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Richard T Bretzing

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NEWS
January 11, 1987 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
Richard T. Bretzing had just completed the most important and glamorous assignment of a 24-year career with the FBI. As head of the FBI's Los Angeles office, he had supervised the largest FBI counterterrorist operation ever mounted to assure that the 1984 Olympic Games would unfold peacefully. It was a time of hard work, glory and special memories--including a private moment during opening ceremonies when Bretzing gave FBI Olympic pins to President and Mrs. Reagan.
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NEWS
October 1, 1988 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY and WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writers
The FBI suffered a major embarrassment Friday when a U.S. district judge ruled that hundreds of Latino agents have been discriminated against and regularly assigned to demeaning duties commonly known as the "Taco Circuit." The ruling, issued here by U.S. District Judge Lucius D.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1988 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
A top-ranking FBI official in Minneapolis with a reputation as a "street agent's boss" has been selected to replace Richard T. Bretzing as head of the FBI's 450-agent Los Angeles office, FBI officials announced Friday. Lawrence G. Lawler, 47, now head of the FBI's 100-agent Minneapolis office, will take over the job in July when Bretzing, a Mormon bishop, retires to become world security chief for the Mormon Church.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1988 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
A top-ranking FBI official in Minneapolis with a reputation as a "street agent's boss" has been selected to replace Richard T. Bretzing as head of the FBI's 450-agent Los Angeles office, FBI officials announced Friday. Lawrence G. Lawler, 47, now head of the FBI's 100-agent Minneapolis office, will take over the job in July when Bretzing, a Mormon bishop, retires to become world security chief for the Mormon Church.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1987
Your publication of Richard T. Bretzing, head of the Los Angeles FBI office, comments in a letter addressed to Pacific Amphitheatre general manager Steve Redfearn (Part I, Oct. 24) concerning the "Cowboys for Indians" concert on Oct. 27 contributed to a deliberate attempt at misinformation. Bretzing's letter stressing Leonard Peltier's conviction for the murder of two FBI agents in 1975, stated that he was "utterly revolted" at the idea of a benefit concert. He went on to say, "I would like to believe the sponsors and participants of this program are not aware of the facts surrounding the murder of agents (Ronald)
NEWS
October 1, 1988 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY and WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writers
The FBI suffered a major embarrassment Friday when a U.S. district judge ruled that hundreds of Latino agents have been discriminated against and regularly assigned to demeaning duties commonly known as the "Taco Circuit." The ruling, issued here by U.S. District Judge Lucius D.
NEWS
October 24, 1987 | JANE APPLEGATE and RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writers
Southern California's top FBI official said Friday that he is "utterly revolted" over an Orange County concert aimed at raising money for an American Indian activist convicted of "cold-bloodedly" killing two FBI agents. Outraged by publicity surrounding a benefit concert for Leonard Peltier, Richard T. Bretzing, special agent in charge of the Los Angeles FBI office, sent a letter Friday to Steve Redfearn, general manager of the Pacific Amphitheatre in Costa Mesa.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Richard T. Bretzing, head of the FBI's Los Angeles office for the past six years, announced Wednesday that he is retiring to become security chief for the Mormon Church. Bretzing, who will assume his new post at the church's Salt Lake City headquarters, will retire July 1, shortly after he reaches his 50th birthday, concluding a 27-year career with the agency.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Official attendance at the controversial "Cowboys for Indians and Justice for Leonard Peltier" concert featuring Willie Nelson and Joni Mitchell last week at the Pacific Amphitheatre included 5,218 paid admissions and more than 2,400 complimentary tickets, according to an amphitheater official. Earlier estimates indicated attendance was about 9,000. The concert grossed about $96,000, from which yet-to-be-determined show expenses must be deducted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1988
Nearly $700,000 seized from drug dealers in Los Angeles County was presented to Los Angeles County Sheriff Sherman Block and Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl F. Gates at the federal building in Westwood. Richard T. Bretzing, special agent in charge of the FBI office in Los Angeles, commended the officials for the efforts of their departments in seizing the illicit funds. He presented U.S. Treasury checks totaling $188,749 to Block and $508,707 to Gates.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Richard T. Bretzing, head of the FBI's Los Angeles office for the past six years, announced Wednesday that he is retiring to become security chief for the Mormon Church. Bretzing, who will assume his new post at the church's Salt Lake City headquarters, will retire July 1, shortly after he reaches his 50th birthday, concluding a 27-year career with the agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1987
Your publication of Richard T. Bretzing, head of the Los Angeles FBI office, comments in a letter addressed to Pacific Amphitheatre general manager Steve Redfearn (Part I, Oct. 24) concerning the "Cowboys for Indians" concert on Oct. 27 contributed to a deliberate attempt at misinformation. Bretzing's letter stressing Leonard Peltier's conviction for the murder of two FBI agents in 1975, stated that he was "utterly revolted" at the idea of a benefit concert. He went on to say, "I would like to believe the sponsors and participants of this program are not aware of the facts surrounding the murder of agents (Ronald)
NEWS
October 24, 1987 | JANE APPLEGATE and RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writers
Southern California's top FBI official said Friday that he is "utterly revolted" over an Orange County concert aimed at raising money for an American Indian activist convicted of "cold-bloodedly" killing two FBI agents. Outraged by publicity surrounding a benefit concert for Leonard Peltier, Richard T. Bretzing, special agent in charge of the Los Angeles FBI office, sent a letter Friday to Steve Redfearn, general manager of the Pacific Amphitheatre in Costa Mesa.
NEWS
January 11, 1987 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
Richard T. Bretzing had just completed the most important and glamorous assignment of a 24-year career with the FBI. As head of the FBI's Los Angeles office, he had supervised the largest FBI counterterrorist operation ever mounted to assure that the 1984 Olympic Games would unfold peacefully. It was a time of hard work, glory and special memories--including a private moment during opening ceremonies when Bretzing gave FBI Olympic pins to President and Mrs. Reagan.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Entertainers who are scheduled to appear at a benefit concert for Indian activist Leonard Peltier tonight in Costa Mesa have been criticized by Richard T. Bretzing, head of the FBI's Los Angeles office, for taking part in what the FBI agent termed an "utterly revolting" cause. Robin Williams, Kris Kristofferson, Willie Nelson and Joni Mitchell are among those scheduled to perform at the benefit, taking place at the Pacific Amphitheatre tonight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1988 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
FBI agents arrested a man in Costa Mesa Friday who escaped from a Virginia prison almost seven years ago while serving a 20-year sentence for murder, authorities said. Daryle Bean Mayhugh, 35, was arrested near the intersection of Fairview Road and Baker Street about 4 p.m., Richard T. Bretzing, special agent in charge of the FBI's Los Angeles office, said in a statement released Friday. Mayhugh escaped from a prison in Rustburg, Va.
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