an audience laughing like a door-slamming, plate-dropping, pants-falling farce. Perhaps that's because the genre evokes the barely controlled chaos of everyday life, allowing theatergoers to guffaw at other people who are struggling to hold things together. Since its 1982 premiere, "Noises Off" has stood as a particularly riotous example of the genre. A revival of the Michael Frayn comedy proved cathartic in New York after the Sept. 11 attacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1998 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Henry, I have a confession," Eleanor of Aquitaine says to her husband, King Henry II. "I don't much like our children." That line, from "The Lion in Winter," always draws a laugh, and the laugh is always tempered by understanding--for the audience sees full well that Eleanor and Henry's greedy, duplicitous, rage-filled children are exactly what Mommy and Daddy have made them.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1998 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Despite all appearances, Garry Essendine, the spoiled, aging matinee idol, is an estimable fellow. That may be hard to recognize beneath his pouty fits, his willed helplessness, his bossiness and his lovemaking to every woman who makes herself available, including the wife of a friend. "Present Laughter" is a coming-of-age story of a middle-aged man who should already have matured but hasn't--fame and charm got in his way.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Gay clergy and parishioners face considerable opposition as they try to fit in to the structures of Christianity. D. Paul Thomas' new play "The Presentment" is drawn from this very current conflict. Thomas leaves no doubt about his own position--he supports the church's full inclusion of homosexuals. On paper, at least, it looks audacious for the Pasadena Playhouse to produce a play that so unequivocally advocates a particular point of view about a controversial issue.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2003 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
Few things get an audience laughing like a door-slamming, plate-dropping, pants-falling farce. Perhaps that's because the genre evokes the barely controlled chaos of everyday life, allowing theatergoers to guffaw at other people who are struggling to hold things together. Call it primal scream-with-laughter therapy. Since it first hit the boards in 1982, "Noises Off" has stood as a particularly riotous example of the genre.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
It isn't that one is offended by the sex jokes or the drug jokes or the occasional wrong grammar or the mispronunciation of Gauloises , the French cigarettes that Sarah finds so sexy to smoke in Paris. Not really. What is such a grind in Susan Rubin's "Sarah's Story: Tripping on the Belly of the Beast," which has dimly reopened Theatre 4 at the former Los Angeles Theatre Center, is the endless tripping on absolutely nothing we could care much about.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2006 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
The director character in the backstage lark "Noises Off" offers a sharp, succinct analysis of how to perform farce: "Bang, bang, bang. Bang you're on," he says. "Bang you've said it. Bang you're off." All those bangs indicate the fast pace required for physical comedy, with one or two perhaps also suggesting the slamming of doors, the dropping of pants or any of the myriad other sight gags that keep a farce -- and the laughs it generates -- racing along.
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