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Richard Such

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NEWS
July 22, 1990 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like most Americans, Richard Such, 48, has always had to make do with only two or three weeks of vacation each year. But while sitting on a beach in the Yucatan last fall, the San Francisco lawyer decided to do something about it. He whipped out the tools of his trade--a pen and a yellow pad--and wrote a ballot measure that would give most California workers the constitutional right to six weeks off with pay. "I would have done it sooner," he quipped, "but I have to work all the time."
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NEWS
July 22, 1990 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like most Americans, Richard Such, 48, has always had to make do with only two or three weeks of vacation each year. But while sitting on a beach in the Yucatan last fall, the San Francisco lawyer decided to do something about it. He whipped out the tools of his trade--a pen and a yellow pad--and wrote a ballot measure that would give most California workers the constitutional right to six weeks off with pay. "I would have done it sooner," he quipped, "but I have to work all the time."
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NEWS
October 20, 1991
San Francisco attorney Richard Such has written an initiative to put into law the conditions of rewarding the elite with a six-week paid vacation ("Wishful Thinking," by Alan Rider, Sept. 15). While such a vacation sounds fine, what will the "conditions" that declare you eligible for such a vacation do to the sense of job camaraderie? And how will employers justify the morality that employees who don't have high school diplomas have to work while those who do can take a long vacation?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1986
The sponsors of the recent multimillion-dollar TV advertising campaign would have us believe that we need executions and that if we got rid of Chief Justice Rose Elizabeth Bird we would have fewer murders. In 1977, when Rose Bird became chief justice, there had not been an execution in California for 10 years, and the willful homicide rate was 0.011% (11.1 per 100,000). After 8 years of Rose Bird, there still haven't been any executions and, according to the latest statistics from the attorney general's office, the willful homicide rate has gone to 0.0106%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1989
A Dec. 29 execution date was set Tuesday for Lawrence Sigmond Bittaker, who was convicted eight years ago of the kidnap, rape, torture and and murder of five Southland teen-age girls. The 49-year-old former machinist from Burbank, who did not attend Tuesday's hearing, was scheduled for San Quentin's gas chamber by Torrance Superior Court Judge John P. Shook.
NEWS
April 19, 1990
A children's book featuring an Eagle Rock youth, Hector Almaraz, has recently been published and is available in local libraries. "Hector Lives in the United States Now" was written by Joan Hewett of Eagle Rock and photographed by her husband, Richard, using such landmarks as Eagle Rock School, where Almaraz was a student, and St. Dominic's Church. The book was published by J. B. Lippincott Co.
MAGAZINE
September 15, 1991 | Alan Rider, Edited by Mary McNamara
What would you give for three times the paid vacation you get now? How about your vote? San Francisco attorney Richard Such and his "Vacation Initiative" may wind up on the June, 1992, state ballot. If passed, the measure would guarantee the average working stiff six glorious weeks off with pay each year. The idea isn't radical; in Europe, a month-and-a-half's vacation is the norm, and often it's the law.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writer and
First came the 18-year-old La Puente machinist who shot himself with a .22-caliber rifle in 1984 while a tape of Ozzy Osbourne's "Diary of a Madman" blasted heavy metal anthems from his stereo. The next year, a partially burned voodoo doll with pins in its groin and heart was found nailed to the back door of a Baldwin Park dressmaking shop.
NEWS
June 1, 1990
INTELLIGENCE Looking ahead: The day after the Tuesday primary, the winning Democrat for governor will not have the luxury of taking a deep breath before launching a 25-day, madcap fund-raising drive. That's the window between the primary and the end of the June 30 fiscal year when the victor can go to the campaign donors of the vanquished and try to eke out contributions up to $1,000 apiece. Those contributions will count against this fiscal year's limit of $1,000 per year per donor.
BOOKS
April 14, 2002
To the editor: In an otherwise interesting review of two recent books concerning convicted former Los Alamos scientist Wen Ho Lee (Book Review, March 31), Michael Parks states inaccurately that "whether there was ever a leak of nuclear weapons secrets appears very uncertain, at least from what we can gather from the public record." To the contrary: The U.S. intelligence community twice has issued public statements that the People's Republic of China acquired nuclear warhead secrets by espionage.
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