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Richard Stark

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BOOKS
December 23, 1990 | LAWRENCE BLOCK, Block's latest novel is "A Ticket to the Boneyard" ( William Morrow).
A few weeks ago I came home carrying a stack of 20 paperback books. "What have you got there?" my wife asked me, and answered the question herself by shuffling through the books. " 'Richard Stark.' 'Richard Stark.' 'Donald E. Westlake as Richard Stark.' These are Don's books about. . . ." "Parker," I supplied. "I'm doing a piece. So I figured I'd better read them." "You read them when they came out," she said, "and you were rereading some of them a few years ago." "Well, yeah," I said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2013 | By Taylor Hackford, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Donald E. Westlake's greatest literary creation, Parker, was first played on-screen by Lee Marvin in "Point Blank" (1967). Marvin's collaboration with first-time feature director John Boorman was wonderfully fertile, giving birth to some indelible cinematic moments. Boorman encouraged Marvin to remain so silent, to suppress his intentions so deeply, that costar Angie Dickinson became totally frustrated in their scenes. Finally, Boorman encouraged Dickinson to unleash her anger by physically attacking Marvin.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2013 | By Taylor Hackford, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Donald E. Westlake's greatest literary creation, Parker, was first played on-screen by Lee Marvin in "Point Blank" (1967). Marvin's collaboration with first-time feature director John Boorman was wonderfully fertile, giving birth to some indelible cinematic moments. Boorman encouraged Marvin to remain so silent, to suppress his intentions so deeply, that costar Angie Dickinson became totally frustrated in their scenes. Finally, Boorman encouraged Dickinson to unleash her anger by physically attacking Marvin.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2009
Donald E. Westlake is dead. This simple sentence can't even begin to encapsulate the enormity of this event. Because it also means Richard Stark has passed on too, as has Tucker Coe and Samuel Holt, Timothy J. Culver and J. Morgan Cunningham and a slew of other pen names best left to gather dust.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2009
Donald E. Westlake is dead. This simple sentence can't even begin to encapsulate the enormity of this event. Because it also means Richard Stark has passed on too, as has Tucker Coe and Samuel Holt, Timothy J. Culver and J. Morgan Cunningham and a slew of other pen names best left to gather dust.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2008 | Dick Lochte, Special to The Times
Dirty Money A Parker Novel Richard Stark Grand Central: 276 pp., $23.99 -- SLAMMING through a new crime novel by Donald E. Westlake -- and it's hard to drag your feet once the process starts -- is a little like spelunking in a cave system whose twisted paths lead to fascinating galleries and grottoes, some bright and sparkly, some shadowy and frightening. "Dirty Money" and the other thrillers Westlake writes under the pseudonym of Richard Stark are of the latter category, an exploration of caverns dark and gritty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1986 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
Richard Stark has no regrets about the job he did as foreman of the jury that convicted Roger Hedgecock a year ago. But Stark said he has developed a curious aversion to courtrooms. "I always want to go back down and walk into a courtroom," Stark said in an interview. "I just haven't been able to do that. . . . It's like when you get sick from a certain food, you don't want to eat that food again."
NEWS
January 28, 1998 | SCOTT BRADFIELD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some of us have missed Parker, the ultimate antihero of crime fiction who first appeared in a series of paperback original novels in the early '60s. A man of many names and few words, Parker isn't an easy guy to get to know, but by means of Horatio Alger-style determination and hard work, he always manages to get ahead. Usually, he organizes heists, the bigger the better: banks, gambling casinos, military payrolls, sometimes even an entire town or two.
OPINION
August 10, 2005
There appear to be hints and rumors that the Bush administration and the military are planning for troop reductions in Iraq in mid-2006. Anyone finding that surprising in the face of current conditions needs only look at the calendar and notice that Nov. 7, 2006, is the date for the midterm congressional elections. RICHARD STARK Rancho Palos Verdes
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2002 | Booth Moore, Times Staff Writer
Let's say you're the 18-year-old son of a head-banging, bat-eating rocker, and you've become the star of a reality show on cable TV. Your lifestyle is a seamless melding of luxury and profanity. Where, exactly, would you go to find a $385 plush terry bathrobe with a two-word obscenity embroidered on the sleeve? Chrome Hearts, naturally, a business that shuns publicity the way some of its famous customers crave it.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2008 | Dick Lochte, Special to The Times
Dirty Money A Parker Novel Richard Stark Grand Central: 276 pp., $23.99 -- SLAMMING through a new crime novel by Donald E. Westlake -- and it's hard to drag your feet once the process starts -- is a little like spelunking in a cave system whose twisted paths lead to fascinating galleries and grottoes, some bright and sparkly, some shadowy and frightening. "Dirty Money" and the other thrillers Westlake writes under the pseudonym of Richard Stark are of the latter category, an exploration of caverns dark and gritty.
NEWS
January 28, 1998 | SCOTT BRADFIELD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some of us have missed Parker, the ultimate antihero of crime fiction who first appeared in a series of paperback original novels in the early '60s. A man of many names and few words, Parker isn't an easy guy to get to know, but by means of Horatio Alger-style determination and hard work, he always manages to get ahead. Usually, he organizes heists, the bigger the better: banks, gambling casinos, military payrolls, sometimes even an entire town or two.
BOOKS
December 23, 1990 | LAWRENCE BLOCK, Block's latest novel is "A Ticket to the Boneyard" ( William Morrow).
A few weeks ago I came home carrying a stack of 20 paperback books. "What have you got there?" my wife asked me, and answered the question herself by shuffling through the books. " 'Richard Stark.' 'Richard Stark.' 'Donald E. Westlake as Richard Stark.' These are Don's books about. . . ." "Parker," I supplied. "I'm doing a piece. So I figured I'd better read them." "You read them when they came out," she said, "and you were rereading some of them a few years ago." "Well, yeah," I said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1986 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
Richard Stark has no regrets about the job he did as foreman of the jury that convicted Roger Hedgecock a year ago. But Stark said he has developed a curious aversion to courtrooms. "I always want to go back down and walk into a courtroom," Stark said in an interview. "I just haven't been able to do that. . . . It's like when you get sick from a certain food, you don't want to eat that food again."
SPORTS
February 24, 1990
DIVISION I Patrick Henry 70, Rancho Buena Vista 52--After a halftime tie, Patrick Henry led by six at the end of the third, then outscored RBV, 21-9, in the fourth. Jason Lonsdale scored 23 points and had 17 rebounds, and Butch Reese added 19 points for Patrick Henry (22-4). DIVISION II Torrey Pines 58, Helix 46--Helix only trailed by 45-43 with two minutes remaining, but Torrey Pines then put it away at the foul line, making 11 of 12 free throws down the stretch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John Flynn, 75, a director best known for the action movies "Rolling Thunder" and "The Outfit," died in his sleep April 4 at his Los Angeles home, his son Tara Flynn said. After working as a script supervisor for director Robert Wise on "West Side Story" and later as an assistant director, Flynn got a chance to direct "The Sergeant," a 1968 film starring Rod Steiger as a repressed military man in post-World War II France.
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