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Richard Stratton

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October 21, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saul Williams, a handsome spoken-word poetry whiz, who was featured in the recent documentary "SlamNation," now stars in Marc Levin's fictional "Slam." A young man with a charismatic presence and a dazzling talent as a poet in recitation, he also proves to be such an accomplished actor you could envision him in a wide range of roles, rhymed or not.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1999 | GENE SEYMOUR, FOR THE TIMES
To those with a fervent belief in the positive energy of cultural crossover, "Whiteboys" offers a stern test--if not a hesitant leap--of faith. The movie documents accurately the capacity of pop culture to make mongrels of its consumers. But it doesn't quite know (or want to know) what to make of it.
OPINION
January 18, 1998
California has just completed a $5-billion building boom that tripled its number of prison cells, but still finds itself without enough space to house prisoners. State prisons are expected to reach maximum capacity by 2000, while county jails are so strained that 2.6 million arrest warrants went unserved last year because there would have been no place to put those arrested. Gov. Pete Wilson has proposed a $1-billion bond measure to fund construction of four new state prisons.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2004 | Peter Carlson, Washington Post
Man, the news from Iraq is, like, a major bummer. Read the mainstream press and all you get is bombings, murders, uprisings, riots and hostages. Fortunately, one publication dares to print the news that won't kill your buzz. That publication is High Times, the marijuana magazine now celebrating its 30th anniversary. And the news is this: There's plenty of weed in the new liberated Iraq.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2002 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Television's most bountiful genre in weekly drama remains crime, which multiplies in prime time far out of proportion to its actual menace to society. How fortunate that it yields some of the small screen's best work. Joining this elite group Sunday is "Street Time," a fine Showtime series about parole officers and parolees, following by just three weeks the premiere of HBO's superior new crime venture, "The Wire."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2000 | THOMAS DOHERTY, Thomas Doherty is chair of the Film Studies Program at Brandeis University and author of "Projections of War: Hollywood, American Culture and World War II" (Columbia University Press, 1999)
With the metamorphosis of Sen. John McCain from a long-shot maverick into a serious contender for the presidency, some nasty undercurrents have rumbled to the surface--namely, that 5 1/2 years as a guest at the Hanoi Hilton have turned the former prisoner of war into a psychic time bomb.
NEWS
June 23, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Showtime has deliberately shied away from producing original series focusing on cops, lawyers and doctors because shows dealing with those professions dominate the network schedule. But the pay-cable outlet has reversed its policy with the gritty "Street Time," premiering Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1994 | SAU CHAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When Maureen McGinley's lawyer couldn't save her from 10 years in prison for dealing cocaine, she turned to Alan Ellis. Ellis, based in San Francisco, is one of a handful of "post-conviction" attorneys who help the convicted get the most out of the federal prison system. With Ellis' help, McGinley's sentence was cut to eight years and a month. McGinley, 41, is serving the last four years at the Federal Prison Camp in Alderson, a minimum-security prison for nonviolent women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2007 | David L. Ulin, Times Staff Writer
I met Norman Mailer in the early 1990s, during a party at the New York Athletic Club. The party was for Mailer's friend Richard Stratton, who had a novel out, and Mailer was the host, holding court at the bar, a flushed grin on his face. Knowing almost no one, I kept to the corners, avoiding Mailer altogether. Still, I couldn't help looking at him periodically, and at one point, I caught his eye. For a moment, the two of us watched each other, until I turned away.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2003 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The seeds of Showtime's weekly crime odyssey, "Street Time," were sown in 1990 when Richard Stratton was in New York, and the concept of a television series about parolees and parole officers began forming in his mind as he sat in a bustling reception area packed with ex-cons. He was waiting to see his parole officer.
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