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Richard Stoltzman

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February 14, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
It has never been a secret that a substantial number of jazz musicians have impressive credentials in classical music. Wynton Marsalis' two-world career has merely reaffirmed a point that became evident half a century ago, when Benny Goodman recorded Mozart's Quintet for Clarinet and Strings with the Budapest String Quartet. What has escaped many observers, though, is the fact that these reverential breezes blow in both directions. Stravinsky wrote "Ragtime" in 1918.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2005 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
It's hard to recall a more congenial pair of touring classical musicians than pianist Emanuel Ax and clarinetist Richard Stoltzman. The two seemed to be greatly enjoying themselves at Royce Hall on Thursday night -- bantering playfully as they made their entrances, arms resting on each other's shoulders as they exited, easily fielding questions from the audience after the concert with quick one-liners.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
Richard Stoltzman, who has been called "an artist of indescribable genius" (Washington Post), "a classical superstar" (New York Times) and "the greatest clarinetist of the century" (San Francisco Chronicle), was totally in awe of the late Benny Goodman. Stoltzman's respect for jazz musicians is not really surprising. The son of a railroad man who played saxophone gigs on weekends, he himself played Dixieland while a student at Ohio State University.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Closet clarinetists, it seems, are everywhere. With high-school bands requiring phalanxes of licorice-stick tooters, it is not surprising so many folks have a passing familiarity with the instrument. It is, however, a bit surprising that Richard Stoltzman, one of the world's preeminent clarinetists, started in similar fashion. But he did, then went on to a degree of success that should offer hope to every young aspirant struggling to deal with a squeaky reed.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Closet clarinetists, it seems, are everywhere. With high-school bands requiring phalanxes of licorice-stick tooters, it is not surprising so many folks have a passing familiarity with the instrument. It is, however, a bit surprising that Richard Stoltzman, one of the world's preeminent clarinetists, started in similar fashion. But he did, then went on to a degree of success that should offer hope to every young aspirant struggling to deal with a squeaky reed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2001
Clarinetist Richard Stoltzman will be the soloist in a "Benny Goodman Swing!" program Oct. 26 at 8 p.m. at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. Stoltzman will appear with bandleader David Warble and a big band orchestra to play Goodman classics. The program is part of the Eclectic Orange season sponsored by the Philharmonic Society of Orange County. $20 to $35. (949) 553-2422.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Foundation for Chinese Democracy, created last month by Chinese community leaders in the San Francisco Bay area, and Asia Watch, a human rights monitoring organization, will benefit from proceeds of a concert given Tuesday night in San Francisco. Chinese symphony performers and a clarinetist from Boston performed in support of the pro-democracy students in Beijing. "It's important to cry out when you feel there is suffering. Music can be a more universal way than waving a flag or carrying a sign," said clarinetist Richard Stoltzman, who flew from Boston to perform in the "People for China" chamber concert at Davies Symphony Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1998 | JOSEF WOODARD
Clarinetist Richard Stoltzman has established himself as a preeminent instrumentalist in the classical realm, but has never let that get in the way of what he perceives as a good time, dabbling in jazz and other detours from the art music straight and narrow. He took crossover to new heights Wednesday night at the Hollywood Bowl, stretching from classical to jazz inflections and the Latin leanings of his new album, "Danza Latina."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1999
Television In a bold move to lure new viewers, the Sci-Fi Channel launches a four-hour block of first-run programming: new episodes of "Poltergeist: The Legacy" and "Sliders" and two new series--"Farscape" and "First Wave," starring Sebastian Spence as a man trying to expose an alien invasion. * "Poltergeist: The Legacy" airs at 4 and 8 p.m., followed by "Farscape" at 5 and 9 p.m., "Sliders" at 6 and 10 p.m. and "First Wave" at 7 and 11 p.m. Sci-Fi Channel.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1986 | MARC SHULGOLD
The Sunday afternoon Coleman Chamber Music concert proved a rare bird--a program designed to elicit thought, rather than push-button ovations from those gathered in Beckman Auditorium, Caltech. Clarinetist Richard Stoltzman, violist Walter Trampler and pianist Lee Luvisi worked as a trio only twice (and again in encore), offering an unflashy work by Mozart (K. 498) and half of Max Bruch's undeservedly neglected Eight Pieces, Opus 83.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2001
Clarinetist Richard Stoltzman will be the soloist in a "Benny Goodman Swing!" program Oct. 26 at 8 p.m. at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. Stoltzman will appear with bandleader David Warble and a big band orchestra to play Goodman classics. The program is part of the Eclectic Orange season sponsored by the Philharmonic Society of Orange County. $20 to $35. (949) 553-2422.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1999 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Can you blame Richard Stoltzman for not taking the usual solo clarinet route of playing the Mozart and Weber concertos to death for the rest of his life? Not when you get enterprising, entertaining concerts like the one he put together with the expert, five-man Canadian percussion group NEXUS before a sparse turnout at Royce Hall on Friday night. Indeed, the cunningly constructed cyclical program took Stoltzman about as far out as we've heard him go.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1999
Television In a bold move to lure new viewers, the Sci-Fi Channel launches a four-hour block of first-run programming: new episodes of "Poltergeist: The Legacy" and "Sliders" and two new series--"Farscape" and "First Wave," starring Sebastian Spence as a man trying to expose an alien invasion. * "Poltergeist: The Legacy" airs at 4 and 8 p.m., followed by "Farscape" at 5 and 9 p.m., "Sliders" at 6 and 10 p.m. and "First Wave" at 7 and 11 p.m. Sci-Fi Channel.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1998 | JOSEF WOODARD
Clarinetist Richard Stoltzman has established himself as a preeminent instrumentalist in the classical realm, but has never let that get in the way of what he perceives as a good time, dabbling in jazz and other detours from the art music straight and narrow. He took crossover to new heights Wednesday night at the Hollywood Bowl, stretching from classical to jazz inflections and the Latin leanings of his new album, "Danza Latina."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1998 | Don Heckman, Don Heckman is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Ask clarinetist Richard Stoltzman to label himself as an artist, and the answer is short and sweet: "My life," he says, "is in classical music." No argument there.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1997 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The June music festival in Ojai is world-famous for its lively programming and lovely setting. But for the typical Southern Californian who lives so much in sun and haze, it can also be a lecture on the weather. The 51st Ojai Festival, under the artistic direction of pianist Emanuel Ax this year, had begun magnificently Friday night, with chamber music enlivened by the all the natural peculiarities of the outdoor Libbey Bowl. But as the weather darkened Saturday, so had some of the music making.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1999 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Can you blame Richard Stoltzman for not taking the usual solo clarinet route of playing the Mozart and Weber concertos to death for the rest of his life? Not when you get enterprising, entertaining concerts like the one he put together with the expert, five-man Canadian percussion group NEXUS before a sparse turnout at Royce Hall on Friday night. Indeed, the cunningly constructed cyclical program took Stoltzman about as far out as we've heard him go.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1985 | MARC SHULGOLD
Hollywood Bowl is probably the world's most unlikely spot for a successful clarinet recital. But Richard Stoltzman managed, through charming repertorial choices and an equally winning personality, to captivate his audience Wednesday--for half an evening, anyway. After a dreary first half devoted to humdrum readings of the forgettable Grand Duo Concertante by Weber and the overly serious F-minor Sonata by Brahms, Stoltzman unexpectedly turned entertainer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1997 | H. GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I've heard that the comeback of heroin has spawned "junkie chic" in clothing styles and behavior trends. A movie called "Trainspotting" chronicles the desperate lives of some Scottish addicts. Apparently hard-drug-user slice-of-life stuff is cool again after a long period of exile. But for me, needles and spoons never went away. For 30 years they've been inside the front door of my family home.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1993 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rare is the performer who can brave the crossover waters and survive with integrity intact. Clarinetist Richard Stoltzman is an old hand in the art--and the business--of crossing over, from classical to jazz to new music to new age, without flinching or apology. A little apology or coherency of programming would have been in order when Stoltzman served up his grab-bag concert at Hollywood Bowl on Wednesday.
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