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Richard Tuttle

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April 28, 2007 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
WHEN "The Art of Richard Tuttle" opened at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art two summers ago, I remember being surprised at the lengthy tour that was planned -- a tour coming to a close now at the Museum of Contemporary Art. The handsome show opened there this week and will remain through July. The tour's uncommon scope stood out for several reasons. Between its two California venues, major museums in New York, Des Moines, Dallas and Chicago booked the Tuttle show.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic
Inevitably, the recent paintings of multicolored dots by B. Wurtz put a viewer in mind of Damien Hirst, he of the thousands of paintings with grids of multicolored circles on a white background. Hirst was neither the first nor only artist to harness the visual theme; but the sheer volume of his parodies of abstract painting colonized the territory, like white cells overwhelming the art-world bloodstream, giving him the dull equivalent of a brand. All the more reason that Wurtz's dot paintings at Richard Telles Fine Arts, seven of which are in the New York-based artist's first solo show at the gallery in several years, are so captivating.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1994 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Tuttle takes slightness to such extremes that he makes more well-known Minimalists look like bombastic showoffs driven to overstatement. Tuttle's unusually delicate yet tough-to-categorize works are initially almost invisible. Only slowly do they open onto curious formal conundrums, before further unfolding to encompass and enliven the entire space in which they're shown.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2007 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
WHEN "The Art of Richard Tuttle" opened at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art two summers ago, I remember being surprised at the lengthy tour that was planned -- a tour coming to a close now at the Museum of Contemporary Art. The handsome show opened there this week and will remain through July. The tour's uncommon scope stood out for several reasons. Between its two California venues, major museums in New York, Des Moines, Dallas and Chicago booked the Tuttle show.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2005 | Christopher Miles, Special to The Times
"It's funny," says Richard Tuttle, strolling through the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art's fourth floor, home to his first full retrospective, "I think you can have a maximum of maybe three real art experiences in a day if you're willing and wanting to, and here we are putting 300 pieces in a show, and I think to myself, 'What are you doing?' " It's less a matter of jitters than an example of the preoccupation with quandary that Tuttle's friends know to be characteristic of his thinking.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic
Inevitably, the recent paintings of multicolored dots by B. Wurtz put a viewer in mind of Damien Hirst, he of the thousands of paintings with grids of multicolored circles on a white background. Hirst was neither the first nor only artist to harness the visual theme; but the sheer volume of his parodies of abstract painting colonized the territory, like white cells overwhelming the art-world bloodstream, giving him the dull equivalent of a brand. All the more reason that Wurtz's dot paintings at Richard Telles Fine Arts, seven of which are in the New York-based artist's first solo show at the gallery in several years, are so captivating.
NEWS
January 8, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A hormone used experimentally to treat cancer and AIDS appears to dramatically lower high blood pressure in rats, and tests will soon begin to see if it helps humans with hypertension, researchers reported today. Researchers at the Masonic Medical Research Laboratory in Utica, N.Y., found that a tiny amount of an immune system hormone, called interleukin-2 (IL-2), normalizes high blood pressure in rats.
NEWS
March 28, 1989
A single-engine plane crashed off California 49, killing all four people aboard, Calaveras County sheriff's deputies said. The plane that crashed between Mokelumne Hill and San Andreas was piloted by Charles R. Drago, 49, of Cameron Park. Deputies identified the other victims as his daughter, Toni Marie Drago, 21, and her boyfriend, Richard Tuttle, 25, both of Livermore, and the elder Drago's nephew, 17-month-old Cory Rowland.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2007 | Suzanne Muchnic
"Robert Rauschenberg: Combines" -- an international traveling exhibition organized by Paul Schimmel, chief curator at L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art, and presented there last summer -- has won the International Assn. of Art Critics' 2005-06 award for the best monographic museum show nationally. Two other honorees will appear at MOCA this spring.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1987 | KRISTINE McKENNA
Minimalism was king of the hill when Carol Kaufman was studying painting at CalArts in the early '70s, and the issues raised by that aesthetic continue to intrigue her. Uninvolved with art market trends, she's the sort of stubborn individual who stakes out a patch of ground that she'll continue to work long after the fields of flashier art stars have gone fallow.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2005 | Christopher Miles, Special to The Times
"It's funny," says Richard Tuttle, strolling through the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art's fourth floor, home to his first full retrospective, "I think you can have a maximum of maybe three real art experiences in a day if you're willing and wanting to, and here we are putting 300 pieces in a show, and I think to myself, 'What are you doing?' " It's less a matter of jitters than an example of the preoccupation with quandary that Tuttle's friends know to be characteristic of his thinking.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1994 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Tuttle takes slightness to such extremes that he makes more well-known Minimalists look like bombastic showoffs driven to overstatement. Tuttle's unusually delicate yet tough-to-categorize works are initially almost invisible. Only slowly do they open onto curious formal conundrums, before further unfolding to encompass and enliven the entire space in which they're shown.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2007
RICHARD TUTTLE'S exhibit at the Museum of Contemporary Art demonstrates my belief that the less there is to see, the more there is to write about ["Whispered, Not Shouted," April 28]. Critic Christopher Knight wrote a longish paragraph, for instance, about "a 3-inch piece of white clothesline, nailed to a white gallery wall," comparing it to "Martin Luther's 95 theses nailed on the door of the castle church ... " etc., etc. Did he and I see the same exhibit? I saw a drawing consisting of a single small spot of ink on a framed piece of paper.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1987 | CATHY CURTIS
Richard Tuttle is at it again in a batch of new sculptures that dress bravely idiosyncratic notions in humble materials with a perversely lame, apologetic air. "Two" consists of a pair of cheap-material slipcovers scrunched up on twin sawhorses made of thin lengths of unpainted wood.
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