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Richard Trattner

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NEWS
July 26, 1989 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
Dozens of tax evaders in Los Angeles have been given protection against criminal prosecution for the last 11 years in a unique program in which they made anonymous payments to the Internal Revenue Service and placed tax returns in secret safe deposit boxes, investigators told a congressional hearing Tuesday. The Los Angeles office approved the unprecedented amnesty-type program without permission from Washington, an investigator said.
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BUSINESS
July 28, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
Top officials of the Internal Revenue Service defended the agency Thursday against charges of unethical conduct, telling a House subcommittee that their own internal policing system is working well and that ethical lapses by employees are "isolated." But Rep. Doug Barnard Jr. (D-Ga.
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BUSINESS
July 27, 1989 | From Times Staff Writers
Richard J. Trattner, the Sherman Oaks attorney accused by congressional investigators of concocting a tax amnesty "scheme" with a former Internal Revenue Service official, is described by at least one of his colleagues as a smart, honest lawyer who simply came up with a better way to represent his clients. "He is a credible person, and I've not heard anyone speak badly of him," said Mark D. Pastor, an Encino-based tax attorney who was a law partner of Trattner from 1974 to 1978.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
A controversial procedure under which tax cheats could pay back taxes and avoid criminal prosecution is a long-established part of Internal Revenue Service practice nationwide and is well known among attorneys specializing in tax disputes, legal experts said Wednesday. The informal practice is described in official IRS manuals--and thus is sanctioned by the agency--and made available to anyone, not just those with close relationships with IRS officials, the experts said.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
Top officials of the Internal Revenue Service defended the agency Thursday against charges of unethical conduct, telling a House subcommittee that their own internal policing system is working well and that ethical lapses by employees are "isolated." But Rep. Doug Barnard Jr. (D-Ga.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
A controversial procedure under which tax cheats could pay back taxes and avoid criminal prosecution is a long-established part of Internal Revenue Service practice nationwide and is well known among attorneys specializing in tax disputes, legal experts said Wednesday. The informal practice is described in official IRS manuals--and thus is sanctioned by the agency--and made available to anyone, not just those with close relationships with IRS officials, the experts said.
NEWS
August 11, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
The commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service, acknowledging that congressional hearings have exposed ethics problems within the agency, pledged Thursday to tighten procedures to ensure that IRS employees are held to "the highest standards" of conduct. Fred T. Goldberg Jr.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
The Internal Revenue Service office in Los Angeles in charge of criminal tax cases was hobbled in recent years by an overbearing director who would tolerate no dissent and by an in-house watchdog unit that failed to do its job, Congress was told Wednesday. Testimony by four past and present IRS investigators came as a House subcommittee continued hearings into charges of misconduct centering on Ronald Saranow, former chief of the agency's criminal investigation division in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1989 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A watchdog group charged Tuesday that the Internal Revenue Service's top criminal investigator in Los Angeles and several colleagues improperly bought property from an El Monte firm that was being audited by the IRS and then used it for their own tax benefit. "Had anything like the El Monte situation occurred in the district I was working in, the officials certainly would have been fired," said Paul J.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1989 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writers
The Los Angeles office of the Internal Revenue Service will be the focus of attention today when a congressional subcommittee, after a yearlong investigation, begins a series of major hearings on corruption and misconduct at the IRS. The IRS has strongly opposed the investigation, which members of Congress believe could uncover one of the biggest scandals in recent years for the image-conscious tax collection agency.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1989 | From Times Staff Writers
Richard J. Trattner, the Sherman Oaks attorney accused by congressional investigators of concocting a tax amnesty "scheme" with a former Internal Revenue Service official, is described by at least one of his colleagues as a smart, honest lawyer who simply came up with a better way to represent his clients. "He is a credible person, and I've not heard anyone speak badly of him," said Mark D. Pastor, an Encino-based tax attorney who was a law partner of Trattner from 1974 to 1978.
NEWS
July 26, 1989 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
Dozens of tax evaders in Los Angeles have been given protection against criminal prosecution for the last 11 years in a unique program in which they made anonymous payments to the Internal Revenue Service and placed tax returns in secret safe deposit boxes, investigators told a congressional hearing Tuesday. The Los Angeles office approved the unprecedented amnesty-type program without permission from Washington, an investigator said.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1989 | BILL SING and KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writers
A controversial procedure under which tax cheats could pay back taxes and avoid criminal prosecution is a long-established part of Internal Revenue Service practice nationwide and is well known among attorneys specializing in tax disputes, legal experts familiar with the practice said Wednesday. The practice is described in official IRS manuals--and thus is sanctioned by the agency nationwide--and not made available only to those with close relationships with IRS officials, the experts said.
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